Site Feedback

Title 20

You are viewing the current version of the eCFR. The eCFR is up to date as of 6/21/2021.

Title 20

eCFR Content

Editorial codification of the general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register.

PART 416 - SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED
Subpart A - Introduction, General Provisions and Definitions
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5) and 1601-1635 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5) and 1381-1383d); sec. 212, Pub. L. 93-66, 87 Stat. 155 (42 U.S.C. 1382 note); sec. 502(a), Pub. L. 94-241, 90 Stat. 268 (48 U.S.C. 1681 note).

Source:

39 FR 28625, Aug. 9, 1974, unless otherwise noted.

§ 416.101 Introduction.

The regulations in this part 416 (Regulations No. 16 of the Social Security Administration) relate to the provisions of title XVI of the Social Security Act as amended by section 301 of Pub. L. 92-603 enacted October 30, 1972, and as may thereafter be amended. Title XVI (Supplemental Security Income For The Aged, Blind, and Disabled) of the Social Security Act, as amended, established a national program, effective January 1, 1974, for the purpose of providing supplemental security income to individuals who have attained age 65 or are blind or disabled. The regulations in this part are divided into the following subparts according to subject content:

(a) This subpart A contains this introduction, a statement of the general purpose underlying the supplemental security income program, general provisions applicable to the program and its administration, and definitions and use of terms occurring throughout this part.

(b) Subpart B of this part covers in general the eligibility requirements which must be met for benefits under the supplemental security income program. It sets forth the requirements regarding residence, citizenship, age, disability, or blindness, and describes the conditions which bar eligibility and generally points up other conditions of eligibility taken up in greater detail elsewhere in the regulations (e.g., limitations on income and resources, receipt of support and maintenance, etc.).

(c) Subpart C of this part sets forth the rules with respect to the filing of applications, requests for withdrawal of applications, cancellation of withdrawal requests and other similar requests.

(d) Subpart D of this part sets forth the rules for computing the amount of benefits payable to an eligible individual and eligible spouse.

(e) Subpart E of this part covers provisions with respect to periodic payment of benefits, joint payments, payment of emergency cash advances, payment of benefits prior to a determination of disability, prohibition against transfer or assignment of benefits, adjustment and waiver of overpayments, and payment of underpayments.

(f) Subpart F of this part contains provisions with respect to the selection of representative payees to receive benefits on behalf of and for the use of recipients and to the duties and responsibilities of representative payees.

(g) Subpart G of this part sets forth rules with respect to the reporting of events and circumstances affecting eligibility or the amount of benefits payable.

(h) Subpart H of this part sets forth rules and guidelines for the submittal and evaluation of evidence of age where age is pertinent to establishing eligibility or the amount of benefits payable.

(i) Subpart I of this part sets forth the rules for establishing disability or blindness where the establishment of disability or blindness is pertinent to eligibility.

(j) Subpart J of this part sets forth the standards, requirements and procedures for States making determinations of disability for the Commissioner. It also sets out the Commissioner's responsibilities in carrying out the disability determination function.

(k) Subpart K of this part defines income, earned income, and unearned income and sets forth the statutory exclusions applicable to earned and unearned income for the purpose of establishing eligibility for and the amount of benefits payable.

(l) Subpart L of this part defines the term resources and sets forth the statutory exclusions applicable to resources for the purpose of determining eligibility.

(m) Subpart M of this part deals with events or circumstances requiring suspension or termination of benefits.

(n) Subpart N of this part contains provisions with respect to procedures for making determinations with respect to eligibility, amount of benefits, representative payment, etc., notices of determinations, rights of appeal and procedures applicable thereto, and other procedural due process provisions.

(o) Subpart O of this part contains provisions applicable to attorneys and other individuals who represent applicants in connection with claims for benefits.

(p) Subpart P of this part sets forth the residence and citizenship requirements that are pertinent to eligibility.

(q) Subpart Q of this part contains provisions with respect to the referral of individuals for vocational rehabilitation, treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction, and application for other benefits to which an applicant may be potentially entitled.

(r) Subpart R of this part sets forth the rules for determining marital and other family relationships where pertinent to the establishment of eligibility for or the amount of benefits payable.

(s) Subpart S of this part explains interim assistance and how benefits may be withheld to repay such assistance given by the State.

(t) Subpart T of this part contains provisions with respect to the supplementation of Federal supplemental security income payments by States, agreements for Federal administration of State supplementation programs, and payment of State supplementary payments.

(u) Subpart U of this part contains provisions with respect to agreements with States for Federal determination of Medicaid eligibility of applicants for supplemental security income.

(v) Subpart V of this part explains when payments are made to State vocational rehabilitation agencies for vocational rehabilitation services.

[39 FR 28625, Aug. 9, 1974, as amended at 51 FR 11718, Apr. 7, 1986; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997; 83 FR 62459, Dec. 4, 2018]

§ 416.105 Administration.

The Supplemental Security Income for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled program is administered by the Social Security Administration.

[51 FR 11718, Apr. 7, 1986, as amended at 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997]

§ 416.110 Purpose of program.

The basic purpose underlying the supplemental security income program is to assure a minimum level of income for people who are age 65 or over, or who are blind or disabled and who do not have sufficient income and resources to maintain a standard of living at the established Federal minimum income level. The supplemental security income program replaces the financial assistance programs for the aged, blind, and disabled in the 50 States and the District of Columbia for which grants were made under the Social Security Act. Payments are financed from the general funds of the United States Treasury. Several basic principles underlie the program:

(a) Objective tests. The law provides that payments are to be made to aged, blind, and disabled people who have income and resources below specified amounts. This provides objective measurable standards for determining each person's benefits.

(b) Legal right to payments. A person's rights to supplemental security income payments - how much he gets and under what conditions - are clearly defined in the law. The area of administrative discretion is thus limited. If an applicant disagrees with the decision on his claim, he can obtain an administrative review of the decision and if still not satisfied, he may initiate court action.

(c) Protection of personal dignity. Under the Federal program, payments are made under conditions that are as protective of people's dignity as possible. No restrictions, implied or otherwise, are placed on how recipients spend the Federal payments.

(d) Nationwide uniformity of standards. The eligibility requirements and the Federal minimum income level are identical throughout the 50 States and the District of Columbia. This provides assurance of a minimum income base on which States may build supplementary payments.

(e) Incentives to work and opportunities for rehabilitation. Payment amounts are not reduced dollar-for-dollar for work income but some of an applicant's income is counted toward the eligibility limit. Thus, recipients are encouraged to work if they can. Blind and disabled recipients with vocational rehabilitation potential are referred to the appropriate State vocational rehabilitation agencies that offer rehabilitation services to enable them to enter the labor market.

(f) State supplementation and Medicaid determinations.

(1) Federal supplemental security income payments lessen the variations in levels of assistance and provide a basic level of assistance throughout the nation. States are required to provide mandatory minimum State supplementary payments beginning January 1, 1974, to aged, blind, or disabled recipients of assistance for the month of December 1973 under such State's plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI of the Act in order for the State to be eligible to receive title XIX funds (see subpart T of this part). These payments must be in an amount sufficient to ensure that individuals who are converted to the new program will not have their income reduced below what it was under the State program for December 1973. In addition, each State may choose to provide more than the Federal supplemental security income and/or mandatory minimum State supplementary payment to whatever extent it finds appropriate in view of the needs and resources of its citizens or it may choose to provide no more than the mandatory minimum payment where applicable. States which provide State supplementary payments can enter into agreements for Federal administration of the mandatory and optional State supplementary payments with the Federal Government paying the administrative costs. A State which elects Federal administration of its supplementation program must apply the same eligibility criteria (other than those pertaining to income) applied to determine eligibility for the Federal portion of the supplemental security income payment, except as provided in sec. 1616(c) of the Act (see subpart T of this part). There is a limitation on the amount payable to the Commissioner by a State for the amount of the supplementary payments made on its behalf for any fiscal year pursuant to the State's agreement with the Secretary. Such limitation on the amount of reimbursement is related to the State's payment levels for January 1972 and its total expenditures for calendar year 1972 for aid and assistance under the appropriate State plan(s) (see subpart T of this part).

(2) States with Medicaid eligibility requirements for the aged, blind, and disabled that are identical (except as permitted by § 416.2111) to the supplemental security income eligibility requirements may elect to have the Social Security Administration determine Medicaid eligibility under the State's program for recipients of supplemental security income and recipients of a federally administered State supplementary payment. The State would pay half of Social Security Administration's incremental administrative costs arising from carrying out the agreement.

[39 FR 28625, Aug. 9, 1974, as amended at 53 FR 12941, Apr. 20, 1988; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997]

§ 416.120 General definitions and use of terms.

(a) Terms relating to acts and regulations. As used in this part:

(1) The Act means the Social Security Act as amended (42 U.S.C. Chap. 7).

(2) Wherever a title is referred to, it means such title of the Act.

(3) Vocational Rehabilitation Act means the act approved June 2, 1920 (41 Stat. 735), 29 U.S.C. 31-42, as amended, and as may be amended from time to time hereafter.

(b) Commissioner; Appeals Council; Administrative Law Judge; Administrative Appeals Judge defined -

(1) Commissioner means the Commissioner of Social Security.

(2) Appeals Council means the Appeals Council of the Office of Analytics, Review, and Oversight in the Social Security Administration or such member or members thereof as may be designated by the Chair of the Appeals Council.

(3) Administrative Law Judge means an Administrative Law Judge in the Office of Hearings Operations in the Social Security Administration.

(4) Administrative Appeals Judge means an Administrative Appeals Judge serving as a member of the Appeals Council.

(c) Miscellaneous. As used in this part unless otherwise indicated:

(1) Supplemental security income benefit means the amount to be paid to an eligible individual (or eligible individual and his eligible spouse) under title XVI of the Act.

(2) Income means the receipt by an individual of any property or service which he can apply, either directly or by sale or conversion, to meeting his basic needs (see subpart K of this part).

(3) Resources means cash or other liquid assets or any real or personal property that an individual owns and could convert to cash to be used for support and maintenance (see § 416.1201(a)).

(4) Attainment of age. An individual attains a given age on the first moment of the day preceding the anniversary of his birth corresponding to such age.

(5) Couple means an eligible individual and his eligible spouse.

(6) Institution (see § 416.201).

(7) Public institution (see § 416.201).

(8) Resident of a public institution (see § 416.201).

(9) State, unless otherwise indicated, means a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, or effective January 9, 1978, the Northern Mariana Islands.

(10) The term United States when used in a geographical sense means the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and effective January 9, 1978, the Northern Mariana Islands.

(11) Masculine gender includes the feminine, unless otherwise indicated.

(12) Section means a section of the regulations in part 416 of this chapter unless the context indicates otherwise.

(13) Eligible individual means an aged, blind, or disabled individual who meets all the requirements for eligibility for benefits under the supplemental security income program.

(14) Eligible spouse means an aged, blind, or disabled individual who is the husband or wife of another aged, blind, or disabled individual and who is living with that individual (see § 416.1801(c)).

(d) Periods of limitation ending on nonwork days. Pursuant to the Act, where any provision of title XVI, or any provision of another law of the United States (other than the Internal Revenue Code of 1954) relating to or changing the effect of title XVI, or any regulation of the Commissioner issued under title XVI, provides for a period within which an act is required to be done which affects eligibility for or the amount of any benefit or payment under title XVI or is necessary to establish or protect any rights under title XVI and such period ends on a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal legal holiday or on any other day all or part of which is declared to be a nonworkday for Federal employees by statute or Executive Order, then such act shall be considered as done within such period if it is done on the first day thereafter which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday or any other day all or part of which is declared to be a nonworkday for Federal employees either by statute or Executive Order. For purposes of this paragraph, the day on which a period ends shall include the final day of any extended period where such extension is authorized by law or by the Commissioner pursuant to law. Such extension of any period of limitation does not apply to periods during which an application for benefits or payments may be accepted as such an application pursuant to subpart C of this part.

[39 FR 28625, Aug. 9, 1974, as amended at 43 FR 25091, June 9, 1978; 51 FR 11719, Apr. 7, 1986; 60 FR 16374, Mar. 30, 1995; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997; 85 FR 73159, Nov. 16, 2020]

§ 416.121 Receipt of aid or assistance for December 1973 under an approved State plan under title I, X, XIV, or XVI of the Social Security Act.

(a) Recipient of aid or assistance defined. As used in this part 416, the term individual who was a recipient of aid or assistance for December 1973 under a State plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI of the Social Security Act means an individual who correctly received aid or assistance under such plan for December 1973 even though such aid or assistance may have been received subsequent to December 1973. It also includes an individual who filed an application prior to January 1974 and was otherwise eligible for aid or assistance for December 1973 under the provisions of such State plan but did not in fact receive such aid or assistance. It does not include an individual who received aid or assistance because of the provisions of 45 CFR 205.10(a) (pertaining to continuation of assistance until a fair hearing decision is rendered), as in effect in December 1973, and with respect to whom it is subsequently determined that such aid or assistance would not have been received without application of the provisions of such 45 CFR 205.10(a).

(b) Aid or assistance defined. As used in this part 416, the term aid or assistance means aid or assistance as defined in titles I, X, XIV, and XVI of the Social Security Act, as in effect in December 1973, and such aid or assistance is eligible for Federal financial participation in accordance with those titles and the provisions of 45 CFR chapter II as in effect in December 1973.

(c) Determinations of receipt of aid or assistance for December 1973. For the purpose of application of the provisions of this part 416, the determination as to whether an individual was a recipient of aid or assistance for December 1973 under a State plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI of the Social Security Act will be made by the Social Security Administration. In making such determination, the Social Security Administration may take into consideration a prior determination by the appropriate State agency as to whether the individual was eligible for aid or assistance for December 1973 under such State plan. Such prior determination, however, shall not be considered as conclusive in determining whether an individual was a recipient of aid or assistance for December 1973 under a State plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI of the Social Security Act for purposes of application of the provisions of this part 416.

(d) Special provision for disabled recipients. For purposes of § 416.907, the criteria and definitions enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section are applicable in determining whether an individual was a recipient of aid or assistance (on the basis of disability) under a State plan approved under title XIV or XVI of the Act for a month prior to July 1973. It is not necessary that the aid or assistance for December 1973 and for a month prior to July 1973 have been paid under the State plan of the same State.

[39 FR 32024, Sept. 4, 1974; 39 FR 33207, Sept. 16, 1974, as amended at 51 FR 11719, Apr. 7, 1986]

Subpart B - Eligibility
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1110(b), 1602, 1611, 1614, 1619(a), 1631, and 1634 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1310(b), 1381a, 1382, 1382c, 1382h(a), 1383, and 1383c); secs. 211 and 212, Pub. L. 93-66, 87 Stat. 154 and 155 (42 U.S.C. 1382 note); sec. 502(a), Pub. L. 94-241, 90 Stat. 268 (48 U.S.C. 1681 note); sec. 2, Pub. L. 99-643, 100 Stat. 3574 (42 U.S.C. 1382h note).

Source:

47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

General
§ 416.200 Introduction.

You are eligible for SSI benefits if you meet all the basic requirements listed in § 416.202. However, the first month for which you may receive SSI benefits is the month after the month in which you meet these eligibility requirements. (See § 416.501.) You must give us any information we request and show us necessary documents or other evidence to prove that you meet these requirements. We determine your eligibility for each month on the basis of your countable income in that month. You continue to be eligible unless you lose your eligibility because you no longer meet the basic requirements or because of one of the reasons given in §§ 416.207 through 416.216.

[64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999, as amended at 68 FR 53508, Sept. 11, 2003]

§ 416.201 General definitions and terms used in this subpart.

Any 9-month period means any period of 9 full calendar months ending with any full calendar month throughout which (as defined in § 416.211) an individual is residing in a public emergency shelter for the homeless (as defined in this section) and including the immediately preceding 8 consecutive full calendar months. January 1988 is the earliest possible month in any 9-month period.

Educational or vocational training means a recognized program for the acquisition of knowledge or skills to prepare an individual for gainful employment. For purposes of these regulations, educational or vocational training does not include programs limited to the acquisition of basic life skills including but not limited to eating and dressing.

Emergency shelter means a shelter for individuals whose homelessness poses a threat to their lives or health.

Homeless individual is one who is not in the custody of any public institution and has no currently usable place to live. By custody we mean the care and control of an individual in a mandatory residency where the individual's freedom to come and go as he or she chooses is restricted. An individual in a public institution awaiting discharge and placement in the community is in the custody of that institution until discharged and is not homeless for purposes of this provision.

Institution means an establishment that makes available some treatment or services in addition to food and shelter to four or more persons who are not related to the proprietor.

Medical treatment facility means an institution or that part of an institution that is licensed or otherwise approved by a Federal, State, or local government to provide inpatient medical care and services.

Public emergency shelter for the homeless means a public institution or that part of a public institution used as an emergency shelter by the Federal government, a State, or a political subdivision of a State, primarily for making available on a temporary basis a place to sleep, food, and some services or treatment to homeless individuals. A medical treatment facility (as defined in § 416.201) or any holding facility, detoxification center, foster care facility, or the like that has custody of the individual is not a public emergency shelter for the homeless. Similarly, transitional living arrangements such as a halfway house that are part of an insitution's plan to facilitate the individual's adjustment to community living are not public emergency shelters for the homeless.

Public institution means an institution that is operated by or controlled by the Federal government, a State, or a political subdivision of a State such as a city or county. The term public institution does not include a publicly operated community residence which serves 16 or fewer residents.

Resident of a public institution means a person who can receive substantially all of his or her food and shelter while living in a public institution. The person need not be receiving treatment and services available in the institution and is a resident regardless of whether the resident or anyone else pays for all food, shelter, and other services in the institution. A person is not a resident of a public institution if he or she is living in a public educational institution for the primary purpose of receiving educational or vocational training as defined in this section. A resident of a public institution means the same thing as an inmate of a public institution as used in section 1611(e)(1)(A) of the Social Security Act. (See § 416.211(b), (c), and (d) of this subpart for exceptions to the general limitation on the eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits of individuals who are residents of a public institution.)

SSI means supplemental security income.

State assistance means payments made by a State to an aged, blind, or disabled person under a State plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Social Security Act which was in effect before the SSI Program.

We or Us means the Social Security Administration.

You or Your means the person who applies for or receives SSI benefits or the person for whom an application is filed.

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 49 FR 19639, May 19, 1984; 50 FR 48570, Nov. 26, 1985; 50 FR 51517, Dec. 18, 1985; 54 FR 19164, May 4, 1989; 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007]

§ 416.202 Who may get SSI benefits.

You are eligible for SSI benefits if you meet all of the following requirements:

(a) You are -

(1) Aged 65 or older (subpart H);

(2) Blind (subpart I); or

(3) Disabled (subpart I).

(b) You are a resident of the United States (§ 416.1603), and -

(1) A citizen or a national of the United States (§ 416.1610);

(2) An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States (§ 416.1615);

(3) An alien permanently residing in the United States under color of law (§ 416.1618); or

(4) A child of armed forces personnel living overseas as described in § 416.216.

(c) You do not have more income than is permitted (subparts K and D).

(d) You do not have more resources than are permitted (subpart L).

(e) You are disabled, drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability (see § 416.935), and you have not previously received a total of 36 months of Social Security benefit payments when appropriate treatment was available or 36 months of SSI benefits on the basis of disability where drug addiction or alcoholism was a contributing factor material to the determination of disability.

(f) You are not -

(1) Fleeing to avoid prosecution for a crime, or an attempt to commit a crime, which is a felony under the laws of the place from which you flee (or which, in the case of the State of New Jersey, is a high misdemeanor under the laws of that State);

(2) Fleeing to avoid custody or confinement after conviction for a crime, or an attempt to commit a crime, which is a felony under the laws of the place from which you flee (or which, in the case of the State of New Jersey, is a high misdemeanor under the laws of that State); or

(3) Violating a condition of probation or parole imposed under Federal or State law.

(g) You file an application for SSI benefits (subpart C).

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 58 FR 4897, Jan. 19, 1993; 60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995; 61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996; 65 FR 40495, June 30, 2000]

§ 416.203 Initial determinations of SSI eligibility.

(a) What happens when you apply for SSI benefits. When you apply for SSI benefits we will ask you for documents and any other information we need to make sure you meet all the requirements. We will ask for information about your income and resources and about other eligibility requirements and you must answer completely. We will help you get any documents you need but do not have.

(b) How we determine your eligibility for SSI benefits. We determine that you are eligible for SSI benefits for a given month if you meet the requirements in § 416.202 in that month. However, you cannot become eligible for payment of SSI benefits until the month after the month in which you first become eligible for SSI benefits (see § 416.501). In addition, we usually determine the amount of your SSI benefits for a month based on your income in an earlier month (see § 416.420). Thus, it is possible for you to meet the eligibility requirements in a given month but receive no benefit payment for that month.

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 48570, Nov. 26, 1985; 64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.204 Redeterminations of SSI eligibility.

(a) Redeterminations defined. A redetermination is a review of your eligibility to make sure that you are still eligible and that you are receiving the right amount of SSI benefits. This review deals with the requirements for eligibility other than whether you are still disabled or blind. Continuation of disability or blindness reviews are discussed in §§ 416.989 and 416.990.

(b) When we make redeterminations.

(1) We redetermine your eligibility on a scheduled basis at periodic intervals. The length of time between scheduled redeterminations varies depending on the likelihood that your situation may change in a way that affects your benefits.

(2) We may also redetermine your eligibility when you tell us (or we otherwise learn) of a change in your situation which affects your eligibility or the amount of your benefit.

(c) The period for which a redetermination applies:

(1) The first redetermination applies to -

(i) The month in which we make the redetermination;

(ii) All months beginning with the first day of the latest of the following:

(A) The month of first eligibility or re-eligibility; or

(B) The month of application; or

(C) The month of deferred or updated development; and

(iii) Future months until the second redetermination.

(2) All other redeterminations apply to -

(i) The month in which we make the redetermination;

(ii) All months beginning with the first day of the month the last redetermination was initiated; and

(iii) Future months until the next redetermination.

(3) If we made two redeterminations which cover the same month, the later redetermination is the one we apply to that month.

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 48570, Nov. 26, 1985; 58 FR 64893, Dec. 10, 1993]

Reasons Why You May Not Get SSI Benefits for Which You Are Otherwise Eligible
§ 416.207 You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

(a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records that financial institution may have about you. You must give us this permission when you apply for SSI payments or when we ask for it at a later time. You must also provide us with permission from anyone whose income and resources we consider as being available to you, i.e., deemors (see §§ 416.1160, 416.1202, 416.1203, and 416.1204).

(b) Financial institution means any:

(1) Bank,

(2) Savings bank,

(3) Credit card issuer,

(4) Industrial loan company,

(5) Trust company,

(6) Savings association,

(7) Building and loan,

(8) Homestead association,

(9) Credit union,

(10) Consumer finance institution, or

(11) Any other financial institution as defined in section 1101(1) of the Right to Financial Privacy Act.

(c) Financial record means an original of, a copy of, or information known to have been derived from any record held by the financial institution pertaining to your relationship with the financial institution.

(d) We may ask any financial institution for information on any financial account concerning you. We may also ask for information on any financial accounts for anyone whose income and resources we consider as being available to you (see §§ 416.1160, 416.1202, 416.1203, and 416.1204).

(e) We ask financial institutions for this information when we think that it is necessary to determine your SSI eligibility or payment amount.

(f) Your permission to contact financial institutions, and the permission of anyone whose income and resources we consider as being available to you, i.e., a deemor (see §§ 416.1160, 416.1202, 416.1203, and 416.1204), remains in effect until a terminating event occurs. The following terminating events only apply prospectively and do not invalidate the permission for past periods.

(1) You cancel your permission in writing and provide the writing to us.

(2) The deemor cancels their permission in writing and provides the writing to us.

(3) The basis on which we consider a deemor's income and resources available to you ends, e.g. when spouses separate or divorce or a child attains age 18.

(4) Your application for SSI is denied, and the denial is final. A denial is final when made, unless you appeal the denial timely as described in §§ 416.1400 through 416.1499.

(5) You are no longer eligible for SSI as described in §§ 416.1331 through 416.1335.

(g) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you when we think it is necessary to determine your SSI eligibility or payment amount, or if you cancel the permission, you cannot be eligible for SSI payments. Also, except as noted in paragraph (h), if anyone whose income and resources we consider as being available to you (see §§ 416.1160, 416.1202, 416.1203, and 416.1204) doesn't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about that person when we think it is necessary to determine your eligibility or payment amount, or if that person cancels the permission, you cannot be eligible for SSI payments. This means that if you are applying for SSI payments, you cannot receive them. If you are receiving SSI payments, we will stop your payments.

(h) You may be eligible for SSI payments if there is good cause for your being unable to obtain permission for us to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about someone whose income and resources we consider as being available to you (see §§ 416.1160, 416.1202, 416.1203, and 416.1204).

(1) Good cause exists if permission cannot be obtained from the individual and there is evidence that the individual is harassing you, abusing you, or endangering your life.

(2) Good cause may exist if an individual other than one listed in paragraph (h)(3) of this section refuses to provide permission and: you acted in good faith to obtain permission from the individual but were unable to do so through no fault of your own, or you cooperated with us in our efforts to obtain permission.

(3) Good cause does not apply if the individual is your representative payee and your legal guardian, if you are a minor child and the individual is your representative payee and your custodial parent, or if you are an alien and the individual is your sponsor or the sponsor's living-with spouse.

[68 FR 53508, Sept. 11, 2003]

§ 416.210 You do not apply for other benefits.

(a) General rule. You are not eligible for SSI benefits if you do not apply for all other benefits for which you may be eligible.

(b) What “other benefits” includes. “Other benefits” includes any payments for which you can apply that are available to you on an ongoing or one-time basis of a type that includes annuities, pensions, retirement benefits, or disability benefits. For example, “other benefits” includes veterans' compensation and pensions, workers' compensation payments, Social Security insurance benefits and unemployment insurance benefits. “Other benefits” for which you are required to apply do not include payments that you may be eligible to receive from a fund established by a State to aid victims of crime. (See § 416.1124(c)(17).)

(c) Our notice to you. We will give you a dated, written notice that will tell you about any other benefits that we think you are likely to be eligible for. In addition, the notice will explain that your eligibility for SSI benefits will be affected if you do not apply for those other benefits.

(d) What you must do to apply for other benefits. In order to apply for other benefits, you must file any required applications and do whatever else is needed so that your eligibility for the other benefits can be determined. For example, if any documents (such as a copy of a birth certificate) are required in addition to the application, you must submit them.

(e) What happens if you do not apply for the other benefits.

(1) If you do not apply for the other benefits within 30 days from the day that you receive our written notice, you are not eligible for SSI benefits. This means that if you are applying for SSI benefits, you cannot receive them. If you are receiving SSI benefits, your SSI benefits will stop. In addition, you will have to repay us for any SSI benefits that you received beginning with the month that you received our written notice. We assume (unless you prove otherwise) that you received our written notice 5 days after the date shown on the notice. We will also find that you are not eligible for SSI benefits if you file the required application for other benefits but do not take other necessary steps to obtain them.

(2) We will not find you ineligible for SSI benefits if you have a good reason for not applying for the other benefits within the 30-day period or taking other necessary steps to obtain them. In determining whether a good reason exists, we will take into account any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language) which may have caused you to fail to apply for other benefits. You may have a good reason if, for example -

(i) You are incapacitated (because of illness you were not able to apply); or

(ii) It would be useless for you to apply (you once applied for the benefits and the reasons why you were turned down have not changed).

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 5573, Feb. 11, 1985; 50 FR 14211, Apr. 11, 1985; 59 FR 1635, Jan. 12, 1994; 61 FR 1712, Jan. 23, 1996]

§ 416.211 You are a resident of a public institution.

(a) General rule.

(1) Subject to the exceptions described in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section and § 416.212, you are not eligible for SSI benefits for any month throughout which you are a resident of a public institution as defined in § 416.201. In addition, if you are a resident of a public institution when you apply for SSI benefits and meet all other eligibility requirements, you cannot be eligible for payment of benefits until the first day of the month following the day of your release from the institution.

(2) By throughout a month we mean that you reside in an institution as of the beginning of a month and stay the entire month. If you have been a resident of a public institution, you remain a resident if you are transferred from one public institution to another or if you are temporarily absent for a period of not more than 14 consecutive days. A person also is a resident of an institution throughout a month if he or she is born in the institution during the month and resides in the institution the rest of the month or resides in the institution as of the beginning of a month and dies in the institution during the month.

(b) Exception - SSI benefits payable at a reduced rate. You may be eligible for SSI benefits at a reduced rate described in § 416.414, if -

(1)

(i) You reside throughout a month in a public institution that is a medical treatment facility where Medicaid (title XIX of the Social Security Act) pays a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care; you are a child under the age of 18 residing throughout a month in a public institution that is a medical treatment facility where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care is paid under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider of such insurance; or, you are a child under the age of 18 residing throughout a month in a public institution that is a medical treatment facility where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care is paid by a combination of Medicaid payments and payments made under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider of such insurance; or

(ii) You reside for part of a month in a public institution and the rest of the month in a public institution or private medical treatment facility where Medicaid pays a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care; you are a child under the age of 18 residing for part of a month in a public institution and the rest of the month in a public institution or private medical treatment facility where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care is paid under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider of such insurance; or you are a child under the age of 18 residing for part of a month in a public institution and the rest of the month in a public institution or private medical treatment facility where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care is paid by a combination of Medicaid payments and payments made under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider; and

(2) You are ineligible in that month for a benefit described in § 416.212 that is payable to a person temporarily confined in a medical treatment facility.

(c) Exception for publicly operated community residences which serve no more than 16 residents -

(1) General rule. If you are a resident of a publicly operated community residence which serves no more than 16 residents, you may be eligible for SSI benefits.

(2) Services that a facility must provide in order to be a community residence. To be a community residence, a facility must provide food and shelter. In addition, it must make available some other services. For example, the other services could be -

(i) Social services;

(ii) Help with personal living activities;

(iii) Training in socialization and life skills; or

(iv) Providing occasional or incidental medical or remedial care.

(3) Serving no more than 16 residents. A community residence serves no more than 16 residents if -

(i) It is designed and planned to serve no more than 16 residents, or the design and plan were changed to serve no more than 16 residents; and

(ii) It is in fact serving 16 or fewer residents.

(4) Publicly operated. A community residence is publicly operated if it is operated or controlled by the Federal government, a State, or a political subdivision of a State such as a city or county.

(5) Facilities which are not a publicly operated community residence. If you live in any of the following facilities, you are not a resident of a publicly operated community residence:

(i) A residential facility which is on the grounds of or next to a large institution or multipurpose complex;

(ii) An educational or vocational training institution whose main function is to provide an approved, accredited, or recognized program to some or all of those who live there;

(iii) A jail or other facility where the personal freedom of anyone who lives there is restricted because that person is a prisoner, is being held under court order, or is being held until charges against that person are disposed of; or

(iv) A medical treatment facility (defined in § 416.201).

(d) Exception for residents of public emergency shelters for the homeless. For months after December 1987, if you are a resident of a public emergency shelter for the homeless (defined in § 416.201) you may be eligible for SSI benefits for any 6 months throughout which you reside in a shelter in any 9-month period (defined in § 416.201). The 6 months do not need to be consecutive and we will not count as part of the 6 months any prior months throughout which you lived in the shelter but did not receive SSI benefits. We will also not count any months throughout which you lived in the shelter and received SSI benefits prior to January 1988.

Example:

You are receiving SSI benefits when you lose your home and enter a public emergency shelter for the homeless on March 10, 1988. You remain a resident of a shelter until October 10, 1988. Since you were not in the shelter throughout the month of March, you are eligible to receive your benefit for March without having this month count towards the 6-month period. The last full month throughout which you reside in the shelter is September 1988. Therefore, if you meet all eligibility requirements, you will also be paid benefits for April through September (6 months during the 9-month period September 1988 back through January 1988). If you are otherwise eligible, you will receive your SSI benefit for October when you left the shelter, since you were not a resident of the shelter throughout that month.

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 51518, Dec. 18, 1985; 51 FR 13492, Apr. 21, 1986; 51 FR 17332, May 12, 1986; 51 FR 34464, Sept. 29, 1986; 54 FR 19164, May 4, 1989; 61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996; 62 FR 1055, Jan. 8, 1997; 64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999; 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007]

§ 416.212 Continuation of full benefits in certain cases of medical confinement.

(a) Benefits payable under section 1611(e)(1)(E) of the Social Security Act. Subject to eligibility and regular computation rules (see subparts B and D of this part), you are eligible for the benefits payable under section 1611(e)(1)(E) of the Social Security Act for up to 2 full months of medical confinement during which your benefits would otherwise be suspended because of residence in a public institution or reduced because of residence in a public or private institution where Medicaid pays a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care or, if you are a child under age 18, reduced because of residence in a public or private institution which receives payments under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider, or a combination of Medicaid and a health insurance policy issued by a private provider, pay a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care if -

(1) You were eligible under either section 1619(a) or section 1619(b) of the Social Security Act in the month before the first full month of residence in an institution;

(2) The institution agrees that no portion of these benefits will be paid to or retained by the institution excepting nominal sums for reimbursement of the institution for any outlay for a recipient's personal needs (e.g., personal hygiene items, snacks, candy); and

(3) The month of your institutionalization is one of the first 2 full months of a continuous period of confinement.

(b) Benefits payable under section 1611(e)(1)(G) of the Social Security Act.

(1) Subject to eligibility and regular computation rules (see subparts B and D of this part), you are eligible for the benefits payable under section 1611(e)(1)(G) of the Social Security Act for up to 3 full months of medical confinement during which your benefits would otherwise be suspended because of residence in a public institution or reduced because of residence in a public or private institution where Medicaid pays a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care or, if you are a child under age 18, reduced because of residence in a public or private institution which receives payments under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider, or a combination of Medicaid and a health insurance policy issued by a private provider, pay a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of your care if -

(i) You were eligible for SSI cash benefits and/or federally administered State supplementary payments for the month immediately prior to the first full month you were a resident in such institution;

(ii) The month of your institutionalization is one of the first 3 full months of a continuous period of confinement;

(iii) A physician certifies, in writing, that you are not likely to be confined for longer than 90 full consecutive days following the day you entered the institution, and the certification is submitted to SSA no later than the day of discharge or the 90th full day of confinement, whichever is earlier; and

(iv) You need to pay expenses to maintain the home or living arrangement to which you intend to return after institutionalization and evidence regarding your need to pay these expenses is submitted to SSA no later than the day of discharge or the 90th full day of confinement, whichever is earlier.

(2) We will determine the date of submission of the evidence required in paragraphs (b)(1) (iii) and (iv) of this section to be the date we receive it or, if mailed, the date of the postmark.

(c) Prohibition against using benefits for current maintenance. If the recipient is a resident in an institution, the recipient or his or her representative payee will not be permitted to pay the institution any portion of benefits payable under section 1611(e)(1)(G) excepting nominal sums for reimbursement of the institution for any outlay for the recipient's personal needs (e.g., personal hygiene items, snacks, candy). If the institution is the representative payee, it will not be permitted to retain any portion of these benefits for the cost of the recipient's current maintenance excepting nominal sums for reimbursement for outlays for the recipient's personal needs.

[61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 1055, Jan. 8, 1997; 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007]

§ 416.214 You are disabled and drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability.

(a) If you do not comply with treatment requirements. If you receive benefits because you are disabled and drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability (see § 416.935), you must avail yourself of any appropriate treatment for your drug addiction or alcoholism at an approved institution or facility when this treatment is available and make progress in your treatment. You are not eligible for SSI benefits beginning with the month after the month you are notified in writing that we determined that you have failed to comply with the treatment requirements. If your benefits are suspended because you failed to comply with treatment requirements, you will not be eligible to receive benefits until you have demonstrated compliance with treatment for a period of time, as specified in § 416.1326. The rules regarding treatment for drug addiction and alcoholism are in subpart I of this part.

(b) If you previously received 36 months of SSI or Social Security benefits. You are not eligible for SSI benefits by reason of disability on the basis of drug addiction or alcoholism as described in § 416.935 if -

(1) You previously received a total of 36 months of SSI benefits on the basis of disability and drug addiction or alcoholism was a contributing factor material to the determination of disability for months beginning March 1995, as described in § 416.935. Not included in these 36 months are months before March 1995 and months for which your benefits were suspended for any reason. The 36-month limit is no longer effective for months beginning after September 2004; or

(2) You previously received a total of 36 months of Social Security benefits counted in accordance with the provisions of §§ 404.316, 404.337, and 404.352 by reason of disability on the basis of drug addiction or alcoholism as described in § 404.1535.

[60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995. Redesignated at 61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996]

§ 416.215 You leave the United States.

You lose your eligibility for SSI benefits for any month during all of which you are outside of the United States. If you are outside of the United States for 30 days or more in a row, you are not considered to be back in the United States until you are back for 30 days in a row. You may again be eligible for SSI benefits in the month in which the 30 days end if you continue to meet all other eligibility requirements.

By United States, we mean the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

[47 FR 3103, Jan. 22, 1982. Redesignated at 61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996]

§ 416.216 You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas.

(a) General rule. For purposes of this part, overseas means any location outside the United States as defined in § 416.215; i.e., the 50 States, the District of Columbia and the Northern Mariana Islands. You may be eligible for SSI benefits if you live overseas and if -

(1) You are a child as described in § 416.1856;

(2) You are a citizen of the United States; and

(3) You are living with a parent as described in § 416.1881 who is a member of the armed forces of the United States assigned to permanent duty ashore overseas.

(b) Living with. You are considered to be living with your parent who is a member of the armed forces if -

(1) You physically live with the parent who is a member of the armed forces overseas; or

(2) You are not living in the same household as the military parent but your presence overseas is due to his or her permanent duty assignment.

[58 FR 4897, Jan. 19, 1993; 58 FR 9597, Feb. 22, 1993, as amended at 59 FR 41400, Aug. 12, 1994. Redesignated at 61 FR 10277, Mar. 13, 1996; 70 FR 61366, Oct. 24, 2005]

Eligibility for Increased Benefits Because of Essential Persons
§ 416.220 General.

If you are a qualified individual and have an essential person you may be eligible for increased benefits. You may be a qualified individual and have an essential person only if you received benefits under a State assistance plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Act for December 1973. Definitions and rules that apply to qualified individuals and essential persons are discussed in §§ 416.221 through 416.223.

§ 416.221 Who is a qualified individual.

You are a qualified individual if -

(a) You received aid or assistance for the month of December 1973 under a State plan approved under title I, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Act;

(b) The State took into account the needs of another person in deciding your need for the State assistance for December 1973;

(c) That other person was living in your home in December 1973; and

(d) That other person was not eligible for State assistance for December 1973.

§ 416.222 Who is an essential person.

(a) General rule. A person is an essential person if -

(1) That person has continuously lived in the home of the same qualified individual since December 1973;

(2) That person was not eligible for State assistance for December 1973;

(3) That person was never eligible for SSI benefits in his or her own right or as an eligible spouse; and

(4) There are State records which show that under a State plan in effect for June 1973, the State took that person's needs into account in determining the qualified individual's need for State assistance for December 1973.

Any person who meets these requirements is an essential person. This means that the qualified individual can have more than one essential person.

(b) Absence of an essential person from the home of a qualified individual. An essential person may be temporarily absent from the house of a qualified individual and still be an essential person. For example, the essential person could be hospitalized. We consider an absence to temporary if -

(1) The essential person intends to return;

(2) The facts support this intention;

(3) It is likely that he or she will return; and

(4) The absence is not longer than 90 days.

(c) Absence of a qualified individual from his or her home. You may be temporarily absent from your home and still have an essential person. For example, you could be hospitalized. We consider an absence to be temporary if -

(1) You intend to return;

(2) The facts support your intention;

(3) It is likely that you will return; and

(4) Your absence does not exceed six months.

(d) Essential person becomes eligible for SSI benefits. If an essential person becomes eligible for SSI benefits, he or she will no longer be an essential person beginning with the month that he or she becomes eligible for the SSI benefits.

§ 416.223 What happens if you are a qualified individual.

(a) Increased SSI benefits. We may increase the amount of your SSI benefits if -

(1) You are a qualified individual; and

(2) You have one or more essential persons in your home.

In subpart D, we explain how these increased benefits are calculated.

(b) Income and resource limits. If you are a qualified individual, we consider the income and resources of an essential person in your home to be yours. You are eligible for increased SSI benefits if -

(1) Your resources which are counted do not exceed the limit for SSI eligibility purposes (see subpart L); and

(2) Your income which is counted for SSI eligibility purposes (see subpart K) does not exceed the sum of -

(i) The SSI Federal benefit rate (see subpart D); and

(ii) The proper number of essential person increments (for the value of an essential person increment see subpart D). One essential person increment is added to the SSI Federal benefit rate for each essential person in your home.

(c) Excluding the income and resources of an essential person.

(1) While an essential person increment increases your SSI Federal benefit rate, that person's income which we consider to be yours may actually result in a lower monthly payment to you. We will discuss this with you and explain how an essential person affects your benefit. If you choose to do so, you may ask us in writing to determine your eligibility without your essential person or, if you have more than one essential person, without one or more of your essential persons. We will then figure the amount of your SSI benefits without counting as your own income and resources of the essential persons that you specify and we will end the essential person increment for those essential persons. You should consider this carefully because once you make the request, you cannot withdraw it. We will make the change beginning with the month following the month that you make the request.

(2) We will not include the income and resources of the essential person if the person's income or resources would cause you to lose your eligibility. The loss of the essential person increment will be permanent.

§ 416.250 Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

(a) Authority and purpose. Section 1110(b) of the Act authorizes the Commissioner to develop and conduct experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects to promote the objectives or improve the administration of the SSI program. These projects will test the advantages of altering certain requirements, conditions, or limitations for recipients and test different administrative methods that apply to title XVI applicants and recipients.

(b) Altering benefit requirements, limitations or conditions. Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, the Commissioner is authorized to waive any of the requirements, limitations or conditions established under title XVI of the Act and impose additional requirements, limitations or conditions for the purpose of conducting experimental, pilot, or demonstration projects. The projects will alter the provisions that currently apply to applicants and recipients to test their effect on the program. If, as a result of participation in a project under this section, a project participant becomes ineligible for Medicaid benefits, the Commissioner shall make arrangements to extend Medicaid coverage to such participant and shall reimburse the States for any additional expenses incurred due to such continued participation.

(c) Applicability and scope -

(1) Participants and nonparticipants. If you are selected to participate in an experimental, pilot, or demonstration project, we may temporarily set aside one or more current requirements, limitations or conditions of eligibility and apply alternative provisions to you. We may also modify current methods of administering title XVI as part of a project and apply alternative procedures or policies to you. The alternative provisions or methods of administration used in the projects will not substantially reduce your total income or resources as a result of your participation or disadvantage you in comparison to current provisions, policies, or procedures. If you are not selected to participate in the experimental, or pilot, or demonstration projects (or if you are placed in a control group which is not subject to the alternative requirements, limitations, or conditions) we will continue to apply the current requirements, limitations or conditions of eligibility to you.

(2) Alternative provisions or methods of administration. The alternative requirements, limitations or conditions that apply to you in an experimental, pilot, or demonstration project may include any of the factors needed for aged, blind, or disabled persons to be eligible for SSI benefits. Experiments that we conduct will include, to the extent feasible, applicants and recipients who are under age 18 as well as adults and will include projects to ascertain the feasibility of treating drug addicts and alcoholics.

(d) Selection of participants. Participation in the SSI project will be on a voluntary basis. The voluntary written consent necessary in order to participate in any experimental, pilot, or demonstration project may be revoked by the participant at any time.

(e) Duration of experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects. A notice describing each experimental, pilot, or demonstration project will be published in the Federal Register before each project is placed in operation. Each experimental, pilot and demonstration project will have a termination date (up to 10 years from the start of the project).

[48 FR 7576, Feb. 23, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 37605, Oct. 8, 1987; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997]

Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite a Disabling Impairment
§ 416.260 General.

The regulations in §§ 416.260 through 416.269 describe the rules for determining eligibility for special SSI cash benefits and for special SSI eligibility status for an individual who works despite a disabling impairment. Under these rules an individual who works despite a disabling impairment may qualify for special SSI cash benefits and in most cases for Medicaid benefits when his or her gross earned income exceeds the applicable dollar amount which ordinarily represents SGA described in § 416.974(b)(2). The calculation of this gross earned income amount, however, is not to be considered an actual SGA determination. Also, for purposes of determining eligibility or continuing eligibility for Medicaid benefits, a blind or disabled individual (no longer eligible for regular SSI benefits or for special SSI cash benefits) who, except for earnings, would otherwise be eligible for SSI cash benefits may be eligible for a special SSI eligibility status under which he or she is considered to be a blind or disabled individual receiving SSI benefits. We explain the rules for eligibility for special SSI cash benefits in §§ 416.261 and 416.262. We explain the rules for the special SSI eligibility status in §§ 416.264 through 416.269.

[59 FR 41403, Aug. 12, 1994]

§ 416.261 What are special SSI cash benefits and when are they payable.

Special SSI cash benefits are benefits that we may pay you in lieu of regular SSI benefits because your gross earned income in a month of initial eligibility for regular SSI benefits exceeds the amount ordinarily considered to represent SGA under § 416.974(b)(2). You must meet the eligibility requirements in § 416.262 in order to receive special SSI cash benefits. Special SSI cash benefits are not payable for any month in which your countable income exceeds the limits established for the SSI program (see subpart K of this part). If you are eligible for special SSI cash benefits, we consider you to be a disabled individual receiving SSI benefits for purposes of eligibility for Medicaid. We compute the amount of special SSI cash benefits according to the rules in subpart D of this part. If your State makes supplementary payments which we administer under a Federal-State agreement, and if your State elects to supplement the special SSI cash benefits, the rules in subpart T of this part will apply to these payments.

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 46763, Nov. 13, 1985; 59 FR 41403, Aug. 12, 1994]

§ 416.262 Eligibility requirements for special SSI cash benefits.

You are eligible for special SSI cash benefits if you meet the following requirements -

(a) You were eligible to receive a regular SSI benefit or a federally administered State supplementary payment (see § 416.2001) in a month before the month for which we are determining your eligibility for special SSI cash benefits as long as that month was not in a prior period of eligibility which has terminated according to §§ 416.1331 through 416.1335;

(b) In the month for which we are making the determination, your gross earned income exceeds the amount ordinarily considered to represent SGA under § 416.974(b)(2);

(c) You continue to have a disabling impairment;

(d) If your disability is based on a determination that drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability as described in § 416.935, you have not yet received SSI cash benefits, special SSI cash benefits, or special SSI eligibility status for a total of 36 months, or Social Security benefit payments when treatment was available for a total of 36 months; and

(e) You meet all the nondisability requirements for eligibility for SSI benefits (see § 416.202).

We will follow the rules in this subpart in determining your eligibility for special SSI cash benefits.

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982, as amended at 59 FR 41404, Aug. 12, 1994; 60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995; 64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.263 No additional application needed.

We do not require you to apply for special cash benefits nor is it necessary for you to apply to have the special SSI eligibility status determined. We will make these determinations automatically.

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982]

§ 416.264 When does the special SSI eligibility status apply.

The special SSI eligibility status applies for the purposes of establishing or maintaining your eligibility for Medicaid. For these purposes we continue to consider you to be a blind or disabled individual receiving benefits even though you are in fact no longer receiving regular SSI benefits or special SSI cash benefits. You must meet the eligibility requirements in § 416.265 in order to qualify for the special SSI eligibility status. Special SSI eligibility status also applies for purposes of reacquiring status as eligible for regular SSI benefits or special SSI cash benefits.

[59 FR 41404, Aug. 12, 1994]

§ 416.265 Requirements for the special SSI eligibility status.

In order to be eligible for the special SSI eligibility status, you must have been eligible to receive a regular SSI benefit or a federally administered State supplementary payment (see § 416.2001) in a month before the month for which we are making the special SSI eligibility status determination. The month you were eligible for a regular SSI benefit or a federally administered State supplementary payment may not be in a prior period of eligibility which has been terminated according to §§ 416.1331 through 416.1335. For periods prior to May 1, 1991, you must be under age 65. Also, we must establish that:

(a) You are blind or you continue to have a disabling impairment which, if drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability as described in § 416.935, has not resulted in your receiving SSI cash benefits, special SSI cash benefits, or special SSI eligibility status for a total of 36 months, or Social Security benefit payments when treatment was available for a total of 36 months;

(b) Except for your earnings, you meet all the nondisability requirements for eligibility for SSI benefits (see § 416.202);

(c) The termination of your eligibility for Medicaid would seriously inhibit your ability to continue working (see § 416.268); and

(d) Your earnings after the exclusions in § 416.1112(c) (6), (8), and (9) are not sufficient to allow you to provide yourself with a reasonable equivalent of the benefits (SSI benefits, federally administered State supplementary payments, Medicaid, and publicly-funded attendant care services, including personal care assistance under § 416.269(d)) which would be available to you if you did not have those earnings (see § 416.269).

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982, as amended at 59 FR 41404, Aug. 12, 1994; 59 FR 49291, Sept. 27, 1994; 60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995]

§ 416.266 Continuation of SSI status for Medicaid

If we stop your benefits because of your earnings and you are potentially eligible for the special SSI eligibility status you will continue to be considered an SSI recipient for purposes of eligibility for Medicaid during the time it takes us to determine whether the special eligibility status applies to you.

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982]

§ 416.267 General.

We determine whether the special SSI eligibility status applies to you by verifying that you continue to be blind or have a disabling impairment by applying the rules in subpart I of this part, and by following the rules in this subpart to determine whether you meet the requirements in § 416.265(b). If you do not meet these requirements we determine that the special eligibility status does not apply. If you meet these requirements, then we apply special rules to determine if you meet the requirements of § 416.265 (c) and (d). If for the period being evaluated, you meet all of the requirements in § 416.265 we determine that the special status applies to you.

[47 FR 15324, Apr. 9, 1982]

§ 416.268 What is done to determine if you must have Medicaid in order to work.

For us to determine that you need Medicaid benefits in order to continue to work, you must establish:

(a) That you are currently using or have received services which were paid for by Medicaid during the period which began 12 months before our first contact with you to discuss this use; or

(b) That you expect to use these services within the next 12 months; or

(c) That you would need Medicaid to pay for unexpected medical expenses in the next 12 months.

[59 FR 41404, Aug. 12, 1994]

§ 416.269 What is done to determine whether your earnings are too low to provide comparable benefits and services you would receive in the absence of those earnings.

(a) What we determine. We must determine whether your earnings are too low to provide you with benefits and services comparable to the benefits and services you would receive if you did not have those earnings (see § 416.265(d)).

(b) How the determination is made. In determining whether your earnings are too low to provide you with benefits and services comparable to the benefits and services you would receive if you did not have those earnings, we compare your anticipated gross earnings (or a combination of anticipated and actual gross earnings, as appropriate) for the 12-month period beginning with the month for which your special SSI eligibility status is being determined to a threshold amount for your State of residence. This threshold amount consists of the sum for a 12-month period of two items, as follows:

(1) The amount of gross earnings including amounts excluded under § 416.1112(c) (4), (5) and (7) that would reduce to zero the Federal SSI benefit and the optional State supplementary payment for an individual with no other income living in his or her own household in the State where you reside. This amount will vary from State to State depending on the amount of the State supplementary payment; and

(2) The average expenditures for Medicaid benefits for disabled and blind SSI cash recipients, including recipients of federally administered State supplementary payments only, in your State of residence.

(c) How the eligibility requirements are met.

(1) You meet the requirements in § 416.265(d) if the comparison shows that your gross earnings are equal to or less than the applicable threshold amount for your State, as determined under paragraphs (b) (1) and (2) of this section. However, if the comparison shows that these earnings exceed the applicable threshold amount for your State, we will establish (and use in a second comparison) an individualized threshold taking into account the total amount of:

(i) The amount determined under paragraph (b)(1) of this section that would reduce to zero the Federal SSI benefit and State supplementary payment for your actual living arrangement;

(ii) The average Medicaid expenditures for your State of residence under paragraph (b)(2) of this section or, if higher, your actual medical expenditures in the appropriate 12-month period;

(iii) Any amounts excluded from your income as impairment-related work expenses (see § 416.1112(c)(6)), work expenses of the blind (see § 416.1112(c)(8)), and income used or set aside for use under an approved plan for achieving self support (see § 416.1112(c)(9)); and

(iv) the value of any publicly-funded attendant care services as described in paragraph (d) of this section (including personal care assistance).

(2) If you have already completed the 12-month period for which we are determining your eligibility, we will consider only the expenditures made in that period.

(d) Attendant care services. Expenditures for attendant care services (including personal care assistance) which would be available to you in the absence of earnings that make you ineligible for SSI cash benefits will be considered in the individualized threshold (as described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section) if we establish that they are:

(1) Provided by a paid attendant;

(2) Needed to assist with work-related and/or personal functions; and

(3) Paid from Federal, State, or local funds.

(e) Annual update of information. The threshold amounts used in determinations of sufficiency of earnings will be based on information and data updated no less frequently than annually.

[59 FR 41404, Aug. 12, 1994; 59 FR 49291, Sept. 27, 1994]

Subpart C - Filing of Applications
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1611, and 1631 (a), (d), and (e) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1382, and 1383 (a), (d), and (e)).

Source:

45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, unless otherwise noted.

General Provisions
§ 416.301 Introduction.

This subpart contains the rules for filing a claim for supplemental security income (SSI) benefits. It tells you what an application is, who may sign it, who must file one to be eligible for benefits, the period of time it is in effect, and how it may be withdrawn. It also tells you when a written statement or an oral inquiry may be considered to establish an application filing date.

§ 416.302 Definitions.

For the purpose of this subpart -

Benefits means any payments made under the SSI program. SSI benefits also include any federally administered State supplementary payments.

Claimant means the person who files an application for himself or herself or the person on whose behalf an application is filed.

We or us means the Social Security Administration (SSA).

You or your means the person who applies for benefits, the person for whom an application is filed or anyone who may consider applying for benefits.

§ 416.305 You must file an application to receive supplemental security income benefits.

(a) General rule. In addition to meeting other requirements, you must file an application to become eligible to receive benefits. If you believe you may be eligible, you should file an application as soon as possible. Filing an application will -

(1) Permit us to make a formal determination whether or not you are eligible to receive benefits;

(2) Assure that you receive benefits for any months you are eligible to receive payment; and

(3) Give you the right to appeal if you disagree with the determination.

(b) Exceptions. You need not file a new application if -

(1) You have been receiving benefits as an eligible spouse and are no longer living with your husband or wife;

(2) You have been receiving benefits as an eligible spouse of an eligible individual who has died;

(3) You have been receiving benefits because you are disabled or blind and you are 65 years old before the date we determine that you are no longer blind or disabled.

(4) A redetermination of your eligibility is being made and it is found that you were not eligible for benefits during any part of a period for which we are making a redetermination but you currently meet the requirements for eligibility;

(5) You are notified that your payments of SSI benefits will be stopped because you are no longer eligible and you again meet the requirements for eligibility before your appeal rights are exhausted.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 60 FR 16374, Mar. 30, 1995; 64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999]

Applications
§ 416.310 What makes an application a claim for benefits.

An application will be considered a claim for benefits, if the following requirements are met:

(a) An application form prescribed by us must be filled out.

(b) be filed at a social security office, at another Federal or State office we have designated to receive applications for us, or with a person we have authorized to receive applications for us. See § 416.325.

(c) The claimant or someone who may sign an application for the claimant must sign the application. See §§ 416.315 and 416.320.

(d) The claimant must be alive at the time the application is filed. See §§ 416.340, 416.345, and 416.351 for exceptions.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 59 FR 44926, Aug. 31, 1994]

§ 416.315 Who may sign an application.

We will determine who may sign an application according to the following rules:

(a) If you are 18 years old or over, mentally competent, and physically able, you must sign your own application. If you are 16 years old or older and under age 18, you may sign the application if you are mentally competent, have no court appointed representative, and are not in the care of any other person or institution.

(b) If the claimant is under age 18, or is mentally incompetent, or is physically unable to sign the application, a court appointed representative or a person who is responsible for the care of the claimant, including a relative, may sign the application. If the claimant is in the care of an institution, the manager or principal officer of the institution may sign the application.

(c) To prevent a claimant from losing benefits because of a delay in filing an application when there is a good reason why the claimant cannot sign an application, we may accept an application signed by someone other than a person described in this section.

Example:

Mr. Smith comes to a Social Security office to file an application for SSI disability benefits for Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones, who lives alone, just suffered a heart attack and is in the hospital. He asked Mr. Smith, whose only relationship is that of a neighbor and friend, to file the application for him. We will accept an application signed by Mr. Smith since it would not be possible to have Mr. Jones sign and file the application at this time. SSI benefits can be paid starting with the first day of the month following the month the individual first meets all eligibility requirements for such benefits, including having filed an application. If Mr. Smith could not sign an application for Mr. Jones, a loss of benefits would result if it is later determined that Mr. Jones is in fact disabled.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 51 FR 13492, Apr. 21, 1986; 64 FR 31972, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.320 Evidence of authority to sign an application for another.

(a) A person who signs an application for someone else will be required to provide evidence of his or her authority to sign the application for the person claiming benefits under the following rules:

(1) If the person who signs is a court appointed representative, he or she must submit a certificate issued by the court showing authority to act for the claimant.

(2) If the person who signs is not a court appointed representative, he or she must submit a statement describing his or her relationship to the claimant. The statement must also describe the extent to which the person is responsible for the care of the claimant. This latter information will not be requested if the application is signed by a parent for a child with whom he or she is living. If the person signing is the manager or principal officer of an institution he or she should show his or her title.

(b) We may, at any time, require additional evidence to establish the authority of a person to sign an application for someone else.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 51 FR 13493, Apr. 21, 1986]

§ 416.325 When an application is considered filed.

(a) General rule. We consider an application for SSI benefits filed on the day it is received by an employee at any social security office, by someone at another Federal or State office designated to receive applications for us, or by a person we have authorized to receive applications for us.

(b) Exceptions.

(1) When we receive an application that is mailed, we will use the date shown by the United States postmark as the filing date if using the date the application is received will result in a loss of benefits. If the postmark is unreadable or there is no postmark, we will use the date the application is signed (if dated) or 5 days before the day we receive the signed application, whichever date is later.

(2) We consider an application to be filed on the date of the filing of a written statement or the making of an oral inquiry under the conditions in §§ 416.340, 416.345 and 416.350.

(3) We will establish a “deemed” filing date of an application in a case of misinformation under the conditions described in § 416.351. The filing date of the application will be a date determined under § 416.351(b).

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 51 FR 13493, Apr. 21, 1986; 59 FR 44926, Aug. 31, 1994]

§ 416.327 Pilot program for photographic identification of disability benefit applicants in designated geographic areas.

(a) To be eligible for SSI disability or blindness benefits in the designated pilot geographic areas during the time period of the pilot, you or a person acting on your behalf must give SSA permission to take your photograph and make this photograph a part of the claims folder. You must give us this permission when you apply for benefits and/or when we ask for it at a later time. Failure to cooperate will result in denial of benefits. We will permit an exception to the photograph requirement when an individual has a sincere religious objection. This pilot will be in effect for a six-month period after these final rules become effective.

(b) Designated pilot geographic areas means:

(1) All SSA field offices in the State of South Carolina.

(2) The Augusta, Georgia SSA field office.

(3) All SSA field offices in the State of Kansas.

(4) Selected SSA field offices located in New York City.

[68 FR 23195, May 1, 2003]

Effective Filing Period of Application
§ 416.330 Filing before the first month you meet the requirements for eligibility.

If you file an application for SSI benefits before the first month you meet all the other requirements for eligibility, the application will remain in effect from the date it is filed until we make a final determination on your application, unless there is a hearing decision on your application. If there is a hearing decision, your application will remain in effect until the hearing decision is issued.

(a) If you meet all the requirements for eligibility while your application is in effect, the earliest month for which we can pay you benefits is the month following the month that you first meet all the requirements.

(b) If you first meet all the requirements for eligibility after the period for which your application was in effect, you must file a new application for benefits. In this case, we can pay you benefits only from the first day of the month following the month that you meet all the requirements based on the new application.

[64 FR 31973, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.335 Filing in or after the month you meet the requirements for eligibility.

When you file an application in the month that you meet all the other requirements for eligibility, the earliest month for which we can pay you benefits is the month following the month you filed the application. If you file an application after the month you first meet all the other requirements for eligibility, we cannot pay you for the month in which your application is filed or any months before that month. See §§ 416.340, 416.345 and 416.350 on how a written statement or an oral inquiry made before the filing of the application form may affect the filing date of the application.

[64 FR 31973, June 15, 1999]

Filing Date Based Upon a Written Statement or Oral Inquiry
§ 416.340 Use of date of written statement as application filing date.

We will use the date a written statement, such as a letter, an SSA questionnaire or some other writing, is received at a social security office, at another Federal or State office designated by us, or by a person we have authorized to receive applications for us as the filing date of an application for benefits, only if the use of that date will result in your eligibility for additional benefits. If the written statement is mailed, we will use the date the statement was mailed to us as shown by a United States postmark. If the postmark is unreadable or there is no postmark, we will use the date the statement is signed (if dated) or 5 days before the day we receive the written statement, whichever date is later, as the filing date of an application for benefits. In order for us to use your written statement to protect your filing date, the following requirements must be met:

(a) The written statement shows an intent to claim benefits for yourself or for another person.

(b) You, your spouse or a person who may sign an application for you signs the statement.

(c) An application form signed by you or by a person who may sign an application for you is filed with us within 60 days after the date of a notice we will send telling of the need to file an application. The notice will say that we will make an initial determination of eligibility for SSI benefits if an application form is filed within 60 days after the date of the notice. (We will send the notice to the claimant, or where he or she is a minor or incompetent, to the person who gave us the written statement.)

(d)

(1) The claimant is alive when the application is filed on a prescribed form, or

(2) If the claimant dies after the written statement is filed, the deceased claimant's surviving spouse or parent(s) who could be paid the claimant's benefits under § 416.542(b), or someone on behalf of the surviving spouse or parent(s) files an application form. If we learn that the claimant has died before the notice is sent or within 60 days after the notice but before an application form is filed, we will send a notice to such a survivor. The notice will say that we will make an initial determination of eligibility for SSI benefits only if an application form is filed on behalf of the deceased within 60 days after the date of the notice to the survivor.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 51 FR 13493, Apr. 21, 1986; 58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993]

§ 416.345 Use of date of oral inquiry as application filing date.

We will use the date of an oral inquiry about SSI benefits as the filing date of an application for benefits only if the use of that date will result in your eligibility for additional benefits and the following requirements are met:

(a) The inquiry asks about the claimant's eligibility for SSI benefits.

(b) The inquiry is made by the claimant, the claimant's spouse, or a person who may sign an application on the claimant's behalf as described in § 416.315.

(c) The inquiry, whether in person or by telephone, is directed to an office or an official described in § 416.310(b).

(d) The claimant or a person on his or her behalf as described in § 416.315 files an application on a prescribed form within 60 days after the date of the notice we will send telling of the need to file an application. The notice will say that we will make an initial determination of eligibility for SSI benefits if an application form is filed within 60 days after the date of the notice. (We will send the notice to the claimant or, where he or she is a minor or incompetent, to the person who made the inquiry.)

(e)

(1) The claimant is alive when the application is filed on a prescribed form, or

(2) If the claimant dies after the oral inquiry is made, the deceased claimant's surviving spouse or parent(s) who could be paid the claimant's benefits under § 416.542(b), or someone on behalf of the surviving spouse or parent(s) files an application form. If we learn that the claimant has died before the notice is sent or within 60 days after the notice but before an application form is filed, we will send a notice to such a survivor. The notice will say that we will make an initial determination of eligibility for SSI benefits only if an application form is filed on behalf of the deceased within 60 days after the date of the notice to the survivor.

[45 FR 48120, July 18, 1980, as amended at 51 FR 13493, Apr. 21, 1986; 58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993]

§ 416.350 Treating a title II application as an oral inquiry about SSI benefits.

(a) When a person applies for benefits under title II (retirement, survivors, or disability benefits) we will explain the requirements for receiving SSI benefits and give the person a chance to file an application for them if -

(1) The person is within 2 months of age 65 or older or it looks as if the person might qualify as a blind or disabled person, and

(2) It is not clear that the person's title II benefits would prevent him or her from receiving SSI or any State supplementary benefits handled by the Social Security Administration.

(b) If the person applying for title II benefits does not file an application for SSI on a prescribed form when SSI is explained to him or her, we will treat his or her filing of an application for title II benefits as an oral inquiry about SSI, and the date of the title II application form may be used to establish the SSI application date if the requirements of § 416.345 (d) and (e) are met.

Deemed Filing Date Based on Misinformation
§ 416.351 Deemed filing date in a case of misinformation.

(a) General. You may have considered applying for SSI benefits for yourself or for another person, and you may have contacted us in writing, by telephone or in person to inquire about filing an application for these benefits. It is possible that in responding to your inquiry, we may have given you misinformation about your eligibility for such benefits, or the eligibility of the person on whose behalf you were considering applying for benefits, which caused you not to file an application at that time. If this happened, and later an application for such benefits is filed with us, we may establish an earlier filing date under this section.

Example 1:

Ms. Jones calls a Social Security office to inquire about filing an application for SSI benefits. During her conversation with an SSA employee, she tells the employee about her resources. The SSA employee tells Ms. Jones that because her countable resources are above the allowable limit, she would be ineligible for SSI benefits. The employee fails to consider certain resource exclusions under the SSI program which would have reduced Ms. Jones' countable resources below the allowable limit, making her eligible for benefits. Because Ms. Jones thought that she would be ineligible, she decides not to file an application for SSI benefits. Ms. Jones later reads about resource exclusions under the SSI program. She recontacts the Social Security office to file an SSI application, and alleges that she had been previously misinformed about her eligibility for SSI benefits. She files an application for SSI benefits, provides the information required under paragraph (f) of this section to show that an SSA employee provided misinformation, and requests a deemed filing date based upon her receipt of misinformation.

Example 2:

Mr. Adams resides in a State which provides State supplementary payments that are administered by SSA under the SSI program. He telephones a Social Security office and tells an SSA employee that he does not have enough income to live on and wants to file for SSI benefits. Mr. Adams states that his only income is his monthly Social Security benefit check. The SSA employee checks Mr. Adams' Social Security record and advises him that he is ineligible for SSI benefits based on the amount of his monthly Social Security benefit. The employee does not consider whether Mr. Adams would be eligible for State supplementary payments. Because Mr. Adams was told that he would not be eligible for benefits under the SSI program, he does not file an application. The employee does not make a record of Mr. Adams' oral inquiry or take any other action. A year later, Mr. Adams speaks to a neighbor who receives the same Social Security benefit amount that Mr. Adams does, but also receives payments under the SSI program. Thinking the law may have changed, Mr. Adams recontacts a Social Security office and learns from an SSA employee that he would be eligible for State supplementary payments under the SSI program and that he could have received these payments earlier had he filed an application. Mr. Adams explains that he did not file an application earlier because he was told by an SSA employee that he was not eligible for SSI benefits. Mr. Adams files an application for the benefits, provides the information required under paragraph (f) of this section to show that an SSA employee provided misinformation, and requests a deemed filing date based on the misinformation provided to him earlier.

(b) Deemed filing date of an application based on misinformation. Subject to the requirements and conditions in paragraphs (c) through (g) of this section, we may establish a deemed filing date of an application for SSI benefits under the following provisions.

(1)

(i) If we determine that you failed to apply for SSI benefits for yourself because we gave you misinformation about your eligibility for such benefits, we will deem an application for such benefits to have been filed with us on the later of -

(A) The date on which the misinformation was provided to you; or

(B) The date on which you met all of the requirements for eligibility for such benefits, other than the requirement of filing an application.

(ii) Before we may establish a deemed filing date of an application for benefits for you under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, you or a person described in § 416.315 must file an application for such benefits. If you die before an application for the benefits is filed with us, we will consider establishing a deemed filing date of an application for such benefits only if a person who would be qualified under § 416.542(b) to receive any benefits due you, or someone on his or her behalf, files an application for the benefits.

(2)

(i) If you had authority under § 416.315 to sign an application for benefits for another person, and we determine that you failed to apply for SSI benefits for that person because we gave you misinformation about that person's eligibility for such benefits, we will deem an application for such benefits to have been filed with us on the later of -

(A) The date on which the misinformation was provided to you; or

(B) The date on which the person met all of the requirements for eligibility for such benefits, other than the requirement of filing an application.

(ii) Before we may establish a deemed filing date of an application for benefits for the person under paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section, you, such person, or another person described in § 416.315 must file an application for such benefits. If the person referred to in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section dies before an application for the benefits is filed with us, we will consider establishing a deemed filing date of an application for such benefits only if a person who would be qualified under § 416.542(b) to receive any benefits due the deceased person, or someone on his behalf, files an application for the benefits.

(c) Requirements concerning the misinformation. We apply the following requirements for purposes of paragraph (b) of this section.

(1) The misinformation must have been provided to you by one of our employees while he or she was acting in his or her official capacity as our employee. For purposes of this section, an employee includes an officer of SSA.

(2) Misinformation is information which we consider to be incorrect, misleading, or incomplete in view of the facts which you gave to the employee, or of which the employee was aware or should have been aware, regarding your particular circumstances, or the particular circumstances of the person referred to in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section. In addition, for us to find that the information you received was incomplete, the employee must have failed to provide you with the appropriate, additional information which he or she would be required to provide in carrying out his or her official duties.

(3) The misinformation may have been provided to you orally or in writing.

(4) The misinformation must have been provided to you in response to a specific request by you to us for information about your eligibility for benefits or the eligibility for benefits of the person referred to in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section for which you were considering filing an application.

(d) Evidence that misinformation was provided. We will consider the following evidence in making a determination under paragraph (b) of this section.

(1) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence is written evidence which relates directly to your inquiry about your eligibility for benefits or the eligibility of another person and which shows that we gave you misinformation which caused you not to file an application. Preferred evidence includes, but is not limited to, the following -

(i) A notice, letter, or other document which was issued by us and addressed to you; or

(ii) Our record of your telephone call, letter, or in-person contact.

(2) Other evidence. In the absence of preferred evidence, we will consider other evidence, including your statements about the alleged misinformation, to determine whether we gave you misinformation which caused you not to file an application. We will not find that we gave you misinformation, however, based solely on your statements. Other evidence which you provide or which we obtain must support your statements. Evidence which we will consider includes, but is not limited to, the following -

(i) Your statements about the alleged misinformation, including statements about -

(A) The date and time of the alleged contact(s);

(B) How the contact was made, e.g., by telephone or in person;

(C) The reason(s) the contact was made;

(D) Who gave the misinformation; and

(E) The questions you asked and the facts you gave us, and the questions we asked and the information we gave you at the time of the contact;

(ii) Statements from others who were present when you were given the alleged misinformation, e.g., a neighbor who accompanied you to our office;

(iii) If you can identify the employee or the employee can recall your inquiry about benefits -

(A) Statements from the employee concerning the alleged contact, including statements about the questions you asked, the facts you gave, the questions the employee asked, and the information provided to you at the time of the alleged contact; and

(B) Our assessment of the likelihood that the employee provided the alleged misinformation;

(iv) An evaluation of the credibility and the validity of your allegations in conjunction with other relevant information; and

(v) Any other information regarding your alleged contact.

(e) Information which does not constitute satisfactory proof that misinformation was given. Certain kinds of information will not be considered satisfactory proof that we gave you misinformation which caused you not to file an application. Examples of such information include -

(1) General informational pamphlets that we issue to provide basic program information;

(2) The SSI Benefit Estimate Letter that is based on an individual's reported and projected income and is an estimate which can be requested at any time;

(3) General information which we review or prepare but which is disseminated by the media, e.g., radio, television, magazines, and newspapers; and

(4) Information provided by other governmental agencies, e.g., the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, State unemployment agencies, and State and local governments.

(f) Claim for benefits based on misinformation. You may make a claim for benefits based on misinformation at any time. Your claim must contain information that will enable us to determine if we did provide misinformation to you about your eligibility for SSI benefits, or the eligibility of a person on whose behalf you were considering applying for benefits, which caused you not to file an application for the benefits. Specifically, your claim must be in writing and it must explain what information was provided; how, when, and where it was provided and by whom; and why the information caused you not to file an application. If you give us this information, we will make a determination on such a claim for benefits if all of the following conditions are also met.

(1) An application for the benefits described in paragraph (b)(1)(i) or (b)(2)(i) of this section is filed with us by someone described in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) or (b)(2)(ii) of this section, as appropriate. The application must be filed after the alleged misinformation was provided. This application may be -

(i) An application on which we have made a previous final determination or decision awarding the benefits, but only if the claimant continues to be eligible for benefits (or again could be eligible for benefits) based on that application;

(ii) An application on which we have made a previous final determination or decision denying the benefits, but only if such determination or decision is reopened under § 416.1488; or

(iii) A new application on which we have not made a final determination or decision.

(2) The establishment of a deemed filing date of an application for benefits based on misinformation could result in the claimant becoming eligible for benefits or for additional benefits.

(3) We have not made a previous final determination or decision to which you were a party on a claim for benefits based on alleged misinformation involving the same facts and issues. This provision does not apply, however, if the final determination or decision may be reopened under § 416.1488.

(g) Effective date. This section applies only to misinformation which we provided on or after December 19, 1989. In addition, this section is effective only for benefits payable for months after December 1989.

[59 FR 44926, Aug. 31, 1994]

Withdrawal of Application
§ 416.355 Withdrawal of an application.

(a) Request for withdrawal filed before we make a determination. If you make a request to withdraw your application before we make a determination on your claim, we will approve the request if the following requirements are met:

(1) You or a person who may sign an application for you signs a written request to withdraw the application and files it at a place described in § 416.325.

(2) You are alive when the request is filed.

(b) Request for withdrawal filed after a determination is made. If you make a request to withdraw your application after we make a determination on your claim, we will approve the request if the following requirements are met:

(1) The conditions in paragraph (a) of this section are met.

(2) Every other person who may lose benefits because of the withdrawal consents in writing (anyone who could sign an application for that person may give the consent).

(3) All benefits already paid based on the application are repaid or we are satisfied that they will be repaid.

(c) Effect of withdrawal. If we approve your request to withdraw an application, we will treat the application as though you never filed it. If we disapprove your request for withdrawal, we will treat the application as though you never requested the withdrawal.

§ 416.360 Cancellation of a request to withdraw.

You may cancel your request to withdraw your application and your application will still be good if the following requirements are met:

(a) You or a person who may sign an application for you signs a written request for cancellation and files it at a place described in § 416.325.

(b) You are alive at the time the request for cancellation is filed.

(c) For a cancellation request received after we have approved the withdrawal, the cancellation request is filed no later than 60 days after the date of the notice of approval of the withdrawal request.

Subpart D - Amount of Benefits
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1611 (a), (b), (c), and (e), 1612, 1617, and 1631 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1382 (a), (b), (c), and (e), 1382a, 1382f, and 1383).

§ 416.401 Scope of subpart.

This subpart D sets forth basic guidelines for establishing the amount of monthly benefits payable to an eligible individual or couple (as defined in § 416.120(c)(5)). This subpart does not contain provisions with respect to establishing the amount of State supplementary payments payable in accordance with an agreement entered into between a State and the Administration under the provisions of subpart T of this part. Provisions with respect to determination and payment of State supplementary payments under such agreements will be administered by the Administration in accordance with the terms set forth in such agreements.

[39 FR 23053, June 26, 1974]

§ 416.405 Cost-of-living adjustments in benefits.

Whenever benefit amounts under title II of the Act (part 404 of this chapter) are increased by any percentage effective with any month as a result of a determination made under Section 215(i) of the Act, each of the dollar amounts in effect for such month under §§ 416.410, 416.412, and 416.413, as specified in such sections or as previously increased under this section or under any provision of the Act, will be increased. We will increase the unrounded yearly SSI benefit amount by the same percentage by which the title II benefits are being increased based on the Consumer Price Index, or, if greater, the percentage they would be increased if the rise in the Consumer Price Index were currently the basis for the title II increase. (See §§ 404.270-404.277 for an explanation of how the title II cost-of-living adjustment is computed.) If the increased annual SSI benefit amount is not a multiple of $12, it will be rounded to the next lower multiple of $12.

[51 FR 12606, Apr. 21, 1986; 51 FR 16016, Apr. 30, 1986]

§ 416.410 Amount of benefits; eligible individual.

The benefit under this part for an eligible individual (including the eligible individual receiving benefits payable under the § 416.212 provisions) who does not have an eligible spouse, who is not subject to either benefit suspension under § 416.1325 or benefit reduction under § 416.414, and who is not a qualified individual (as defined in § 416.221) shall be payable at the rate of $5,640 per year ($470 per month) effective for the period beginning January 1, 1996. This rate is the result of a 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment (see § 416.405) to the December 1995 rate. For the period January 1, through December 31, 1995, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.8 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $5,496 per year ($458 per month). For the period January 1, through December 31, 1994, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $5,352 per year ($446 per month). The monthly rate is reduced by the amount of the individual's income which is not excluded pursuant to subpart K of this part.

[61 FR 10278, Mar. 13, 1996]

§ 416.412 Amount of benefits; eligible couple.

The benefit under this part for an eligible couple (including couples where one or both members of the couple are receiving benefits payable under the § 416.212 provisions), neither of whom is subject to suspension of benefits based on § 416.1325 or reduction of benefits based on § 416.414 nor is a qualified individual (as defined in § 416.221) shall be payable at the rate of $8,460 per year ($705 per month), effective for the period beginning January 1, 1996. This rate is the result of a 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment (see § 416.405) to the December 1995 rate. For the period January 1, through December 31, 1995, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.8 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $8,224 per year ($687 per month). For the period January 1, through December 31, 1994, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $8,028 per year ($669 per month). The monthly rate is reduced by the amount of the couple's income which is not excluded pursuant to subpart K of this part.

[61 FR 10278, Mar. 13, 1996]

§ 416.413 Amount of benefits; qualified individual.

The benefit under this part for a qualified individual (defined in § 416.221) is payable at the rate for an eligible individual or eligible couple plus an increment for each essential person (defined in § 416.222) in the household, reduced by the amount of countable income of the eligible individual or eligible couple as explained in § 416.420. A qualified individual will receive an increment of $2,820 per year ($235 per month), effective for the period beginning January 1, 1996. This rate is the result of the 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment (see § 416.405) to the December 1995 rate, and is for each essential person (as defined in § 416.222) living in the household of a qualified individual. (See § 416.532.) For the period January 1, through December 31, 1995, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.8 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $2,748 per year ($229 per month). For the period January 1, through December 31, 1994, the rate payable, as increased by the 2.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment, was $2,676 per year ($223 per month). The total benefit rate, including the increment, is reduced by the amount of the individual's or couple's income that is not excluded pursuant to subpart K of this part.

[61 FR 10278, Mar. 13, 1996]

§ 416.414 Amount of benefits; eligible individual or eligible couple in a medical treatment facility.

(a) General rule. Except where the § 416.212 provisions provide for payment of benefits at the rates specified under §§ 416.410 and 416.412, reduced SSI benefits are payable to persons and couples who are in medical treatment facilities where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of their care is paid by a State plan under title XIX of the Social Security Act (Medicaid). This reduced SSI benefit rate applies to persons who are in medical treatment facilities where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost would have been paid by an approved Medicaid State plan but for the application of section 1917(c) of the Social Security Act due to a transfer of assets for less than fair market value. This reduced SSI benefit rate also applies to children under age 18 who are in medical treatment facilities where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of their care is paid by a health insurance policy issued by a private provider of such insurance, or where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of their care is paid for by a combination of Medicaid payments and payments made under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider of such insurance. Persons and couples to whom these reduced benefits apply are -

(1) Those who are otherwise eligible and who are in the medical treatment facility throughout a month. (By throughout a month we mean that you are in the medical treatment facility as of the beginning of the month and stay the entire month. If you are in a medical treatment facility you will be considered to have continuously been staying there if you are transferred from one medical treatment facility to another or if you are temporarily absent for a period of not more than 14 consecutive days.); and

(2) Those who reside for part of a month in a public institution and for the rest of the month are in a public or private medical treatment facility where Medicaid pays or would have paid (but for the application of section 1917(c) of the Act) a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of their care; and

(3) Children under age 18 who reside for part of a month in a public institution and for the rest of the month are in a public or private medical treatment facility where a substantial part (more than 50 percent) of the cost of their care is being paid under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider or by a combination of Medicaid and payments under a health insurance policy issued by a private provider.

(b) The benefit rates are -

(1) Eligible individual. For months after June 1988, the benefit rate for an eligible individual with no eligible spouse is $30 per month. The benefit payment is figured by subtracting the eligible individual's countable income (see subpart K) from the benefit rate as explained in § 416.420.

(2) Eligible couple both of whom are temporarily absent from home in medical treatment facilities as described in § 416.1149(c)(1). For months after June 1988, the benefit rate for a couple is $60 a month. The benefit payment is figured by subtracting the couple's countable income (see subpart K) from the benefit rate as explained in § 416.420.

(3) Eligible couple with one spouse who is temporarily absent from home as described in § 416.1149(c)(1). The couple's benefit rate equals:

(i) For months after June 1988, $30 per month for the spouse in the medical treatment facility; plus

(ii) The benefit rate for an eligible individual (see § 416.410) for the spouse who is not in the medical treatment facility. The benefit payment for each spouse is figured by subtracting each individual's own countable income in the appropriate month (see § 416.420) from his or her portion of the benefit rate shown in paragraphs (b)(3) (i) and (ii).

(c) Definition. For purposes of this section, a medical treatment facility means an institution or that part of an institution that is licensed or otherwise approved by a Federal, State, or local government to provide inpatient medical care and services.

[47 FR 3106, Jan. 22, 1982, as amended at 50 FR 48571, Nov. 26, 1985; 50 FR 51514, Dec. 18, 1985; 54 FR 19164, May 4, 1989; 58 FR 64894, Dec. 10, 1993; 60 FR 16374, Mar. 30, 1995; 61 FR 10278, Mar. 13, 1996; 62 FR 1056, Jan. 8, 1997; 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007; 72 FR 54350, Sept. 25, 2007]

§ 416.415 Amount of benefits; eligible individual is disabled child under age 18.

(a) If you are a disabled child under age 18 and meet the conditions in § 416.1165(i) for waiver of deeming, your parents' income will not be deemed to you and your benefit rate will be $30 a month.

(b) If you are a disabled child under age 18 and do not meet the conditions in § 416.1165(i) only because your parents' income is not high enough to make you ineligible for SSI but deeming of your parents' income would result in an SSI benefit less than the amount payable if you received benefits as a child under § 416.1165(i), your benefit will be the amount payable if you received benefits as a child under § 416.1165(i).

[60 FR 361, Jan. 4, 1995]

§ 416.420 Determination of benefits; general.

Benefits shall be determined for each month. The amount of the monthly payment will be computed by reducing the benefit rate (see §§ 416.410, 416.412, 416.413, and 416.414) by the amount of countable income as figured under the rules in subpart K of this part. The appropriate month's countable income to be used to determine how much your benefit payment will be for the current month (the month for which a benefit is payable) will be determined as follows:

(a) General rule. We generally use the amount of your countable income in the second month prior to the current month to determine how much your benefit amount will be for the current month. We will use the benefit rate (see §§ 416.410 through 416.414), as increased by a cost-of-living adjustment, in determining the value of the one-third reduction or the presumed maximum value, to compute your SSI benefit amount for the first 2 months in which the cost-of-living adjustment is in effect. If you have been receiving an SSI benefit and a Social Security insurance benefit and the latter is increased on the basis of the cost-of-living adjustment or because your benefit is recomputed, we will compute the amount of your SSI benefit for January, the month of an SSI benefit increase, by including in your income the amount by which your Social Security benefit in January exceeds the amount of your Social Security benefit in November. Similarly, we will compute the amount of your SSI benefit for February by including in your income the amount by which your Social Security benefit in February exceeds the amount of your Social Security benefit in December.

Example 1.

Mrs. X's benefit amount is being determined for September (the current month). Mrs. X's countable income in July is used to determine the benefit amount for September.

Example 2.

Mr. Z's SSI benefit amount is being determined for January (the current month). There has been a cost-of-living increase in SSI benefits effective January. Mr. Z's countable income in November is used to determine the benefit amount for January. In November, Mr. Z had in-kind support and maintenance valued at the presumed maximum value as described in § 416.1140(a). We will use the January benefit rate, as increased by the COLA, to determine the value of the in-kind support and maintenance Mr. Z received in November when we determine Mr. Z's SSI benefit amount for January.

Example 3.

Mr. Y's SSI benefit amount is being determined for January (the current month). Mr. Y has Social Security income of $100 in November, $100 in December, and $105 in January. We find the amount by which his Social Security income in January exceeds his Social Security income in November ($5) and add that to his income in November to determine the SSI benefit amount for January.

(b) Exceptions to the general rule -

(1) First month of initial eligibility for payment or the first month of eligibility after a month of ineligibility. We use your countable income in the current month to determine your benefit amount for the first month you are initially eligible for payment of SSI benefits (see § 416.501) or for the first month you again become eligible for SSI benefits after at least a month of ineligibility. Your payment for a first month of reeligibility after at least one-month of ineligibility will be prorated according to the number of days in the month that you are eligible beginning with the date on which you reattain eligibility.

Example:

Mrs. Y applies for SSI benefits in September and meets the requirements for eligibility in that month. (We use Mrs. Y's countable income in September to determine if she is eligible for SSI in September.) The first month for which she can receive payment is October (see § 416.501). We use Mrs. Y's countable income in October to determine the amount of her benefit for October. If Mrs. Y had been receiving SSI benefits through July, became ineligible for SSI benefits in August, and again became eligible for such benefits in September, we would use Mrs. Y's countable income in September to determine the amount of her benefit for September. In addition, the proration rules discussed above would also apply to determine the amount of benefits in September in this second situation.

(2) Second month of initial eligibility for payment or second month of eligibility after a month of ineligibility. We use your countable income in the first month prior to the current month to determine how much your benefit amount will be for the current month when the current month is the second month of initial eligibility for payment or the second month of reeligibility following at least a month of ineligibility. However, if you have been receiving both an SSI benefit and a Social Security insurance benefit and the latter is increased on the basis of the cost-of-living adjustment or because your benefit is recomputed, we will compute the amount of your SSI benefit for January, the month of an SSI benefit increase, by including in your income the amount by which your Social Security benefit in January exceeds the amount of your Social Security benefit in December.

Example:

Mrs. Y was initially eligible for payment of SSI benefits in October. Her benefit amount for November will be based on her countable income in October (first prior month).

(3) Third month of initial eligibility for payment or third month of eligibility after a month of ineligibility. We use your countable income according to the rule set out in paragraph (a) of this section to determine how much your benefit amount will be for the third month of initial eligibility for payment or the third month of reeligibility after at least a month of ineligibility.

Example:

Mrs. Y was initially eligible for payment of SSI benefits in October. Her benefit amount for December will be based on her countable income in October (second prior month).

(4) Income derived from certain assistance payments. We use your income in the current month from the programs listed below to determine your benefit amount for that same month. The assistance programs are as follows:

(i) Aid to Families with Dependent Children under title IV-A of the Social Security Act (the Act);

(ii) Foster Care under title IV-E of the Act;

(iii) Refugee Cash Assistance pursuant to section 412(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act;

(iv) Cuban and Haitian Entrant Assistance pursuant to section 501(a) of Pub. L. 96-422; and

(v) Bureau of Indian Affairs general assistance and child welfare assistance pursuant to 42 Stat. 208 as amended.

(c) Reliable information which is currently available for determining benefits. The Commissioner has determined that no reliable information exists which is currently available to use in determining benefit amounts.

(1) Reliable information. For purposes of this section reliable information means payment information that is maintained on a computer system of records by the government agency determining the payments (e.g., Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Personnel Management for Federal civil service information and the Railroad Retirement Board).

(2) Currently available information. For purposes of this section currently available information means information that is available at such time that it permits us to compute and issue a correct benefit for the month the information is pertinent.

(d) Payment of benefits. See subpart E of this part for the rules on payments and the minimum monthly benefit (as explained in § 416.503).

[50 FR 48571, Nov. 26, 1985; 50 FR 51514, Dec. 18, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 31657, Aug. 1, 1989; 62 FR 30751, June 5, 1997; 63 FR 33546, June 19, 1998; 64 FR 31973, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.421 Determination of benefits; computation of prorated benefits.

(a) In the month that you reacquire eligibility after a month or more of ineligibility (see § 416.1320(b)), your benefit will be prorated according to the number of days in the month that you are eligible beginning with the date on which you meet all eligibility requirements.

(b) In determining the amount of your benefit for a month in which benefits are to be prorated, we first compute the amount of the benefit that you would receive for the month as if proration did not apply. We then determine the date on which you meet all factors of eligibility. (The income limits must be met based on the entire month and the resource limit must be as of the first day of the month.) We then count the number of days in the month beginning with the day on which you first meet all factors of eligibility through the end of the month. We then multiply the amount of your unprorated benefit for the month by the number of days for which you are eligible for benefits and divide that figure by the number of days in the month for which your benefit is being determined. The result is the amount of the benefit that you are due for the month in which benefits are to be prorated.

[51 FR 13493, Apr. 14, 1986, as amended at 64 FR 31973, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.426 Change in status involving an individual; ineligibility occurs.

Whenever benefits are suspended or terminated for an individual because of ineligibility, no benefit is payable for that month.

[50 FR 48571, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.428 Eligible individual without an eligible spouse has an essential person in his home.

When an eligible individual without an eligible spouse has an essential person (as defined in § 416.222 of this part) in his home, the amount by which his rate of payment is increased is determined in accordance with §§ 416.220 through 416.223 and with 416.413 of this part. The essential person's income is deemed to be that of the eligible individual, and the provisions of §§ 416.401 through 416.426 will apply in determining the benefit of such eligible individual.

[39 FR 23053, June 26, 1974, as amended at 51 FR 10616, Mar. 28, 1986; 65 FR 16814, Mar. 30, 2000]

§ 416.430 Eligible individual with eligible spouse; essential person(s) present.

(a) When an eligible individual with an eligible spouse has an essential person (§ 416.222) living in his or her home, or when both such persons each has an essential person, the increase in the rate of payment is determined in accordance with §§ 416.413 and 416.532. The income of the essential person(s) is included in the income of the couple and the payment due will be equally divided between each member of the eligible couple.

(b) When one member of an eligible couple is temporarily absent in accordance with § 416.1149(c)(1) and § 416.222(c) and either one or both individuals has an essential person, add the essential person increment to the benefit rate for the member of the couple who is actually residing with the essential person and include the income of the essential person in that member's income. See § 416.414(b)(3).

[60 FR 16375, Mar. 30, 1995]

§ 416.432 Change in status involving a couple; eligibility continues.

When there is a change in status which involves the formation or dissolution of an eligible couple (for example, marriage, divorce), a redetermination of the benefit amount shall be made for the months subsequent to the month of such formation or dissolution of the couple in accordance with the following rules:

(a) When there is a dissolution of an eligible couple and each member of the couple becomes an eligible individual, the benefit amount for each person shall be determined individually for each month beginning with the first month after the month in which the dissolution occurs. This shall be done by determining the applicable benefit rate for an eligible individual with no eligible spouse according to §§ 416.410 or 416.413 and 416.414 and applying § 416.420(a). See § 416.1147a for the applicable income rules when in-kind support and maintenance is involved.

(b) When two eligible individuals become an eligible couple, the benefit amount will be determined for the couple beginning with the first month following the month of the change. This shall be done by determining which benefit rate to use for an eligible couple according to §§ 416.412 or 416.413 and 416.414 and applying the requirements in § 416.420(a).

[60 FR 16375, Mar. 30, 1995]

§ 416.435 Change in status involving a couple; ineligibility occurs.

Whenever benefits are suspended or terminated for both members of a couple because of ineligibility, no benefits are payable for that month. However, when benefits are suspended or terminated for one member of a couple because of ineligibility for a month, the member who remains eligible assumes the eligibility status of an eligible individual without an eligible spouse for such month and the benefit rate and payment amount will be determined as an eligible individual for the month.

[50 FR 48572, Nov. 26, 1985]

Subpart E - Payment of Benefits, Overpayments, and Underpayments
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1147, 1601, 1602, 1611(c) and (e), and 1631(a)-(d) and (g) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1320b-17, 1381, 1381a, 1382(c) and (e), and 1383(a)-(d) and (g)); 31 U.S.C. 3716; 31 U.S.C. 3720A.

§ 416.501 Payment of benefits: General.

Payment of SSI benefits will be made for the month after the month of initial eligibility and for each subsequent month provided all requirements for eligibility (see § 416.202) and payment (see § 416.420) are met. In the month the individual re-establishes eligibility after at least a month of ineligibility, benefits are paid for such a month beginning with the date in the month on which the individual meets all eligibility requirements. In some months, while the factors of eligibility based on the current month may be established, it is possible to receive no payment for that month if the factors of eligibility for payment are not met. Payment of benefits may not be made for any period that precedes the first month following the date on which an application is filed or, if later, the first month following the date all conditions for eligibility are met.

[64 FR 31973, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.502 Manner of payment.

For the month an individual reestablishes eligibility after a month of ineligibility, an SSI payment will be made on or after the day of the month on which the individual becomes reeligible to receive benefits. In all other months, a payment will be made on the first day of each month and represents payment for that month. If the first day of the month falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, payments will be made on the first day preceding such day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. Unless otherwise indicated, the monthly amount for an eligible couple will be divided equally and paid separately to each individual. Section 416.520 explains emergency advance payments.

[55 FR 4422, Feb. 8, 1990, as amended at 64 FR 31974, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.503 Minimum monthly benefit amount.

If you receive an SSI benefit that does not include a State supplement the minimum monthly SSI benefit amount payable is $1. When an SSI benefit amount of less than $1 is payable, the benefit amount will be increased to $1. If you receive an SSI benefit that does include a State supplement and the SSI benefit amount is less than $1 but when added to the State supplement exceeds $1, the SSI benefit amount will not be increased to $1. Rather, we pay the actual amount of the SSI benefit plus the State supplement.

[50 FR 48572, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.520 Emergency advance payments.

(a) General. We may pay a one-time emergency advance payment to an individual initially applying for benefits who is presumptively eligible for SSI benefits and who has a financial emergency. The amount of this payment cannot exceed the Federal benefit rate (see §§ 416.410 through 416.414) plus the federally administered State supplementary payment, if any (see § 416.2020), which apply for the month for which the payment is made. Emergency advance payment is defined in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. The actual payment amount is computed as explained in paragraph (c) of this section. An emergency advance payment is an advance of benefits expected to be due that is recoverable as explained in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section.

(b) Definition of terms. For purposes of this subpart -

(1) Emergency advance payment means a direct, expedited payment by a Social Security Administration field office to an individual or spouse who is initially applying (see paragraph (b)(3) of this section), who is at least presumptively eligible (see paragraph (b)(4) of this section), and who has a financial emergency (see paragraph (b)(2) of this section).

(2) Financial emergency is the financial status of an individual who has insufficient income or resources to meet an immediate threat to health or safety, such as the lack of food, clothing, shelter, or medical care.

(3) Initially applying means the filing of an application (see § 416.310) which requires an initial determination of eligibility, such as the first application for SSI benefits or an application filed subsequent to a prior denial or termination of a prior period of eligibility for payment. An individual or spouse who previously received an emergency advance payment in a prior period of eligibility which terminated may again receive such a payment if he or she reapplies for SSI and meets the other conditions for an emergency advance payment under this section.

(4) Presumptively eligible is the status of an individual or spouse who presents strong evidence of the likelihood of meeting all of the requirements for eligibility including the income and resources tests of eligibility (see subparts K and L of this part), categorical eligibility (age, disability, or blindness), and technical eligibility (United States residency and citizenship or alien status - see subpart P of this part).

(c) Computation of payment amount. To compute the emergency advance payment amount, the maximum amount described in paragraph (a) of this section is compared to both the expected amount payable for the month for which the payment is made (see paragraph (c)(1) of this section) and the amount the applicant requested to meet the emergency. The actual payment amount is no more than the least of these three amounts.

(1) In computing the emergency advance payment amount, we apply the monthly income counting rules appropriate for the month for which the advance is paid, as explained in § 416.420. Generally, the month for which the advance is paid is the month in which it is paid. However, if the advance is paid in the month the application is filed, the month for which the advance is paid is considered to be the first month of expected eligibility for payment of benefits.

(2) For a couple, we separately compute each member's emergency advance payment amount.

(d) Recovery of emergency advance payment where eligibility is established. When an individual or spouse is determined to be eligible and retroactive payments are due, any emergency advance payment amounts are recovered in full from the first payment(s) certified to the United States Treasury. However, if no retroactive payments are due and benefits are only due in future months, any emergency advance payment amounts are recovered through proportionate reductions in those benefits over a period of not more than 6 months. (See paragraph (e) of this section if the individual or spouse is determined to be ineligible.)

(e) Disposition of emergency advance payments where eligibility is not established. If a presumptively eligible individual (or spouse) or couple is determined to be ineligible, the emergency advance payment constitutes a recoverable overpayment. (See the exception in § 416.537(b)(1) when payment is made on the basis of presumptive disability or presumptive blindness.)

[55 FR 4422, Feb. 8, 1990; 55 FR 7411, Mar. 1, 1990, as amended at 64 FR 31974, June 15, 1999]

§ 416.525 Reimbursement to States for interim assistance payments.

Notwithstanding § 416.542, the Social Security Administration may, in accordance with the provisions of subpart S of this part, withhold supplemental security income benefits due with respect to an individual and may pay to a State (or political subdivision thereof, if agreed to by the Social Security Administration and the State) from the benefits withheld, an amount sufficient to reimburse the State (or political subdivision) for interim assistance furnished on behalf of the individual.

[41 FR 20872, May 21, 1976]

§ 416.532 Method of payment when the essential person resides with more than one eligible person.

(a) When an essential person lives with an eligible individual and an eligible spouse, the State may report that the person is essential to one or both members of the couple. In either event, the income and resources of the essential person will be considered to be available to the family unit. The payment increment attributable to the essential person will be added to the rate of payment for the couple, the countable income subtracted, and the resulting total benefit divided equally between the eligible individual and the eligible spouse.

(b) Where the essential person lives with two eligible individuals (as opposed to an eligible individual and eligible spouse), one of whom has been designated the qualified individual, the income and resources of the essential person will be considered to be available only to the qualified individual (as defined in § 416.221) and any increase in payment will be made to such qualified individual.

(c) In those instances where the State has designated the essential person as essential to two or more eligible individuals so that both are qualified individuals, the payment increment attributable to the essential person must be shared equally, and the income and resources of the essential person divided and counted equally against each qualified individual.

(d) When an essential person lives with an eligible individual and an eligible spouse (or two or more eligible individuals) only one of whom is the qualified individual, essential person status is not automatically retained upon the death of the qualified individual or upon the separation from the qualified individual. A review of the State records established on or before December 31, 1973, will provide the basis for a determination as to whether the remaining eligible individual or eligible spouse meets the definition of qualified individual. Payment in consideration of the essential person will be dependent on whether the essential person continues to live with a qualified individual. If the essential person does reside with a qualified individual, status as an essential person is retained.

[39 FR 33796, Sept. 20, 1974, as amended at 50 FR 48572, Nov. 26, 1985; 51 FR 10616, Mar. 28, 1986; 60 FR 16375, Mar. 30, 1995]

§ 416.533 Transfer or assignment of benefits.

Except as provided in § 416.525 and subpart S of this part, the Social Security Administration will not certify payment of supplemental security income benefits to a transferee or assignee of a person eligible for such benefits under the Act or of a person qualified for payment under § 416.542. The Social Security Administration shall not certify payment of supplemental security income benefits to any person claiming such payment by virtue of an execution, levy, attachment, garnishment, or other legal process or by virtue of any bankruptcy or insolvency proceeding against or affecting the person eligible for benefits under the Act.

[41 FR 20873, May 21, 1976, as amended at 58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993]

§ 416.534 Garnishment of payments after disbursement.

(a) Payments that are covered by section 1631(d)(1) of the Social Security Act and made by direct deposit are subject to 31 CFR part 212, Garnishment of Accounts Containing Federal Benefit Payments.

(b) This section may be amended only by a rulemaking issued jointly by the Department of Treasury and the agencies defined as a “benefit agency” in 31 CFR 212.3.

[76 FR 9961, Feb. 23, 2011]

§ 416.535 Underpayments and overpayments.

(a) General. When an individual receives SSI benefits of less than the correct amount, adjustment is effected as described in §§ 416.542 and 416.543, and the additional rules in § 416.545 may apply. When an individual receives more than the correct amount of SSI benefits, adjustment is effected as described in § 416.570. Refund of overpayments is discussed in § 416.560 and waiver of recovery of overpayments is discussed in §§ 416.550 through 416.555.

(b) Additional rules for individuals whose drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability. When an individual whose drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability, as described in § 416.935, receives less than the correct amount of SSI benefits, adjustment is effected as described in §§ 416.542 and 416.543 and the additional rule described in § 416.544 applies.

(c) Additional rules for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. When an eligible individual under age 18 has a representative payee and receives less than the correct amount of SSI benefits, the additional rules in § 416.546 may apply.

(d) Additional rules for eligible aliens and for their sponsors. When an individual who is an alien is overpaid SSI benefits during the 3-year period in which deeming from a sponsor applies (see § 416.1160(a)(3)), the sponsor and the alien may be jointly and individually liable for repayment of the overpayment. The sponsor is liable for the overpayment if he or she failed to report correct information that affected the alien's eligibility or payment amount. This means information about the income and resources of the sponsor and, if they live together, of the sponsor's spouse. However, the sponsor is not liable for repayment if the sponsor was without fault or had good cause for failing to report correctly. A special rule that applies to adjustment of other benefits due the alien and the sponsor to recover an overpayment is described in § 416.570(b).

(e) Sponsor without fault or good cause exists for failure to report. Without fault or good cause will be found to exist if the failure to report was not willful. To establish willful failure, the evidence must show that the sponsor knowingly failed to supply pertinent information regarding his or her income and resources.

[52 FR 8881, Mar. 20, 1987, as amended at 60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995; 61 FR 67205, Dec. 20, 1996]

§ 416.536 Underpayments - defined.

An underpayment can occur only with respect to a period for which a recipient filed an application, if required, for benefits and met all conditions of eligibility for benefits. An underpayment, including any amounts of State supplementary payments which are due and administered by the Social Security Administration, is:

(a) Nonpayment, where payment was due but was not made; or

(b) Payment of less than the amount due. For purposes of this section, payment has been made when certified by the Social Security Administration to the Department of the Treasury, except that payment has not been made where payment has not been received by the designated payee, or where payment was returned.

[58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993]

§ 416.537 Overpayments - defined.

(a) Overpayments. As used in this subpart, the term overpayment means payment of more than the amount due for any period, including any amounts of State supplementary payments which are due and administered by the Social Security Administration. For purposes of this section, payment has been made when certified by the Social Security Administration to the Department of the Treasury, except that payment has not been made where payment has not been received by the designated payee, or where payment was returned. When a payment of more than the amount due is made by direct deposit to a financial institution to or on behalf of an individual who has died, and the financial institution credits the payment to a joint account of the deceased individual and another person who is the surviving spouse of the deceased individual and was eligible for a payment under title XVI of the Act (including any State supplementation payment paid by the Commissioner) as an eligible spouse (or as either member of an eligible couple) for the month in which the deceased individual died, the amount of the payment in excess of the correct amount will be an overpayment to the surviving spouse.

(b) Actions which are not overpayments -

(1) Presumptive disability and presumptive blindness. Any payment made for any month, including an advance payment of benefits under § 416.520, is not an overpayment to the extent it meets the criteria for payment under § 416.931. Payments made on the basis of presumptive disability or presumptive blindness will not be considered overpayments where ineligibility is determined because the individual or eligible spouse is not disabled or blind. However, where it is determined that all or a portion of the presumptive payments made are incorrect for reasons other than disability or blindness, these incorrect payments are considered overpayments (as defined in paragraph (a) of this section). Overpayments may occur, for example, when the person who received payments on the basis of presumptive disability or presumptive blindness is determined to be ineligible for all or any part of the payments because of excess resources or is determined to have received excess payment for those months based on an incorrect estimate of income.

(2) Penalty. The imposition of a penalty pursuant to § 416.724 is not an adjustment of an overpayment and is imposed only against any amount due the penalized recipient, or, after death, any amount due the deceased which otherwise would be paid to a survivor as defined in § 416.542.

(c) Pandemic period. As used throughout this subpart, the term pandemic period for the purposes of the waiver authority in § 416.550 refers exclusively to the period of time beginning on March 1, 2020, and ending on September 30, 2020.

[40 FR 47763, Oct. 10, 1975, as amended at 43 FR 17354, Apr. 24, 1978; 50 FR 48572, Nov. 26, 1985; 55 FR 7313, Mar. 1, 1990; 58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997; 85 FR 52915, Aug. 27, 2020]

§ 416.538 Amount of underpayment or overpayment.

(a) General. The amount of an underpayment or overpayment is the difference between the amount paid to a recipient and the amount of payment actually due such recipient for a given period. An underpayment or overpayment period begins with the first month for which there is a difference between the amount paid and the amount actually due for that month. The period ends with the month the initial determination of overpayment or underpayment is made. With respect to the period established, there can be no underpayment to a recipient or his or her eligible spouse if more than the correct amount payable under title XVI of the Act has been paid, whether or not adjustment or recovery of any overpayment for that period to the recipient or his or her eligible spouse has been waived under the provisions of §§ 416.550 through 416.556. A subsequent initial determination of overpayment will require no change with respect to a prior determination of overpayment or to the period relating to such determination to the extent that the basis of the prior overpayment remains the same.

(b) Limited delay in payment of underpaid amount to recipient or eligible surviving spouse. Where an apparent overpayment has been detected but determination of the overpayment has not been made (see § 416.558(a)), a determination of an underpayment and payment of an underpaid amount which is otherwise due cannot be delayed to a recipient or eligible surviving spouse unless a determination with respect to the apparent overpayment can be made before the close of the month following the month in which the underpaid amount was discovered.

(c) Delay in payment of underpaid amount to ineligible individual or survivor. A determination of an underpayment and payment of an underpaid amount which is otherwise due an individual who is no longer eligible for SSI or is payable to a survivor pursuant to § 416.542(b) will be delayed for the resolution of all overpayments, incorrect payments, adjustments, and penalties.

(d) Limited delay in payment of underpaid amount to eligible individual under age 18 who has a representative payee. When the representative payee of an eligible individual under age 18 is required to establish a dedicated account pursuant to §§ 416.546 and 416.640(e), payment of past-due benefits which are otherwise due will be delayed until the representative payee has established the dedicated account as described in § 416.640(e). Once the account is established, SSA will deposit the past-due benefits payable directly to the account.

(e) Reduction of underpaid amount. Any underpayment amount otherwise payable to a survivor on account of a deceased recipient is reduced by the amount of any outstanding penalty imposed against the benefits payable to such deceased recipient or survivor under section 1631(e) of the Act (see § 416.537(b)(2)).

[58 FR 52912, Oct. 13, 1993, as amended at 61 FR 67205, Dec. 20, 1996]

§ 416.542 Underpayments - to whom underpaid amount is payable.

(a) Underpaid recipient alive - underpayment payable.

(1) If an underpaid recipient is alive, the amount of any underpayment due him or her will be paid to him or her in a separate payment or by increasing the amount of his or her monthly payment. If the underpaid amount meets the formula in § 416.545 and one of the exceptions does not apply, the amount of any past-due benefits will be paid in installments.

(2) If an underpaid recipient whose drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability (as described in § 416.935) is alive, the amount of any underpayment due the recipient will be paid through his or her representative payee in installment payments. No underpayment may be paid directly to the recipient. If the recipient dies before we have paid all benefits due through his or her representative payee, we will follow the rules which apply to underpayments for the payment of any remaining amounts due to any eligible survivor of a deceased recipient as described in paragraph (b) of this section.

(3) If an underpaid individual under age 18 is alive and has a representative payee and is due past-due benefits which meet the formula in § 416.546, SSA will pay the past-due benefits into the dedicated account described in § 416.640(e). If the underpaid individual dies before the benefits have been deposited into the account, we will follow the rules which apply to underpayments for the payment of any unpaid amount due to any eligible survivor of a deceased individual as described in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Underpaid recipient deceased - underpaid amount payable to survivor.

(1) If a recipient dies before we have paid all benefits due or before the recipient endorses the check for the correct payment, we may pay the amount due to the deceased recipient's surviving eligible spouse or to his or her surviving spouse who was living with the underpaid recipient within the meaning of section 202(i) of the Act (see § 404.347) in the month he or she died or within 6 months immediately preceding the month of death.

(2) If the deceased underpaid recipient was a disabled or blind child when the underpayment occurred, the underpaid amount may be paid to the natural or adoptive parent(s) of the underpaid recipient who lived with the underpaid recipient in the month he or she died or within the 6 months preceding death. We consider the underpaid recipient to have been living with the natural or adoptive parent(s) in the period if the underpaid recipient satisfies the “living with” criteria we use when applying § 416.1165 or would have satisfied the criteria had his or her death not precluded the application of such criteria throughout a month.

(3) If the deceased individual was living with his or her spouse within the meaning of section 202(i) of the Act in the month of death or within 6 months immediately preceding the month of death, and was also living with his or her natural or adoptive parent(s) in the month of death or within 6 months preceding the month of death, we will pay the parent(s) any SSI underpayment due the deceased individual for months he or she was a blind or disabled child and we will pay the spouse any SSI underpayment due the deceased individual for months he or she no longer met the definition of “child” as set forth at § 416.1856. If no parent(s) can be paid in such cases due to death or other reason, then we will pay the SSI underpayment due the deceased individual for months he or she was a blind or disabled child to the spouse.

(4) No benefits may be paid to the estate of any underpaid recipient, the estate of the surviving spouse, the estate of a parent, or to any survivor other than those listed in paragraph (b) (1) through (3) of this section. Payment of an underpaid amount to an ineligible spouse or surviving parent(s) may only be made for benefits payable for months after May 1986. Payment to surviving parent(s) may be made only for months of eligibility during which the deceased underpaid recipient was a child. We will not pay benefits to a survivor other than the eligible spouse who requests payment of an underpaid amount more than 24 months after the month of the individual's death.

(c) Underpaid recipient's death caused by an intentional act. No benefits due the deceased individual may be paid to a survivor found guilty by a court of competent jurisdiction of intentionally causing the underpaid recipient's death.

[40 FR 47763, Oct. 10, 1975, as amended at 58 FR 52913, Oct. 13, 1993; 60 FR 8149, Feb. 10, 1995; 61 FR 67206, Dec. 20, 1996]

§ 416.543 Underpayments - applied to reduce overpayments.

We apply any underpayment due an individual to reduce any overpayment to that individual that we determine to exist (see § 416.558) for a different period, unless we have waived recovery of the overpayment under the provisions of §§ 416.550 through 416.556. Similarly, when an underpaid recipient dies, we first apply any amounts due the deceased recipient that would be payable to a survivor under § 416.542(b) against any overpayment to the survivor unless we have waived recovery of such overpayment under the provisions of §§ 416.550 through 416.556.

Example:

A disabled child, eligible for payments under title XVI, and his parent, also an eligible individual receiving payments under title XVI, were living together. The disabled child dies at a time when he was underpaid $100. The deceased child's underpaid benefit is payable to the surviving parent. However, since the parent must repay an SSI overpayment of $225 on his own record, the $100 underpayment will be applied to reduce the parent's own overpayment to $125.

[58 FR 52913, Oct. 13, 1993]

§ 416.544 Paying benefits in installments: Drug addiction or alcoholism.

(a) General. For disabled recipients who receive benefit payments through a representative payee because drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability, certain amounts due the recipient for a past period will be paid in installments. The amounts subject to payment in installments include:

(1) Benefits due but unpaid which accrued prior to the month payment was effectuated;

(2) Benefits due but unpaid which accrued during a period of suspension for which the recipient was subsequently determined to have been eligible; and

(3) Any adjustment to benefits which results in an accrual of unpaid benefits.

(b) Installment formula. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the amount of the installment payment in any month is limited so that the sum of

(1) the amount due for a past period (and payable under paragraph (a) of this section) paid in such month and

(2) the amount of any current benefit due cannot exceed twice the Federal Benefit Rate plus any federally-administered State supplementation payable to an eligible individual for the preceding month.

(c) Exception to installment limitation. An exception to the installment payment limitation in paragraph (b) of this section can be granted for the first month in which a recipient accrues benefit amounts subject to payment in installments if the recipient has unpaid housing expenses which result in a high risk of homelessness for the recipient. In that case, the benefit payment may be increased by the amount of the unpaid housing expenses so long as that increase does not exceed the amount of benefits which accrued during the most recent period of nonpayment. We consider a person to be at risk of homelessness if continued nonpayment of the outstanding housing expenses is likely to result in the person losing his or her place to live or if past nonpayment of housing expenses has resulted in the person having no appropriate personal place to live. In determining whether this exception applies, we will ask for evidence of outstanding housing expenses that shows that the person is likely to lose or has already lost his or her place to live. For purposes of this section, homelessness is the state of not being under the control of any public institution and having no appropriate personal place to live. Housing expenses include charges for all items required to maintain shelter (for example, mortgage payments, rent, heating fuel, and electricity).

(d) Payment through a representative payee. If the recipient does not have a representative payee, payment of amounts subject to installments cannot be made until a representative payee is selected.

(e) Underpaid recipient no longer eligible. In the case of a recipient who is no longer currently eligible for monthly payments, but to whom amounts defined in paragraph (a) of this section are still owing, we will continue to make installment payments of such benefits through a representative payee.

(f) Recipient currently not receiving SSI benefits because of suspension for noncompliance with treatment. If a recipient is currently not receiving SSI benefits because his or her benefits have been suspended for noncompliance with treatment (as defined in § 416.936), the payment of amounts under paragraph (a) of this section will stop until the recipient has demonstrated compliance with treatment as described in § 416.1326 and will again commence with the first month the recipient begins to receive benefits.

(g) Underpaid recipient deceased. Upon the death of a recipient, any remaining unpaid amounts as defined in paragraph (a) of this section will be treated as underpayments in accordance with § 416.542(b).

[60 FR 8150, Feb. 10, 1995]

§ 416.545 Paying large past-due benefits in installments.

(a) General. Except as described in paragraph (c) of this section, when an individual is eligible for past-due benefits in an amount which meets the formula in paragraph (b) of this section, payment of these benefits must be made in installments. If an individual becomes eligible for past-due benefits for a different period while installments are being made, we will notify the individual of the amount due and issue these benefits in the last installment payment. The amounts subject to payment in installments include:

(1) Benefits due but unpaid which accrued prior to the month payment was effectuated;

(2) Benefits due but unpaid which accrued during a period of suspension for which the recipient was subsequently determined to have been eligible; and

(3) Any adjustment to benefits which results in an accrual of unpaid benefits.

(b) Installment formula. Installment payments must be made if the amount of the past-due benefits, including any federally administered State supplementation, after applying § 416.525 (reimbursement to States for interim assistance) and applying § 416.1520 (payment of attorney fees), equals or exceeds 3 times the Federal Benefit Rate plus any federally administered State supplementation payable in a month to an eligible individual (or eligible individual and eligible spouse). These installment payments will be paid in not more than 3 installments and made at 6-month intervals. Except as described in paragraph (d) of this section, the amount of each of the first and second installment payments may not exceed the threshold amount of 3 times the maximum monthly benefit payable as described in this paragraph.

(c) Exception - When installments payments are not required. Installment payments are not required and the rules in this section do not apply if, when the determination of an underpayment is made, the individual is

(1) afflicted with a medically determinable impairment which is expected to result in death within 12 months, or

(2) ineligible for benefits and we determine that he or she is likely to remain ineligible for the next 12 months.

(d) Exception - Increased first and second installment payments.

(1) The amount of the first and second installment payments may be increased by the total amount of the following debts and expenses:

(i) Outstanding debt for food, clothing, shelter, or medically necessary services, supplies or equipment, or medicine; or

(ii) Current or anticipated expenses in the near future for medically necessary services, supplies or equipment, or medicine, or for the purchase of a home.

(2) The increase described in paragraph (d)(1) of this section only applies to debts or expenses that are not subject to reimbursement by a public assistance program, the Secretary of Health and Human Services under title XVIII of the Act, a State plan approved under title XIX of the Act, or any private entity that is legally liable for payment in accordance with an insurance policy, pre-paid plan, or other arrangement.

[61 FR 67206, Dec. 20, 1996, as amended at 76 FR 453, Jan. 5, 2011; 79 FR 33685, June 12, 2014]

§ 416.546 Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee.

For purposes of this section, amounts subject to payment into dedicated accounts (see § 416.640(e)) include the amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3).

(a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has a representative payee and who is determined to be eligible for past-due benefits (including any federally administered State supplementation) in an amount which, after applying § 416.525 (reimbursement to States for interim assistance) and § 416.1520 (payment of attorney fee), exceeds six times the Federal Benefit Rate plus any federally administered State supplementation payable in a month, this unpaid amount must be paid into the dedicated account established and maintained as described in § 416.640(e).

(b) After the account is established, the representative payee may (but is not required to) deposit into the account any subsequent funds representing past-due benefits under this title to the individual which are equal to or exceed the maximum Federal Benefit Rate (including any federally administered State supplementation).

(c) If the underpaid individual dies before all the benefits due have been deposited into the dedicated account, we will follow the rules which apply to underpayments for the payment of any unpaid amount due to any eligible survivor as described in § 416.542(b).

[61 FR 67206, Dec. 20, 1996, as amended at 76 FR 453, Jan. 5, 2011]

§ 416.550 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - when applicable.

Waiver of adjustment or recovery of an overpayment of SSI benefits may be granted when (EXCEPTION: This section does not apply to a sponsor of an alien):

(a) The overpaid individual was without fault in connection with an overpayment, and

(b) Adjustment or recovery of such overpayment would either:

(1) Defeat the purpose of title XVI, or

(2) Be against equity and good conscience, or

(3) Impede efficient or effective administration of title XVI due to the small amount involved.

(c) We will apply the procedures in this paragraph (c) when an individual requests waiver of all or part of a qualifying overpayment.

(1) For purposes of this paragraph (c), a qualifying overpayment is one that accrued during the pandemic period (see § 416.537(c)) because of the actions that we took in response to the COVID-19 national public health emergency, including the suspension of certain of our manual workloads that would have processed actions identifying and stopping certain overpayments.

(2) Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, we will presume that an individual who requests waiver of a qualifying overpayment is without fault in causing the overpayment (see § 416.552) unless we determine that the qualifying overpayment made to a beneficiary or a representative payee was the result of fraud or similar fault or involved misuse of benefits by a representative payee (see § 416.641).

(3) If we determine under paragraph (c)(2) of this section that an individual or a representative payee is without fault in causing a qualifying overpayment, we will also determine that recovery of the qualifying overpayment would be against equity and good conscience. For purposes of this paragraph (c)(3) only, “against equity and good conscience” is not limited to the meaning used in § 416.554 but means a broad concept of fairness that takes into account all of the facts and circumstances of the case.

(4) The provisions of this paragraph (c)(4) will apply to a qualifying overpayment identified by December 31, 2020.

[52 FR 8882, Mar. 20, 1987, as amended at 53 FR 16543, May 10, 1988; 85 FR 52915, Aug. 27, 2020]

§ 416.551 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - effect of.

Waiver of adjustment or recovery of an overpayment from the overpaid person himself (or, after his death, from his estate) frees him and his eligible spouse from the obligation to repay the amount of the overpayment covered by the waiver. Waiver of adjustment or recovery of an overpayment from anyone other than the overpaid person himself or his estate (e.g., a surviving eligible spouse) does not preclude adjustment or recovery against the overpaid person or his estate.

Example:

The recipient was overpaid $390. It was found that the overpaid recipient was eligible for waiver of adjustment or recovery of $260 of that amount, and such action was taken. Only $130 of the overpayment remained to be recovered by adjustment, refund, or the like.

[40 FR 47763, Oct. 10, 1975]

§ 416.552 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - without fault.

Without fault relates only to the situation of the individual seeking relief from adjustment or recovery of an overpayment. The overpaid individual (and any other individual from whom the Social Security Administration seeks to recover the overpayment) is not relieved of liability and is not without fault solely because the Social Security Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, we will not determine any overpaid individual to be at fault in causing a qualifying overpayment (see § 416.550(c)(1)) unless we determine that the qualifying overpayment made to an individual or a representative payee during the pandemic period (see § 416.537(c)) was the result of fraud or similar fault or involved misuse of benefits by a representative payee (see § 416.641). In determining whether an individual is without fault, the fault of the overpaid person and the fault of the individual seeking relief under the waiver provision are considered. Whether an individual is without fault depends on all the pertinent circumstances surrounding the overpayment in the particular case. The Social Security Administration considers the individual's understanding of the reporting requirements, the agreement to report events affecting payments, knowledge of the occurrence of events that should have been reported, efforts to comply with the reporting requirements, opportunities to comply with the reporting requirements, understanding of the obligation to return checks which were not due, and ability to comply with the reporting requirements (e.g., age, comprehension, memory, physical and mental condition). In determining whether an individual is without fault based on a consideration of these factors, the Social Security Administration will take into account any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language) the individual may have. Although the finding depends on all of the circumstances in the particular case, an individual will be found to have been at fault in connection with an overpayment when an incorrect payment resulted from one of the following:

(a) Failure to furnish information which the individual knew or should have known was material;

(b) An incorrect statement made by the individual which he knew or should have known was incorrect (this includes the individual's furnishing his opinion or conclusion when he was asked for facts), or

(c) The individual did not return a payment which he knew or could have been expected to know was incorrect.

[40 FR 47763, Oct. 10, 1975, as amended at 59 FR 1636, Jan. 12, 1994; 85 FR 52915, Aug. 27, 2020]

§ 416.553 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - defeat the purpose of the supplemental security income program.

We will waive adjustment or recovery of an overpayment when an individual on whose behalf waiver is being considered is without fault (as defined in § 416.552) and adjustment or recovery of the overpayment would defeat the purpose of the supplemental security income program.

(a) General rule. We consider adjustment or recovery of an overpayment to defeat the purpose of the supplemental security income (SSI) program if the individual's income and resources are needed for ordinary and necessary living expenses under the criteria set out in § 404.508(a) of this chapter

(b) Alternative criteria for individuals currently eligible for SSI benefits. We consider an individual or couple currently eligible for SSI benefits to have met the test in paragraph (a) of this section if the individual's or couple's current monthly income (that is, the income upon which the individual's or couple's eligibility for the current month is determined) does not exceed -

(1) The applicable Federal monthly benefit rate for the month in which the determination of waiver is made (see subpart D of this part); plus

(2) The $20 monthly general income exclusion described in §§ 416.1112(c)(3) and 416.1124(c)(10); plus

(3) The monthly earned income exclusion described in § 416.1112(c)(4); plus

(4) The applicable State supplementary payment, if any (see subpart T of this part) for the month in which determination of waiver is made.

For those SSI recipients whose income exceeds these criteria, we follow the general rule in paragraph (a) of this section.

[45 FR 72649, Nov. 3, 1980, as amended at 50 FR 48573, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.554 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - against equity and good conscience.

We will waive adjustment or recovery of an overpayment when an individual on whose behalf waiver is being considered is without fault (as defined in § 416.552) and adjustment or recovery would be against equity and good conscience. Adjustment or recovery is considered to be against equity and good conscience if an individual changed his or her position for the worse or relinquished a valuable right because of reliance upon a notice that payment would be made or because of the incorrect payment itself. In addition, adjustment or recovery is considered to be against equity and good conscience for an individual who is a member of an eligible couple that is legally separated and/or living apart for that part of an overpayment not received, but subject to recovery under § 416.570.

Example 1:

Upon being notified that he was eligible for supplemental security income payments, an individual signed a lease on an apartment renting for $15 a month more than the room he had previously occupied. It was subsequently found that eligibility for the payment should not have been established. In such a case, recovery would be considered “against equity and good conscience.”

Example 2:

An individual fails to take advantage of a private or organization charity, relying instead on the award of supplemental security income payments to support himself. It was subsequently found that the money was improperly paid. Recovery would be considered “against equity and good conscience.”

Example 3:

Mr. and Mrs. Smith - members of an eligible couple - separate in July. Later in July, Mr. Smith receives earned income resulting in an overpayment to both. Mrs. Smith is found to be without fault in causing the overpayment. Recovery from Mrs. Smith of Mr. Smith's part of the couple's overpayment is waived as being against equity and good conscience. Whether recovery of Mr. Smith's portion of the couple's overpayment can be waived will be evaluated separately.

[60 FR 16375, Mar. 30, 1995]

§ 416.555 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - impede administration.

Waiver of adjustment or recovery is proper when the overpaid person on whose behalf waiver is being considered is without fault, as defined in § 416.552, and adjustment or recovery would impede efficient or effective administration of title XVI due to the small amount involved. The amount of overpayment determined to meet such criteria is measured by the current average administrative cost of handling such overpayment case through such adjustment or recovery processes. In determining whether the criterion is met, the overpaid person's financial circumstances are not considered.

[40 FR 47764, Oct. 10, 1975]

§ 416.556 Waiver of adjustment or recovery - countable resources in excess of the limits prescribed in § 416.1205 by $50 or less.

(a) If any overpayment with respect to an individual (or an individual and his or her spouse if any) is attributable solely to the ownership or possession by the individual (and spouse if any) of countable resources having a value which exceeds the applicable dollar figure specified in § 416.1205 by an amount of $50.00 or less, including those resources deemed to an individual in accordance with § 416.1202, such individual (and spouse if any) shall be deemed to have been without fault in connection with the overpayment, and waiver of adjustment or recovery will be made, unless the failure to report the value of the excess resources correctly and in a timely manner was willful and knowing.

(b) Failure to report the excess resources correctly and in a timely manner will be considered to be willful and knowing and the individual will be found to be at fault when the evidence clearly shows the individual (and spouse if any) was fully aware of the requirements of the law and of the excess resources and chose to conceal these resources. When an individual incurred a similar overpayment in the past and received an explanation and instructions at the time of the previous overpayment, we will generally find the individual to be at fault. However, in determining whether the individual is at fault, we will consider all aspects of the current and prior overpayment situations, and where we determine the individual is not at fault, we will waive adjustment or recovery of the subsequent overpayment. In making any determination or decision under this section concerning whether an individual is at fault, including a determination or decision of whether the failure to report the excess resources correctly and in a timely manner was willful and knowing, we will take into account any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language) of the individual (and spouse if any).

[53 FR 16544, May 10, 1988, as amended at 59 FR 1636, Jan. 12, 1994]

§ 416.557 Personal conference.

(a) If waiver cannot be approved (i.e., the requirements in § 416.550 (a) and (b) are not met), the individual is notified in writing and given the dates, times and place of the file review and personal conference; the procedure for reviewing the claims file prior to the personal conference; the procedure for seeking a change in the scheduled date, time and/or place; and all other information necessary to fully inform the individual about the personal conference. The file review is always scheduled at least 5 days before the personal conference. We will offer to the individual the option of conducting the personal conference face-to-face at a place we designate, by telephone, or by video teleconference. The notice will advise the individual of the date and time of the personal conference.

(b) At the file review, the individual and the individual's representative have the right to review the claims file and applicable law and regulations with the decisionmaker or another of our representatives who is prepared to answer questions. We will provide copies of material related to the overpayment and/or waiver from the claims file or pertinent sections of the law or regulations that are requested by the individual or the individual's representative.

(c) At the personal conference, the individual is given the opportunity to:

(1) Appear personally, testify, cross-examine any witnesses, and make arguments;

(2) Be represented by an attorney or other representative (see § 416.1500), although the individual must be present at the conference; and

(3) Submit documents for consideration by the decisionmaker.

(d) At the personal conference, the decisionmaker:

(1) Tells the individual that the decisionmaker was not previously involved in the issue under review, that the waiver decision is solely the decisionmaker's, and that the waiver decision is based only on the evidence or information presented or reviewed at the conference;

(2) Ascertains the role and identity of everyone present;

(3) Indicates whether or not the individual reviewed the claims file;

(4) Explains the provisions of law and regulations applicable to the issue;

(5) Briefly summarizes the evidence already in file which will be considered;

(6) Ascertains from the individual whether the information presented is correct and whether he/she fully understands it;

(7) Allows the individual and the individual's representative, if any, to present the individual's case;

(8) Secures updated financial information and verification, if necessary;

(9) Allows each witness to present information and allows the individual and the individual's representative to question each witness;

(10) Ascertains whether there is any further evidence to be presented;

(11) Reminds the individual of any evidence promised by the individual which has not been presented;

(12) Lets the individual and the individual's representative, if any, present any proposed summary or closing statement;

(13) Explains that a decision will be made and the individual will be notified in writing; and

(14) Explains repayment options and further appeal rights in the event the decision is adverse to the individual.

(e) SSA issues a written decision to the individual (and his or her representative, if any) specifying the findings of fact and conclusions in support of the decision to approve or deny waiver and advising of the individual's right to appeal the decision. If waiver is denied, adjustment or recovery of the overpayment begins even if the individual appeals.

(f) If it appears that the waiver cannot be approved, and the individual declines a personal conference or fails to appear for a second scheduled personal conference, a decision regarding the waiver will be made based on the written evidence of record. Reconsideration is the next step in the appeals process.

[73 FR 1973, Jan. 11, 2008]

§ 416.558 Notice relating to overpayments and underpayments.

(a) Notice of overpayment and underpayment determination. Whenever a determination concerning the amount paid and payable for any period is made and it is found that, with respect to any month in the period, more or less than the correct amount was paid, written notice of the correct and incorrect amounts for each such month in the period will be sent to the individual against whom adjustment or recovery of the overpayment as defined in § 416.537(a) may be effected or to whom the underpayment as defined in §§ 416.536 and any amounts subject to installment payments as defined in § 416.544 would be payable, notwithstanding the fact that part or all of the underpayment must be withheld in accordance with § 416.543. When notifying an individual of a determination of overpayment, the Social Security Administration will, in the notice, also advise the individual that adjustment or recovery is required, as set forth in § 416.571, except under certain specified conditions, and of his or her right to request waiver of adjustment or recovery of the overpayment under the provisions of § 416.550.

(b) Notice of waiver determination. Written notice of an initial determination of waiver shall be given the individual in accordance with § 416.1404 unless the individual was not given notice of the overpayment in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Notice relating to installment payments to individuals whose drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability. Whenever a determination is made concerning the amount of any benefits due for a period that must be paid in installments, the written notice will also explain the amount of the installment payment and when an increased initial installment payment may be made (as described in § 416.544). This written notice will be sent to the individual and his or her representative payee.

[40 FR 47764, Oct. 10, 1975, as amended at 55 FR 33668, Aug. 17, 1990; 60 FR 8150, Feb. 10, 1995]

§ 416.560 Recovery - refund.

An overpayment may be refunded by the overpaid recipient or by anyone on his or her behalf. Refund should be made in every case where the overpaid individual is not currently eligible for SSI benefits. If the individual is currently eligible for SSI benefits and has not refunded the overpayment, adjustment as set forth in § 416.570 will be proposed.

[55 FR 33669, Aug. 17, 1990]

§ 416.570 Adjustment.

(a) General. When a recipient has been overpaid, the overpayment has not been refunded, and waiver of adjustment or recovery is not applicable, any payment due the overpaid recipient or his or her eligible spouse (or recovery from the estate of either or both when either or both die before adjustment is completed) is adjusted for recovery of the overpayment. Adjustment will generally be accomplished by withholding each month the amount set forth in § 416.571 from the benefit payable to the individual except that, when the overpayment results from the disposition of resources as provided by §§ 416.1240(b) and 416.1244, the overpayment will be recovered by withholding any payments due the overpaid recipient or his or her eligible spouse before any further payment is made. Absent a specific request from the person from whom recovery is sought, no overpayment made under title XVIII of the Act will be recovered by adjusting SSI benefits. In no case shall an overpayment of SSI benefits be adjusted against title XVIII benefits. No funds properly deposited into a dedicated account (see §§ 416.546 and 416.640(e)) can be used to repay an overpayment while the overpaid individual remains subject to the provisions of those sections.

(b) Overpayment made to representative payee after the recipient's death. A representative payee or his estate is solely liable for repaying an overpayment made to the representative payee on behalf of a recipient after the recipient's death. In such case, we will recover the overpayment according to paragraph (a) of this section, except that:

(1) We will not adjust any other payment due to the eligible spouse of the overpaid representative payee to recover the overpayment, and

(2) If the overpaid representative payee dies before we complete adjustment, we will not seek to recover the overpayment from the eligible spouse or the estate of the eligible spouse.

[70 FR 16, Jan. 3, 2005, as amended at 73 FR 65543, Nov. 4, 2008]

§ 416.571 10-percent limitation of recoupment rate - overpayment.

Any adjustment or recovery of an overpayment for an individual in current payment status is limited in amount in any month to the lesser of (1) the amount of the individual's benefit payment for that month or (2) an amount equal to 10 percent of the individual's total income (countable income plus SSI and State supplementary payments) for that month. The countable income used is the countable income used in determining the SSI and State supplementary payments for that month under § 416.420. When the overpaid individual is notified of the proposed SSI and/or federally administered State supplementary overpayment adjustment or recovery, the individual will be given the opportunity to request that such adjustment or recovery be made at a higher or lower rate than that proposed. If a lower rate is requested, a rate of withholding that is appropriate to the financial condition of the overpaid individual will be set after an evaluation of all the pertinent facts. An appropriate rate is one that will not deprive the individual of income required for ordinary and necessary living expenses. This will include an evaluation of the individual's income, resources, and other financial obligations. The 10-percent limitation does not apply where it is determined that the overpayment occurred because of fraud, willful misrepresentation, or concealment of material information committed by the individual or his or her spouse. Concealment of material information means an intentional, knowing, and purposeful delay in making or failure to make a report that will affect payment amount and/or eligibility. It does not include a mere omission on the part of the recipient; it is an affirmative act to conceal. The 10-percent limitation does not apply to the recovery of overpayments incurred under agreements to dispose of resources pursuant to § 416.1240. In addition, the 10-percent limitation does not apply to the reduction of any future SSI benefits as a consequence of the misuse of funds set aside in accordance with § 416.1231(b) to meet burial expenses. Adjustment or recovery will be suspended if the recipient is subject to a reduced benefit rate under § 416.414 because of residing in a medical treatment facility in which Medicaid is paying a substantial portion of the recipient's cost of care.

[55 FR 33669, Aug. 17, 1990, as amended at 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007]

§ 416.572 Are title II and title VIII benefits subject to adjustment to recover title XVI overpayments?

(a) Definitions -

(1) Cross-program recovery. Cross-program recovery is the process that we will use to collect title XVI overpayments from benefits payable to you under title II or title VIII of the Social Security Act.

(2) Benefits payable. For purposes of this section, benefits payable means the amount of title II or title VIII benefits you actually would receive. For title II benefits, it includes your monthly benefit and your past-due benefits after any reductions or deductions listed in § 404.401(a) and (b) of this chapter. For title VIII benefits, it includes your monthly benefit and any past-due benefits after any reduction by the amount of income for the month as described in §§ 408.505 through 408.510 of this chapter.

(b) When may we collect title XVI overpayments using cross-program recovery? We may use cross-program recovery to collect a title XVI overpayment you owe when benefits are payable to you under title II, title VIII, or both.

[70 FR 16, Jan. 3, 2005]

§ 416.573 How much will we withhold from your title II and title VIII benefits to recover a title XVI overpayment?

(a) If past-due benefits are payable to you, we will withhold the lesser of the entire overpayment balance or the entire amount of past-due benefits.

(b)

(1) We will collect the overpayment from current monthly benefits due in a month by withholding the lesser of the amount of the entire overpayment balance or 10 percent of the monthly title II benefits and monthly title VIII benefits payable to you in the month.

(2) If we are already recovering a title II, title VIII or title XVI overpayment from your monthly title II benefit, we will figure your monthly withholding from title XVI payments (as described in § 416.571) without including your title II benefits in your total countable income.

(3) Paragraph (b)(1) of this section does not apply if:

(i) You request and we approve a different rate of withholding, or

(ii) You or your spouse willfully misrepresented or concealed material information in connection with the overpayment.

(c) In determining whether to grant your request that we withhold less than the amount described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, we will use the criteria applied under § 416.571 to similar requests about withholding from title XVI benefits.

(d) If you or your spouse willfully misrepresented or concealed material information in connection with the overpayment, we will collect the overpayment by withholding the lesser of the overpayment balance or the entire amount of title II benefits and title VIII benefits payable to you. We will not collect at a lesser rate. (See § 416.571 for what we mean by concealment of material information.)

[70 FR 16, Jan. 3, 2005]

§ 416.574 Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

Before we collect an overpayment from you using cross-program recovery, we will send you a written notice that tells you the following information:

(a) We have determined that you owe a specific overpayment balance that can be collected by cross-program recovery;

(b) We will withhold a specific amount from the title II or title VIII benefits (see § 416.573);

(c) You may ask us to review this determination that you still owe this overpayment balance;

(d) You may request that we withhold a different amount from your current monthly benefits (the notice will not include this information if § 416.573(d) applies); and

(e) You may ask us to waive collection of this overpayment balance.

[70 FR 16, Jan. 3, 2005]

§ 416.575 When will we begin cross-program recovery from your current monthly benefits?

(a) We will begin collecting the overpayment balance by cross-program recovery from your current monthly title II and title VIII benefits no sooner than 30 calendar days after the date of the notice described in § 416.574. If within that 30-day period you pay us the full overpayment balance stated in the notice, we will not begin cross-program recovery.

(b) If within that 30-day period you ask us to review our determination that you still owe us this overpayment balance, we will not begin cross-program recovery from your current monthly benefits before we review the matter and notify you of our decision in writing.

(c) If within that 30-day period you ask us to withhold a different amount from your current monthly benefits than the amount stated in the notice, we will not begin cross-program recovery until we determine the amount we will withhold. This paragraph does not apply when § 416.573(d) applies.

(d) If within that 30-day period you ask us to waive recovery of the overpayment balance, we will not begin cross-program recovery from your current monthly benefits before we review the matter and notify you of our decision in writing. See §§ 416.550 through 416.556.

[70 FR 16, Jan. 3, 2005]

§ 416.580 Referral of overpayments to the Department of the Treasury for tax refund offset - General.

(a) The standards we will apply and the procedures we will follow before requesting the Department of the Treasury to offset income tax refunds due taxpayers who have an outstanding overpayment are set forth in §§ 416.580 through 416.586 of this subpart. These standards and procedures are authorized by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984 [31 U.S.C. § 3720A], as implemented through Department of the Treasury regulations at 31 CFR 285.2.

(b) We will use the Department of the Treasury tax refund offset procedure to collect overpayments that are certain in amount, past due and legally enforceable, and eligible for tax refund offset under regulations issued by the Secretary of the Treasury. We will use these procedures to collect overpayments only from persons who are not currently entitled to monthly supplemental security income benefits under title XVI of the Act. We refer overpayments to the Department of the Treasury for offset against Federal tax refunds regardless of the amount of time the debts have been outstanding.

[62 FR 49439, Sept. 22, 1997, as amended at 76 FR 65108, Oct. 20, 2011]

§ 416.581 Notice to overpaid person.

We will make a request for collection by reduction of Federal and State income tax refunds only after we determine that a person owes an overpayment that is past due and provide the overpaid person with written notice. Our notice of intent to collect an overpayment through tax refund offset will state:

(a) The amount of the overpayment; and

(b) That we will collect the overpayment by requesting that the Department of the Treasury reduce any amounts payable to the overpaid person as refunds of Federal and State income taxes by an amount equal to the amount of the overpayment unless, within 60 calendar days from the date of our notice, the overpaid person:

(1) Repays the overpayment in full; or

(2) Provides evidence to us at the address given in our notice that the overpayment is not past due or legally enforceable; or

(3) Asks us to waive collection of the overpayment under section 204(b) of the Act.

(c) The conditions under which we will waive recovery of an overpayment under section 1631(b)(1)(B) of the Act;

(d) That we will review any evidence presented that the overpayment is not past due or not legally enforceable;

(e) That the overpaid person has the right to inspect and copy our records related to the overpayment as determined by us and will be informed as to where and when the inspection and copying can be done after we receive notice from the overpaid person that inspection and copying are requested.

[62 FR 49439, Sept. 22, 1997, as amended at 76 FR 65109, Oct. 20, 2011]

§ 416.582 Review within SSA that an overpayment is past due and legally enforceable.

(a) Notification by overpaid individual. An overpaid individual who receives a notice as described in § 416.581 of this subpart has the right to present evidence that all or part of the overpayment is not past due or not legally enforceable. To exercise this right, the individual must notify us and present evidence regarding the overpayment within 60 calendar days from the date of our notice.

(b) Submission of evidence. The overpaid individual may submit evidence showing that all or part of the debt is not past due or not legally enforceable as provided in paragraph (a) of this section. Failure to submit the notification and evidence within 60 calendar days will result in referral of the overpayment to the Department of the Treasury, unless the overpaid individual, within this 60-day time period, has asked us to waive collection of the overpayment under section 1631(b)(1)(B) of the Act and we have not yet determined whether we can grant the waiver request. If the overpaid individual asks us to waive collection of the overpayment, we may ask that evidence to support the request be submitted to us.

(c) Review of the evidence. After a timely submission of evidence by the overpaid individual, we will consider all available evidence related to the overpayment. We will make findings based on a review of the written record, unless we determine that the question of indebtedness cannot be resolved by a review of the documentary evidence.

[62 FR 49439, Sept. 22, 1997]

§ 416.583 Findings by SSA.

(a) Following the review of the record, we will issue written findings which include supporting rationale for the findings. Issuance of these findings concerning whether the overpayment or part of the overpayment is past due and legally enforceable is the final Agency action with respect to the past-due status and enforceability of the overpayment. If we make a determination that a waiver request cannot be granted, we will issue a written notice of this determination in accordance with the regulations in subpart E of this part. Our referral of the overpayment to the Department of the Treasury will not be suspended under § 416.585 of this subpart pending any further administrative review of the waiver request that the individual may seek.

(b) Copies of the findings described in paragraph (a) of this section will be distributed to the overpaid individual and the overpaid individual's attorney or other representative, if any.

(c) If the findings referred to in paragraph (a) of this section affirm that all or part of the overpayment is past due and legally enforceable and, if waiver is requested and we determine that the request cannot be granted, we will refer the overpayment to the Department of the Treasury. However, no referral will be made if, based on our review of the overpayment, we reverse our prior finding that the overpayment is past due and legally enforceable or, upon consideration of a waiver request, we determine that waiver of our collection of the overpayment is appropriate.

[62 FR 49439, Sept. 22, 1997]

§ 416.584 Review of our records related to the overpayment.

(a) Notification by the overpaid individual. An overpaid individual who intends to inspect or copy our records related to the overpayment as determined by us must notify us stating his or her intention to inspect or copy.

(b) Our response. In response to a notification by the overpaid individual as described in paragraph (a) of this section, we will notify the overpaid individual of the location and time when the overpaid individual may inspect or copy our records related to the overpayment. We may also, at our discretion, mail copies of the overpayment-related records to the overpaid individual.

[62 FR 49439, Sept. 22, 1997]

§ 416.585 Suspension of offset.

If, within 60 days of the date of the notice described in § 416.581 of this subpart, the overpaid individual notifies us that he or she is exercising a right described in § 416.582(a) of this subpart and submits evidence pursuant to § 416.582(b) of this subpart or requests a waiver under § 416.550 of this subpart, we will suspend any notice to the Department of the Treasury until we have issued written findings that affirm that an overpayment is past due and legally enforceable and, if applicable, make a determination that a waiver request cannot be granted.

[62 FR 49440, Sept. 22, 1997]

§ 416.586 Tax refund insufficient to cover amount of overpayment.

If a tax refund is insufficient to recover an overpayment in a given year, the case will remain with the Department of the Treasury for succeeding years, assuming that all criteria for certification are met at that time.

[62 FR 49440, Sept. 22, 1997]

§ 416.590 Are there additional methods for recovery of title XVI benefit overpayments?

(a) General. In addition to the methods specified in §§ 416.560, 416.570, 416.572 and 416.580, we may recover an overpayment under title XVI of the Act from you under the rules in subparts D and E of part 422 of this chapter. Subpart D of part 422 of this chapter applies only under the following conditions:

(1) The overpayment occurred after you attained age 18;

(2) You are no longer entitled to benefits under title XVI of the Act; and

(3) Pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, we have determined that the overpayment is otherwise unrecoverable under section 1631(b) of the Act.

(b) When we consider an overpayment to be otherwise unrecoverable. We consider an overpayment under title XVI of the Act to be otherwise unrecoverable under section 1631(b) of the Act if all of the following conditions are met:

(1) We have completed our billing system sequence (i.e., we have sent you an initial notice of the overpayment, a reminder notice, and a past-due notice) or we have suspended or terminated collection activity under applicable rules, such as, the Federal Claims Collection Standards in 31 CFR 903.2 or 903.3.

(2) We have not entered into an installment payment arrangement with you or, if we have entered into such an arrangement, you have failed to make any payment for two consecutive months.

(3) You have not requested waiver pursuant to § 416.550 or § 416.582 or, after a review conducted pursuant to those sections, we have determined that we will not waive collection of the overpayment.

(4) You have not requested reconsideration of the initial overpayment determination pursuant to §§ 416.1407 and 416.1409 or, after a review conducted pursuant to § 416.1413, we have affirmed all or part of the initial overpayment determination.

(5) We cannot recover your overpayment pursuant to § 416.570 by adjustment of benefits payable to any individual other than you. For purposes of this paragraph, if you are a member of an eligible couple that is legally separated and/or living apart, we will deem unrecoverable from the other person that part of your overpayment which he or she did not receive.

[66 FR 67081, Dec. 28, 2001, as amended at 68 FR 74184, Dec. 23, 2003]

Subpart F - Representative Payment
Authority:

Secs. 205(j)(1)(C), 702(a)(5), 1631(a)(2) and (d)(1) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 405(j)(1)(C), 902(a)(5), 1383(a)(2) and (d)(1)).

Source:

47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

§ 416.601 Introduction.

(a) Explanation of representative payment. This subpart explains the principles and procedures that we follow in determining whether to make representative payment and in selecting a representative payee. It also explains the responsibilities that a representative payee has concerning the use of the funds he or she receives on behalf of a beneficiary. A representative payee may be either a person or an organization selected by us to receive benefits on behalf of a beneficiary. A representative payee will be selected if we believe that the interest of a beneficiary will be served by representative payment rather than direct payment of benefits. Generally, we appoint a representative payee if we have determined that the beneficiary is not able to manage or direct the management of benefit payments in his or her own interest.

(b) Policy used to determine whether to make representative payment.

(1) Our policy is that every beneficiary has the right to manage his or her own benefits. However, some beneficiaries due to a mental or physical condition or due to their youth may be unable to do so. Under these circumstances, we may determine that the interests of the beneficiary would be better served if we certified benefit payments to another person as a representative payee. However, we must select a representative payee for an individual who is eligible for benefits solely on the basis of disability if drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability.

(2) If we determine that representative payment is in the interest of a beneficiary, we will appoint a representative payee. We may appoint a representative payee even if the beneficiary is a legally competent individual. If the beneficiary is a legally incompetent individual, we may appoint the legal guardian or some other person as a representative payee.

(3) If payment is being made directly to a beneficiary and a question arises concerning his or her ability to manage or direct the management of benefit payments, we will, if the beneficiary is 18 years old or older and has not been adjudged legally incompetent, continue to pay the beneficiary until we make a determination about his or her ability to manage or direct the management of benefit payments and the selection of a representative payee.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 60 FR 8150, Feb. 10, 1995]

§ 416.610 When payment will be made to a representative payee.

(a) We pay benefits to a representative payee on behalf of a beneficiary 18 years old or older when it appears to us that this method of payment will be in the interest of the beneficiary. We do this if we have information that the beneficiary is -

(1) Legally incompetent or mentally incapable of managing benefit payments; or

(2) Physically incapable of managing or directing the management of his or her benefit payments; or

(3) Eligible for benefits solely on the basis of disability and drug addiction or alcoholism is a contributing factor material to the determination of disability.

(b) Generally, if a beneficiary is under age 18, we will pay benefits to a representative payee. However, in certain situations, we will make direct payments to a beneficiary under age 18 who shows the ability to manage the benefits. For example, we make direct payment to a beneficiary under age 18 if the beneficiary is -

(1) A parent and files for himself or herself and/or his or her child and he or she has experience in handling his or her own finances; or

(2) Capable of using the benefits to provide for his or her current needs and no qualified payee is available; or

(3) Within 7 months of attaining age 18 and is initially filing an application for benefits.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 35483, Aug. 28, 1989; 60 FR 8150, Feb. 10, 1995]

§ 416.611 What happens to your monthly benefits while we are finding a suitable representative payee for you?

(a) We may pay you directly. We will pay current monthly benefits directly to you while finding a suitable representative payee unless we determine that paying you directly would cause substantial harm to you. We determine substantial harm as follows:

(1) If you are receiving disability payments and we have determined that you have a drug addiction or alcoholism condition, or you are legally incompetent, or you are under age 15, we will presume that substantial harm exists. However, we will allow you to rebut this presumption by presenting evidence that direct payment would not cause you substantial harm.

(2) If you do not fit any of these categories, we make findings of substantial harm on a case-by-case basis. We consider all matters that may affect your ability to manage your benefits in your own best interest. We decide that substantial harm exists if both of the following conditions exist:

(i) Directly receiving benefits can be expected to cause you serious physical or mental injury.

(ii) The possible effect of the injury would outweigh the effect of having no income to meet your basic needs.

(b) We may delay or suspend your payments. If we find that direct payment will cause substantial harm to you, we may delay (in the case of initial eligibility for benefits) or suspend (in the case of existing eligibility for benefits) payments for as long as one month while we try to find a suitable representative payee. If we do not find a payee within one month, we will pay you directly. If you are receiving disability payments and we have determined that you have a drug addiction or alcoholism condition, or you are legally incompetent, or you are under age 15, we will withhold payment until a representative payee is appointed even if it takes longer than one month. We will, however, as noted in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, allow you to present evidence to rebut the presumption that direct payment would cause you substantial harm. See § 416.601(b)(3) for our policy on suspending the benefits if you are currently receiving benefits directly.

Example 1: Substantial Harm Exists.

We are unable to find a representative payee for Mr. X, a 67 year old claimant receiving title XVI benefits based on age who is an alcoholic. Based on contacts with the doctor and beneficiary, we determine that Mr. X was hospitalized recently for his drinking. Paying him directly will cause serious injury, so we may delay payment for as long as one month based on substantial harm while we locate a suitable representative payee.

Example 2: Substantial Harm Does Not Exist.

We approve a claim for Mr. Y, a title XVI claimant who suffers from a combination of mental impairments but who is not legally incompetent. We determine that Mr. Y needs assistance in managing benefits, but we have not found a representative payee. Although we believe that Mr. Y may not use the money wisely, there is no indication that receiving funds directly would cause him substantial harm (i.e., serious physical or mental injury). We must pay current benefits directly to Mr. Y while we locate a suitable representative payee.

(c) How we pay delayed or suspended benefits. Payment of benefits, which were delayed or suspended pending appointment of a representative payee, can be made to you or your representative payee as a single sum or in installments when we determine that installments are in your best interest.

[69 FR 60236, Oct. 7, 2004]

§ 416.615 Information considered in determining whether to make representative payment.

In determining whether to make representative payment we consider the following information:

(a) Court determinations. If we learn that a beneficiary has been found to be legally incompetent, a certified copy of the court's determination will be the basis of our determination to make representative payment.

(b) Medical evidence. When available, we will use medical evidence to determine if a beneficiary is capable of managing or directing the management of benefit payments. For example, a statement by a physician or other medical professional based upon his or her recent examination of the beneficiary and his or her knowledge of the beneficiary's present condition will be used in our determination, if it includes information concerning the nature of the beneficiary's illness, the beneficiary's chances for recovery and the opinion of the physician or other medical professional as to whether the beneficiary is able to manage or direct the management of benefit payments.

(c) Other evidence. We will also consider any statements of relatives, friends and other people in a position to know and observe the beneficiary, which contain information helpful to us in deciding whether the beneficiary is able to manage or direct the management of benefit payments.

§ 416.618 Advance designation of representative payees.

(a) General. An individual who:

(1) Is eligible for or an applicant for a benefit; and

(2) Has attained 18 years of age or is an emancipated minor, may designate in advance one or more individuals to possibly serve as a representative payee for the individual if we determine that payment will be made to a representative payee (see § 416.610(a)). An individual may not designate in advance possible representative payees if we have information that the individual is either legally incompetent or mentally incapable of managing his or her benefit payments; or physically incapable of managing or directing the management of his or her benefit payments.

(b) How to designate possible representative payees in advance. Individuals who meet the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section may designate in advance their choice(s) for possible representative payees by indicating their decision to designate a representative payee in advance and providing us with the required information. In addition to the required information, an individual may choose to provide us with the relationship of the advance designee to the individual. The information we require before we will consider an advance designee as a possible representative payee is:

(1) The name of the advance designee,

(2) A telephone number of the advance designee, and

(3) The order of priority in which the individual would like us to consider the advance designees if he or she designates more than one advance designee.

(c) How to make changes to advance designation. Individuals who meet the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section may change their advance designees by informing us of the change and providing the required information (see paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section) to us. Individuals who meet the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section may withdraw their advance designation by informing us of the withdrawal.

(d) How we consider advance designation when we select a representative payee.

(1) If we determine that payment will be made to a representative payee, we will review advance designees in the order listed by the individual and select the first advance designee who meets the criteria for selection. To meet the criteria for selection -

(i) The advance designee must be willing and able to serve as a representative payee,

(ii) Appointment of the advance designee must comply with the requirements in section 205(j)(2) of the Social Security Act, and

(iii) There must be no other good cause (see §§ 416.620 and 416.621) to prevent us from selecting the advance designee.

(2) If none of the advance designees meet the criteria for selection, we will use our list of categories of preferred payees (see § 416.621), along with our other regulations in subpart F of this part, as a guide to select a suitable representative payee.

(e) How we consider advance designation when we select a subsequent representative payee. If an individual who currently has a representative payee requires a change of representative payee, we will consider any other designees identified by the individual at a time in which that individual was eligible to make an advanced designation, under paragraph (d) of this section.

(f) Organizations. An individual may not designate in advance an organization to serve as his or her possible representative payee.

[85 FR 7665, Feb. 11, 2020]

§ 416.620 Information considered in selecting a representative payee.

In selecting a payee we try to select the person, agency, organization or institution that will best serve the interest of the beneficiary. In making our selection we consider -

(a) The relationship of the person to the beneficiary;

(b) The amount of interest that the person shows in the beneficiary;

(c) Any legal authority the person, agency, organization or institution has to act on behalf of the beneficiary;

(d) Whether the potential payee has custody of the beneficiary;

(e) Whether the potential payee is in a position to know of and look after the needs of the beneficiary;

(f) The potential payee's criminal history; and

(g) Whether the beneficiary made an advance designation (see § 416.618).

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 84 FR 4325, Feb. 15, 2019; 85 FR 7665, Feb. 11. 2020]

§ 416.621 What is our order of preference in selecting a representative payee for you?

As a guide in selecting a representative payee, we have established categories of preferred payees. These preferences are flexible. We will consider an individual's advance designees (see § 416.618) before we consider other potential representative payees in the categories of preferred payees listed in this section. When we select a representative payee, we will choose the designee of the beneficiary's highest priority, provided that the designee is willing and able to serve, is not prohibited from serving (see § 416.622), and supports the best interest of the beneficiary (see § 416.620). The preferences are:

(a) For beneficiaries 18 years old or older (except those described in paragraph (b) of this section), our preference is -

(1) A legal guardian, spouse (or other relative) who has custody of the beneficiary or who demonstrates strong concern for the personal welfare of the beneficiary;

(2) A friend who has custody of the beneficiary or demonstrates strong concern for the personal welfare of the beneficiary;

(3) A public or nonprofit agency or institution having custody of the beneficiary;

(4) A private institution operated for profit and licensed under State law, which has custody of the beneficiary; and

(5) Persons other than above who are qualified to carry out the responsibilities of a payee and who are able and willing to serve as a payee for the beneficiary; e.g., members of community groups or organizations who volunteer to serve as payee for a beneficiary.

(b) For individuals who are disabled and who have a drug addiction or alcoholism condition our preference is -

(1) A community-based nonprofit social service agency licensed by the State, or bonded;

(2) A Federal, State or local government agency whose mission is to carry out income maintenance, social service, or health care-related activities;

(3) A State or local government agency with fiduciary responsibilities;

(4) A designee of an agency (other than a Federal agency) referred to in paragraphs (b)(1), (2), and (3) of this section, if appropriate; or

(5) A family member.

(c) For beneficiaries under age 18, our preference is -

(1) A natural or adoptive parent who has custody of the beneficiary, or a guardian;

(2) A natural or adoptive parent who does not have custody of the beneficiary, but is contributing toward the beneficiary's support and is demonstrating strong concern for the beneficiary's well being;

(3) A natural or adoptive parent who does not have custody of the beneficiary and is not contributing toward his or her support but is demonstrating strong concern for the beneficiary's well being;

(4) A relative or stepparent who has custody of the beneficiary;

(5) A relative who does not have custody of the beneficiary but is contributing toward the beneficiary's support and is demonstrating concern for the beneficiary's well being;

(6) A relative or close friend who does not have custody of the beneficiary but is demonstrating concern for the beneficiary's well being; and

(7) An authorized social agency or custodial institution.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 69 FR 60237, Oct. 7, 2004; 85 FR 7665, Feb. 11, 2020]

§ 416.622 Who may not serve as a representative payee?

A representative payee applicant may not serve if he/she:

(a) Has been convicted of a violation under section 208, 811 or 1632 of the Social Security Act.

(b) Has been convicted of an offense resulting in imprisonment for more than 1 year. However, we may make an exception to this prohibition, if the nature of the conviction is such that selection of the applicant poses no risk to the beneficiary and the exception is in the beneficiary's best interest.

(c) Receives title II, VIII, or XVI benefits through a representative payee.

(d) Previously served as a representative payee and was found by us, or a court of competent jurisdiction, to have misused title II, VIII or XVI benefits. However, if we decide to make an exception to the prohibition, we must evaluate the payee's performance at least every 3 months until we are satisfied that the payee poses no risk to the beneficiary's best interest. Exceptions are made on a case-by-case basis if all of the following are true:

(1) Direct payment of benefits to the beneficiary is not in the beneficiary's best interest.

(2) No suitable alternative payee is available.

(3) Selecting the payee applicant as representative payee would be in the best interest of the beneficiary.

(4) The information we have indicates the applicant is now suitable to serve as a representative payee.

(5) The payee applicant has repaid the misused benefits or has a plan to repay them.

(e) Is a creditor. A creditor is someone who provides you with goods or services for consideration. This restriction does not apply to the creditor who poses no risk to you and whose financial relationship with you presents no substantial conflict of interest, and is any of the following:

(1) A relative living in the same household as you do.

(2) Your legal guardian or legal representative.

(3) A facility that is licensed or certified as a care facility under the law of a State or a political subdivision of a State.

(4) A qualified organization authorized to collect a monthly fee from you for expenses incurred in providing representative payee services for you, under § 416.640a.

(5) An administrator, owner, or employee of the facility in which you live and we are unable to locate an alternative representative payee.

(6) Any other individual we deem appropriate based on a written determination.

Example 1:

Sharon applies to be representative payee for Ron who we have determined needs assistance in managing his benefits. Sharon has been renting a room to Ron for several years and assists Ron in handling his other financial obligations, as needed. She charges Ron a reasonable amount of rent. Ron has no other family or friends willing to help manage his benefits or to act as representative payee. Sharon has demonstrated that her interest in and concern for Ron goes beyond her desire to collect the rent each month. In this instance, we may select Sharon as Ron's representative payee because a more suitable payee is not available, she appears to pose no risk to Ron and there is minimal conflict of interest. We will document this decision.

Example 2:

In a situation similar to the one above, Ron's landlord indicates that she is applying to be payee only to ensure receipt of her rent. If there is money left after payment of the rent, she will give it directly to Ron to manage on his own. In this situation, we would not select the landlord as Ron's representative payee because of the substantial conflict of interest and lack of interest in his well being.

(f) Was convicted under Federal or State law of a felony for: Human trafficking, false imprisonment, kidnapping, rape or sexual assault, first-degree homicide, robbery, fraud to obtain access to government assistance, fraud by scheme, theft of government funds or property, abuse or neglect, forgery, or identity theft or identity fraud. We will also apply this provision to a representative payee applicant with a felony conviction of an attempt to commit any of these crimes or conspiracy to commit any of these crimes.

(1) If the representative payee applicant is the custodial parent of a minor child beneficiary, custodial parent of a beneficiary who is under a disability which began before the beneficiary attained the age of 22, custodial spouse of a beneficiary, custodial court-appointed guardian of a beneficiary, or custodial grandparent of the minor child beneficiary for whom the applicant is applying to serve as representative payee, we will not consider the conviction for one of the crimes, or of attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the crimes, listed in this paragraph (f), by itself, to prohibit the applicant from serving as a representative payee. We will consider the criminal history of an applicant in this category, along with the factors in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, when we decide whether it is in the best interest of the individual entitled to benefits to appoint the applicant as a representative payee.

(2) If the representative payee applicant is the parent who was previously the representative payee for his or her minor child who has since turned age 18 and continues to be eligible for benefits, we will not consider the conviction for one of the crimes, or of attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the crimes, listed in this paragraph (f), by itself, to prohibit the applicant from serving as a representative payee for that beneficiary. We will consider the criminal history of an applicant in this category, along with the factors in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, when we decide whether it is in the best interest of the individual entitled to benefits to appoint the applicant as a representative payee.

(3) If the representative payee applicant received a Presidential or gubernatorial pardon for the relevant conviction, we will not consider the conviction for one of the crimes, or of attempt or conspiracy to commit one of the crimes, listed in this paragraph (f), by itself, to prohibit the applicant from serving as a representative payee. We will consider the criminal history of an applicant in this category, along with the factors in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, when we decide whether it is in the best interest of the individual entitled to benefits to appoint the applicant as a representative payee.

[69 FR 60237, Oct. 7, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 61408, Oct. 18, 2006; 84 FR 4325, Feb. 15, 2019]

§ 416.624 How do we investigate a representative payee applicant?

Before selecting an individual or organization to act as your representative payee, we will perform an investigation.

(a) Nature of the investigation. As part of the investigation, we do the following:

(1) Conduct a face-to-face interview with the payee applicant unless it is impracticable as explained in paragraph (c) of this section.

(2) Require the payee applicant to submit documented proof of identity, unless information establishing identity has recently been submitted with an application for title II, VIII or XVI benefits.

(3) Verify the payee applicant's Social Security account number or employer identification number.

(4) Determine whether the payee applicant has been convicted of a violation of section 208, 811 or 1632 of the Social Security Act.

(5) Determine whether the payee applicant has previously served as a representative payee and if any previous appointment as payee was revoked or terminated for misusing title II, VIII or XVI benefits.

(6) Use our records to verify the payee applicant's employment and/or direct receipt of title II, VIII, or XVI benefits.

(7) Verify the payee applicant's concern for the beneficiary with the beneficiary's custodian or other interested person.

(8) Require the payee applicant to provide adequate information showing his or her relationship to the beneficiary and to describe his or her responsibility for the care of the beneficiary.

(9) Determine whether the payee applicant is a creditor of the beneficiary (see § 416.622(e)).

(10) Conduct a criminal background check on the individual payee applicant.

(b) Subsequent face-to-face interviews. After holding a face-to-face interview with a payee applicant, subsequent face-to-face interviews are not required if that applicant continues to be qualified and currently is acting as a payee, unless we determine, within our discretion, that a new face-to-face interview is necessary. We base this decision on the payee's past performance and knowledge of and compliance with our reporting requirements.

(c) Impracticable. We may consider a face-to-face interview impracticable if it would cause the payee applicant undue hardship. For example, the payee applicant would have to travel a great distance to the field office. In this situation, we may conduct the investigation to determine the payee applicant's suitability to serve as a representative payee without a face-to-face interview.

[69 FR 60237, Oct. 7, 2004, as amended at 73 FR 66521, Nov. 10, 2008; 84 FR 4326, Feb. 15, 2018; 84 FR 57320, Oct. 25, 2019]

§ 416.625 What information must a representative payee report to us?

Anytime after we select a representative payee for you, we may ask your payee to give us information showing a continuing relationship with you, a continuing responsibility for your care, and how he/she used the payments on your behalf. If your representative payee does not give us the requested information within a reasonable period of time, we may stop sending your benefit payment to him/her - unless we determine that he/she had a satisfactory reason for not meeting our request and we subsequently receive the requested information. If we decide to stop sending your benefit payment to your representative payee, we will consider paying you directly (in accordance with § 416.611) while we look for a new payee.

[69 FR 60238, Oct. 7, 2004]

§ 416.626 How do we investigate an appointed representative payee?

After we select an individual to act as your representative payee, we will conduct a criminal background check on the appointed representative payee at least once every 5 years.

[84 FR 4326, Feb. 15, 2019, as amended at 84 FR 57320, Oct. 25, 2019]

§ 416.630 How will we notify you when we decide you need a representative payee?

(a) We notify you in writing of our determination to make representative payment. This advance notice explains that we have determined that representative payment is in your interest, and it provides the name of the representative payee we have selected. We provide this notice before we actually appoint the payee. If you are under age 15, an unemancipated minor under the age of 18, or legally incompetent, our written notice goes to your legal guardian or legal representative. The advance notice:

(1) Contains language that is easily understandable to the reader.

(2) Identifies the person designated as your representative payee.

(3) Explains that you, your legal guardian, or your legal representative can appeal our determination that you need a representative payee.

(4) Explains that you, your legal guardian, or your legal representative can appeal our designation of a particular person to serve as your representative payee.

(5) Explains that you, your legal guardian, or your legal representative can review the evidence upon which our designation of a particular representative payee is based and submit additional evidence.

(b) If you, your legal guardian, or your legal representative objects to representative payment or to the designated payee, we will handle the objection as follows:

(1) If you disagree with the decision and wish to file an appeal, we will process it under subpart N of this part.

(2) If you received your advance notice by mail and you protest or file your appeal within 10 days after you receive the notice, we will delay the action until we make a decision on your protest or appeal. (If you received and signed your notice while you were in the local field office, our decision will be effective immediately.)

[69 FR 60238, Oct. 7, 2004]

§ 416.635 What are the responsibilities of your representative payee?

A representative payee has a responsibility to -

(a) Use the benefits received on your behalf only for your use and benefit in a manner and for the purposes he or she determines under the guidelines in this subpart, to be in your best interests;

(b) Keep any benefits received on your behalf separate from his or her own funds and show your ownership of these benefits unless he or she is your spouse or natural or adoptive parent or stepparent and lives in the same household with you or is a State or local government agency for whom we have granted an exception to this requirement;

(c) Treat any interest earned on the benefits as your property;

(d) Notify us of any event or change in your circumstances that will affect the amount of benefits you receive, your right to receive benefits, or how you receive them;

(e) Submit to us, upon our request, a written report accounting for the benefits received on your behalf, and make all supporting records available for review if requested by us;

(f) Notify us of any change in his or her circumstances that would affect performance of his/her payee responsibilities; and

(g) Ensure that you are receiving treatment to the extent considered medically necessary and available for the condition that was the basis for providing benefits (see § 416.994a(i)) if you are under age 18 (including cases in which your low birth weight is a contributing factor material to our determination that you are disabled).

[71 FR 61408, Oct. 18, 2006]

§ 416.640 Use of benefit payments.

(a) Current maintenance. We will consider that payments we certify to a representive payee have been used for the use and benefit of the beneficiary if they are used for the beneficiary's current maintenance. Current maintenance includes costs incurred in obtaining food, shelter, clothing, medical care and personal comfort items.

Example:

A Supplemental Security Income beneficiary is entitled to a monthly benefit of $264. The beneficiary's son, who is the representative payee, disburses the benefits in the following manner:

Rent and Utilities $166
Medical 20
Food 60
Clothing 10
Miscellaneous 8

The above expenditures would represent proper disbursements on behalf of the beneficiary.

(b) Institution not receiving Medicaid funds on beneficiary's behalf. If a beneficiary is receiving care in a Federal, State, or private institution because of mental or physical incapacity, current maintenance will include the customary charges for the care and services provided by an institution, expenditures for those items which will aid in the beneficiary's recovery or release from the institution, and nominal expenses for personal needs (e.g., personal hygiene items, snacks, candy) which will improve the beneficiary's condition. Except as provided under § 416.212, there is no restriction in using SSI benefits for a beneficiary's current maintenance in an institution. Any payments remaining from SSI benefits may be used for a temporary period to maintain the beneficiary's residence outside of the institution unless a physician has certified that the beneficiary is not likely to return home.

Example:

A hospitalized disabled beneficiary is entitled to a monthly benefit of $264. The beneficiary, who resides in a boarding home, has resided there for over 6 years. It is doubtful that the beneficiary will leave the boarding home in the near future. The boarding home charges $215 per month for the beneficiary's room and board.

The beneficiary's representative payee pays the boarding home $215 (assuming an unsuccessful effort was made to negotiate a lower rate during the beneficiary's absence) and uses the balance to purchase miscellaneous personal items for the beneficiary. There are no benefits remaining which can be conserved on behalf of the beneficiary. The payee's use of the benefits is consistent with our guidelines.

(c) Institution receiving Medicaid funds on beneficiary's behalf. Except in the case of a beneficiary receiving benefits payable under § 416.212, if a beneficiary resides throughout a month in an institution that receives more than 50 percent of the cost of care on behalf of the beneficiary from Medicaid, any payments due shall be used only for the personal needs of the beneficiary and not for other items of current maintenance.

Example:

A disabled beneficiary resides in a hospital. The superintendent of the hospital receives $30 per month as the beneficiary's payee. The benefit payment is disbursed in the following manner, which would be consistent with our guidelines:

Miscellaneous canteen items $10
Clothing 15
Conserved for future needs of the beneficiary 5

(d) Claims of creditors. A payee may not be required to use benefit payments to satisfy a debt of the beneficiary, if the debt arose prior to the first month for which payments are certified to a payee. If the debt arose prior to this time, a payee may satisfy it only if the current and reasonably foreseeable needs of the beneficiary are met.

Example:

A disabled beneficiary was determined to be eligible for a monthly benefit payment of $208 effective April 1981. The benefits were certified to the beneficiary's brother who was appointed as the representative payee. The payee conserved $27 of the benefits received. In June 1981 the payee received a bill from a doctor who had treated the beneficiary in February and March 1981. The bill was for $175.

After reviewing the beneficiary's current needs and resources, the payee decided not to use any of the benefits to pay the doctor's bill. (Approximately $180 a month is required for the beneficiary's current monthly living expenses - rent, utilities, food, and insurance - and the beneficiary will need new shoes and a coat within the next few months.)

Based upon the above, the payee's decision not to pay the doctor's bill is consistent with our guidelines.

(e) Dedicated accounts for eligible individuals under age 18.

(1) When past-due benefit payments are required to be paid into a separate dedicated account (see § 416.546), the representative payee is required to establish in a financial institution an account dedicated to the purposes described in paragraph (e)(2) of this section. This dedicated account may be a checking, savings or money market account subject to the titling requirements set forth in § 416.645. Dedicated accounts may not be in the form of certificates of deposit, mutual funds, stocks, bonds or trusts.

(2) A representative payee shall use dedicated account funds, whether deposited on a mandatory or permissive basis (as described in § 416.546), for the benefit of the child and only for the following allowable expenses -

(i) Medical treatment and education or job skills training;

(ii) If related to the child's impairment(s), personal needs assistance; special equipment; housing modification; and therapy or rehabilitation; or

(iii) Other items and services related to the child's impairment(s) that we determine to be appropriate. The representative payee must explain why or how the other item or service relates to the impairment(s) of the child. Attorney fees related to the pursuit of the child's disability claim and use of funds to prevent malnourishment or homelessness could be considered appropriate expenditures.

(3) Representative payees must keep records and receipts of all deposits to and expenditures from dedicated accounts, and must submit these records to us upon our request, as explained in §§ 416.635 and 416.665.

(4) The use of funds from a dedicated account in any manner not authorized by this section constitutes a misapplication of benefits. These misapplied benefits are not an overpayment as defined in § 416.537; however, if we determine that a representative payee knowingly misapplied funds in a dedicated account, that representative payee shall be liable to us in an amount equal to the total amount of the misapplied funds. In addition, if a recipient who is his or her own payee knowingly misapplies benefits in a dedicated account, we will reduce future benefits payable to that recipient (or to that recipient and his or her spouse) by an amount equal to the total amount of the misapplied funds.

(5) The restrictions described in this section and the income and resource exclusions described in §§ 416.1124(c)(20) and 416.1247 shall continue to apply until all funds in the dedicated account are depleted or eligibility for benefits terminates, whichever comes first. This continuation of the restrictions and exclusions applies in situations where funds remain in the account in any of the following situations -

(i) A child attains age 18, continues to be eligible and receives payments directly;

(ii) A new representative payee is appointed. When funds remaining in a dedicated account are returned to us by the former representative payee, the new representative payee must establish an account in a financial institution into which we will deposit these funds, even if the amount is less than that prescribed in § 416.546; or

(iii) During a period of suspension due to ineligibility as described in § 416.1320, administrative suspension, or a period of eligibility for which no payment is due.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 61 FR 10278, Mar. 13, 1996; 61 FR 67206, Dec. 20, 1996; 76 FR 453, Jan. 5, 2011]

§ 416.640a Compensation for qualified organizations serving as representative payees.

(a) Organizations that can request compensation. A qualified organization can request us to authorize it to collect a monthly fee from your benefit payment. A qualified organization is:

(1) Any State or local government agency with fiduciary responsibilities or whose mission is to carry out income maintenance, social service, or health care-related activities; or

(2) Any community-based nonprofit social service organization founded for religious, charitable or social welfare purposes, which is tax exempt under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code and which is bonded/insured to cover misuse and embezzlement by officers and employees and which is licensed in each State in which it serves as representative payee (if licensing is available in the State). The minimum amount of bonding or insurance coverage must equal the average monthly amount of supplemental security income payments received by the organization plus the amount of the beneficiaries' conserved funds (i.e., beneficiaries' saved supplemental security income payments) plus interest on hand. For example, an organization that has conserved funds of $5,000 and receives an average of $12,000 a month in supplemental security income payments must be bonded/insured for a minimum of $17,000. The license must be appropriate under the laws of the State for the type of services the organization provides. An example of an appropriately licensed organization is a community mental health center holding a State license to provide community mental health services.

(b) Requirements qualified organizations must meet. Organizations that are qualified under paragraphs (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section must also meet the following requirements before we can authorize them to collect a monthly fee.

(1) A qualified organization must regularly provide representative payee services concurrently to at least five beneficiaries. An organization which has received our authorization to collect a fee for representative payee services, but is temporarily (not more than 6 months) not a payee for at least five beneficiaries, may request our approval to continue to collect fees.

(2) A qualified organization must demonstrate that it is not a creditor of the beneficiary. See paragraph (c) of this section for exceptions to the requirement regarding creditors.

(c) Creditor relationship. On a case-by-case basis, we may authorize an organization to collect a fee for payee services despite the creditor relationship. (For example, the creditor is the beneficiary's landlord.) To provide this authorization, we will review all of the evidence submitted by the organization and authorize collection of a fee when:

(1) The creditor services (e.g., providing housing) provided by the organization help to meet the current needs of the beneficiary; and

(2) The amount the organization charges the beneficiary for these services is commensurate with the beneficiary's ability to pay.

(d) Authorization process.

(1) An organization must request in writing and receive an authorization from us before it may collect a fee.

(2) An organization seeking authorization to collect a fee must also give us evidence to show that it is qualified, pursuant to paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, to collect a fee.

(3) If the evidence provided to us by the organization shows that it meets the requirements of this section, and additional investigation by us proves it suitable to serve, we will notify the organization in writing that it is authorized to collect a fee. If we need more evidence, or if we are not able to authorize the collection of a fee, we will also notify the organization in writing that we have not authorized the collection of a fee.

(e) Revocation and cancellation of the authorization.

(1) We will revoke an authorization to collect a fee if we have evidence which establishes that an organization no longer meets the requirements of this section. We will issue a written notice to the organization explaining the reason(s) for the revocation.

(2) An organization may cancel its authorization at any time upon written notice to us.

(f) Notices. The written notice we will send to an organization authorizing the collection of a fee will contain an effective date for the collection of a fee pursuant to paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) of this section. The effective date will be no earlier than the month in which the organization asked for authorization to collect a fee. The notice will be applicable to all beneficiaries for whom the organization was payee at the time of our authorization and all beneficiaries for whom the organization becomes payee while the authorization is in effect.

(g) Limitation on fees.

(1) An organization authorized to collect a fee under this section may collect from a beneficiary a monthly fee for expenses (including overhead) it has incurred in providing payee services to a beneficiary. The limit on the fee a qualified organization may collect for providing payee services increases by the same percentage as the annual cost of living adjustment (COLA). The increased fee amount (rounded to the nearest dollar) is taken beginning with the payment for January.

(2) Any agreement providing for a fee in excess of the amount permitted shall be void and treated as misuse of your benefits by the organization under § 416.641.

(3) A fee may be collected for any month during which the organization -

(i) Provides representative payee services;

(ii) Receives a benefit payment for the beneficiary; and

(iii) Is authorized to receive a fee for representative payee services.

(4) Fees for services may not be taken from any funds conserved for the beneficiary by a payee in accordance with § 416.645.

(5) Generally, an organization may not collect a fee for months in which it does not receive a benefit payment. However, an organization will be allowed to collect a fee for months in which it did not receive a payment if we later issue payment for these months and the organization:

(i) Received our approval to collect a fee for the months for which payment is made;

(ii) Provided payee services in the months for which payment is made; and

(iii) Was the payee when the retroactive payment was paid by us.

(6) Fees for services may not be taken from beneficiary benefits for the months for which we or a court of competent jurisdiction determine(s) that the representative payee misused benefits. Any fees collected for such months will be treated as a part of the beneficiary's misused benefits.

(7) An authorized organization can collect a fee for providing representative payee services from another source if the total amount of the fee collected from both the beneficiary and the other source does not exceed the amount authorized by us.

[69 FR 60238, Oct. 7, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 61408, Oct. 18, 2006]

§ 416.641 Who is liable if your representative payee misuses your benefits?

(a) A representative payee who misuses your benefits is responsible for paying back misused benefits. We will make every reasonable effort to obtain restitution of misused benefits so that we can repay these benefits to you.

(b) Whether or not we have obtained restitution from the misuser, we will repay benefits in cases when we determine that a representative payee misused benefits and the representative payee is an organization or an individual payee serving 15 or more beneficiaries. When we make restitution, we will pay you or your alternative representative payee an amount equal to the misused benefits less any amount we collected from the misuser and repaid to you.

(c) Whether or not we have obtained restitution form the misuser, we will repay benefits in cases when we determine that an individual representative payee serving 14 or fewer beneficiaries misused benefits and our negligent failure in the investigation or monitoring of that representative payee results in the misuse. When we make restitution, we will pay you or your alternative representative payee an amount equal to the misused benefits less any amount we collected from the misuser and repaid to you.

(d) The term “negligent failure” used in this subpart means that we failed to investigate or monitor a representative payee or that we did investigate or monitor a representative payee but did not follow established procedures in our investigation or monitoring. Examples of our negligent failure include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) We did not follow our established procedures in this subpart when investigating, appointing, or monitoring a representative payee;

(2) We did not investigate timely a reported allegation of misuse; or

(3) We did not take the steps necessary to prevent the issuance of payments to the representative payee after it was determined that the payee misused benefits.

(e) Our repayment of misused benefits under these provisions does not alter the representative payee's liability and responsibility as described in paragraph (a) of this section.

(f) Any amounts that the representative payee misuses and does not refund will be treated as an overpayment to that representative payee. See subpart E of this part.

[69 FR 60239, Oct. 7, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 61409, Oct. 18, 2006]

§ 416.645 Conservation and investment of benefit payments.

(a) General. If payments are not needed for the beneficiary's current maintenance or reasonably foreseeable needs, they shall be conserved or invested on behalf of the beneficiary. Conserved funds should be invested in accordance with the rules followed by trustees. Any investment must show clearly that the payee holds the property in trust for the beneficiary.

Example:

A State institution for children with intellectual disability, which is receiving Medicaid funds, is representative payee for several beneficiaries. The checks the payee receives are deposited into one account which shows that the benefits are held in trust for the beneficiaries. The institution has supporting records which show the share each individual has in the account. Funds from this account are disbursed fairly quickly after receipt for the personal needs of the beneficiaries. However, not all those funds were disbursed for this purpose. As a result, several of the beneficiaries have significant accumulated resources in this account. For those beneficiaries whose benefits have accumulated over $150, the funds should be deposited in an interest-bearing account or invested relatively free of risk on behalf of the beneficiaries.

(b) Preferred investments. Preferred investments for excess funds are U.S. Savings Bonds and deposits in an interest or dividend paying account in a bank, trust company, credit union, or savings and loan association which is insured under either Federal or State law. The account must be in a form which shows clearly that the representative payee has only a fiduciary and not a personal interest in the funds. If the payee is the legally appointed guardian or fiduciary of the beneficiary, the account may be established to indicate this relationship. If the payee is not the legally appointed guardian or fiduciary, the accounts may be established as follows:

(1) For U.S. Savings Bonds -

______ (Name of beneficiary) ___ (Social Security Number), for whom ______ (Name of payee) is representative payee for Supplemental Security Income benefits;

(2) For interest or dividend paying accounts -

______ (Name of beneficiary) by ______ (Name of payee), representative payee.

(c) Interest and dividend payments. The interest and dividends which result from an investment are the property of the beneficiary and may not be considered to be the property of the payee.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 78 FR 46501, Aug. 1, 2013]

§ 416.650 When will we select a new representative payee for you?

When we learn that your interest is not served by sending your benefit payment to your present representative payee or that your present payee is no longer able or willing to carry out payee responsibilities, we will promptly stop sending your payment to the payee. We will then send your benefit payment to an alternative payee or directly to you, until we find a suitable payee. We may suspend payment as explained in § 416.611(c) if we find that paying you directly would cause substantial harm and we cannot find a suitable alternative representative payee before your next payment is due. We will terminate payment of benefits to your representative payee and find a new payee or pay you directly if the present payee:

(a) Has been found by us or a court of competent jurisdiction to have misused your benefits;

(b) Has not used the benefit payments on your behalf in accordance with the guidelines in this subpart;

(c) Has not carried out the other responsibilities described in this subpart;

(d) Dies;

(e) No longer wishes to be your payee;

(f) Is unable to manage your benefit payments; or

(g) Fails to cooperate, within a reasonable time, in providing evidence, accounting, or other information we request.

[69 FR 60239, Oct. 7, 2004]

§ 416.655 When representative payment will be stopped.

If a beneficiary receiving representative payment shows us that he or she is mentally and physically able to manage or direct the management of benefit payments, we will make direct payment. Information which the beneficiary may give us to support his or her request for direct payment include the following -

(a) A physician's statement regarding the beneficiary's condition, or a statement by a medical officer of the institution where the beneficiary is or was confined, showing that the beneficiary is able to manage or direct the management of his or her funds; or

(b) A certified copy of a court order restoring the beneficiary's rights in a case where a beneficiary was adjudged legally incompetent; or

(c) Other evidence which establishes the beneficiary's ability to manage or direct the management of benefits.

§ 416.660 Transfer of accumulated benefit payments.

A representative payee who has conserved or invested benefit payments shall transfer these funds and the interest earned from the invested funds to either a successor payee, to the beneficiary, or to us, as we will specify. If the funds and the earned interest are returned to us, we will recertify them to a successor representative payee or to the beneficiary.

[47 FR 30475, July 14, 1982, as amended at 75 FR 7552, Feb. 22, 2010]

§ 416.665 How does your representative payee account for the use of benefits?

Your representative payee must account for the use of your benefits. We require written reports from your representative payee at least once a year (except for certain State institutions that participate in a separate onsite review program). We may verify how your representative payee used your benefits. Your representative payee should keep records of how benefits were used in order to make accounting reports and must make those records available upon our request. If your representative payee fails to provide an annual accounting of benefits or other required reports, we may require your payee to receive your benefits in person at the local Social Security field office or a United States Government facility that we designate serving the area in which you reside. The decision to have your representative payee receive your benefits in person may be based on a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons may include the payee's history of past performance or our past difficulty in contacting the payee. We may ask your representative payee to give us the following information:

(a) Where you lived during the accounting period;

(b) Who made the decisions on how your benefits were spent or saved;

(c) How your benefit payments were used; and

(d) How much of your benefit payments were saved and how the savings were invested.

[69 FR 60239, Oct. 7, 2004, as amended at 71 FR 61409, Oct. 18, 2006]

Subpart G - Reports Required
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1611, 1612, 1613, 1614, and 1631 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1382, 1382a, 1382b, 1382c, and 1383); sec. 211, Pub. L. 93-66, 87 Stat. 154 (42 U.S.C. 1382 note); sec. 202, Pub. L. 108-203, 118 Stat. 509 (42 U.S.C. 902 note).

Source:

46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, unless otherwise noted.

Introduction
§ 416.701 Scope of subpart.

(a) Report provisions. The Social Security Administration, to achieve efficient administration of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled, requires that you (or your representative) must report certain events to us. It is important for us to know about these events because they may affect your continued eligibility for SSI benefits or the amount of your benefits. This subpart tells you what events you must report; what your reports must include; and when reports are due. The rules regarding reports are in §§ 416.704 through 416.714.

(b) Penalty deductions. If you fail to make a required report when it is due, you may suffer a penalty. This subpart describes the penalties; discusses when we may impose them; and explains that we will not impose a penalty if you have good cause for failing to report timely. The rules regarding penalties are in §§ 416.722 through 416.732.

§ 416.702 Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart -

Essential person means someone whose presence was believed to be necessary for your welfare under the State program that preceded the SSI program. (See §§ 416.220 through 416.223 of this part.)

Parent means a natural parent, an adoptive parent, or the spouse of a natural or adoptive parent.

Representative payee means an individual, an agency, or an institution selected by us to receive and manage SSI benefits on your behalf. (See subpart F of this part for details describing when a representative payee is selected and a representative payee's responsibilities.)

Residence in the United States means that your permanent home is in the United States.

United States or U.S. means the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

We, Us, or Our means the Social Security Administration.

You or Your means an applicant, an eligible individual, an eligible spouse, or an eligible child.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 65 FR 16814, Mar. 30, 2000]

Report Provisions
§ 416.704 Who must make reports.

(a) You are responsible for making required reports to us if you are -

(1) An eligible individual (see § 416.120(c)(13));

(2) An eligible spouse (see § 416.120(c)(14));

(3) An eligible child (see §§ 416.120(c)(13) and 416.1856); or

(4) An applicant awaiting a final determination upon an application.

(b) If you have a representative payee, and you have not been legally adjudged incompetent, either you or your representative payee must make the required reports.

(c) If you have a representative payee and you have been legally adjudged incompetent, you are not responsible for making reports to us; however, your representative payee is responsible for making required reports to us.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 51 FR 10616, Mar. 28, 1986]

§ 416.708 What you must report.

This section describes the events that you must report to us. They are -

(a) A change of address. You must report to us any change in your mailing address and any change in the address where you live.

(b) A change in living arrangements. You must report to us any change in the make-up of your household: That is, any person who comes to live in your household and any person who moves out of your household.

(c) A change in income. You must report to us any increase or decrease in your income, and any increase or decrease in the income of -

(1) Your ineligible spouse who lives with you;

(2) Your essential person;

(3) Your parent, if you are an eligible child and your parent lives with you; or

(4) An ineligible child who lives with you.

However, you need not report an increase in your Social Security benefits if the increase is only a cost-of-living adjustment. (For a complete discussion of what we consider income, see subpart K. See subpart M, § 416.1323 regarding suspension because of excess income.) If you receive benefits based on disability, when you or your representative report changes in your earned income, we will issue a receipt to you or your representative until we establish a centralized computer file to record the information that you give us and the date that you make your report. Once the centralized computer file is in place, we will continue to issue receipts to you or your representative if you request us to do so.

(d) A change in resources. You must report to us any resources you receive or part with, and any resources received or parted with by -

(1) Your ineligible spouse who lives with you;

(2) Your essential person; or

(3) Your parent, if you are an eligible child and your parent lives with you. (For a complete discussion of what we consider a resource, see subpart L. See subpart M, § 416.1324 regarding suspension because of excess resources.)

(e) Eligibility for other benefits. You must report to us your eligibility for benefits other than SSI benefits. See §§ 416.210 and 416.1330 regarding your responsibility to apply for any other benefits for which you may be eligible.

(f) Certain deaths.

(1) If you are an eligible individual, you must report the death of your eligible spouse, the death of your ineligible spouse who was living with you, and the death of any other person who was living with you.

(2) If you are an eligible spouse, you must report the death of your spouse, and the death of any other person who was living with you.

(3) If you are an eligible child, you must report the death of a parent who was living with you, and the death of any other person who was living with you.

(4) If you are a representative payee, you must report the death of an eligible individual, eligible spouse, or eligible child whom you represent; and the death of any other person who was living in the household of the individual you represent.

(5) If you have a representative payee, you must report the death of your representative payee.

(g) A change in marital status. You must report to us -

(1) Your marriage, your divorce, or the annulment of your marriage;

(2) The marriage, divorce, or annulment of marriage of your parent who lives with you, if you are an eligible child;

(3) The marriage of an ineligible child who lives with you, if you are an eligible child; and

(4) The marriage of an ineligible child who lives with you if you are an eligible individual living with an ineligible spouse.

(h) Medical improvements. If you are eligible for SSI benefits because of disability or blindness, you must report any improvement in your medical condition to us.

(i) [Reserved]

(j) Refusal to accept treatment for drug addiction or alcoholism; discontinuance of treatment. If you have been medically determined to be a drug addict or an alcoholic, and you refuse to accept treatment for drug addiction or alcoholism at an approved facility or institution, or if you discontinue treatment, you must report your refusal or discontinuance to us.

(k) Admission to or discharge from a medical treatment facility, public institution, or private institution. You must report to us your admission to or discharge from -

(1) A medical treatment facility; or

(2) A public institution (defined in § 416.201); or

(3) A private institution. Private institution means an institution as defined in § 416.201 which is not administered by or the responsibility of a governmental unit.

(l) A change in school attendance. You must report to us -

(1) A change in your school attendance if you are an eligible child;

(2) A change in school attendance of an ineligible child who is at least age 18 but less than 21 and who lives with you if you are an eligible child; and

(3) A change in school attendance of an ineligible child who is at least age 18 but less than 21 and who lives with you if you are an eligible individual living with an ineligible spouse.

(m) A termination of residence in the U.S. You must report to us if you leave the United States voluntarily with the intention of abandoning your residence in the United States or you leave the United States involuntarily (for example, you are deported).

(n) Leaving the U.S. temporarily. You must report to us if you leave the United States for 30 or more consecutive days or for a full calendar month (without the intention of abandoning your residence in the U.S.).

(o) Fleeing to avoid criminal prosecution or custody or confinement after conviction, or violating probation or parole. You must report to us that you are -

(1) Fleeing to avoid prosecution for a crime, or an attempt to commit a crime, which is a felony under the laws of the place from which you flee (or which, in the case of the State of New Jersey, is a high misdemeanor under the laws of that State);

(2) Fleeing to avoid custody or confinement after conviction for a crime, or an attempt to commit a crime, which is a felony under the laws of the place from which you flee (or which, in the case of the State of New Jersey, is a high misdemeanor under the laws of that State); or

(3) Violating a condition of probation or parole imposed under Federal or State law.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 51 FR 10616, Mar. 14, 1986; 65 FR 40495, June 30, 2000; 68 FR 40124, July 7, 2003; 71 FR 66866, Nov. 17, 2006; 72 FR 50874, Sept. 5, 2007]

§ 416.710 What reports must include.

When you make a report you must tell us -

(a) The name and social security number under which benefits are paid;

(b) The name of the person about whom you are reporting;

(c) The event you are reporting and the date it happened; and

(d) Your name.

§ 416.712 Form of the report.

You may make a report in any of the ways described in this section.

(a) Written reports. You may write a report on your own paper or on a printed form supplied by us. You may mail a written report or bring it to one of our offices.

(b) Oral reports. You may report to us by telephone, or you may come to one of our offices and tell one of our employees what you are reporting.

(c) Other forms. You may use any other suitable method of reporting - for example, a telegram or a cable.

§ 416.714 When reports are due.

(a) A reportable event happens. You should report to us as soon as an event listed in § 416.708 happens. If you do not report within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happens, your report will be late. We may impose a penalty deduction from your benefits for a late report (see §§ 416.722 through 416.732).

(b) We request a report. We may request a report from you if we need information to determine continuing eligibility or the correct amount of your SSI benefit payments. If you do not report within 30 days of our written request, we may determine that you are ineligible to receive SSI benefits. We will suspend your benefits effective with the month following the month in which we determine that you are ineligible to receive SSI benefits because of your failure to give us necessary information.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 50 FR 48573, Nov. 26, 1985]

Penalty Deductions
§ 416.722 Circumstances under which we make a penalty deduction.

A penalty deduction is made from your benefits if -

(a) You fail to make a required report on time (see §§ 416.708 and 416.714);

(b) We must reduce, suspend, or terminate your benefits because of the event you have not reported;

(c) You received and accepted an SSI benefit for the penalty period (see §§ 416.724 through 416.728 for penalty period definitions); and

(d) You do not have good cause for not reporting on time (see § 416.732).

§ 416.724 Amounts of penalty deductions.

(a) Amounts deducted. If we find that we must impose a penalty deduction, you will lose from your SSI benefits a total amount of -

(1) $25 for a report overdue in the first penalty period;

(2) $50 for a report overdue in the second penalty period; and

(3) $100 for a report overdue in the third (or any following) penalty period.

(b) Limit on number of penalties. Even though more than one required report is overdue from you at the end of a penalty period, we will limit the number of penalty deductions imposed to one penalty deduction for any one penalty period.

§ 416.726 Penalty period: First failure to report.

(a) First penalty period. The first penalty period begins on the first day of the month you apply for SSI benefits and ends on the day we first learn that you should have made a required report, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of the first penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for the period.

(b) Extension of first penalty period. If you have good cause for not making a report on time (see § 416.732), we will extend the first penalty period to the day when we learn that you should have made another required report, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of the extended first penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for the extended period.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 50 FR 48573, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.728 Penalty period: Second failure to report.

(a) Second penalty period. The second penalty period begins on the day after the first penalty period ends. The second penalty period ends on the day we first learn that you should have made a required report, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. (The event may have happened during the first penalty period, with the reporting due date in the second penalty period. The due date and the failure to report on time are the important factors in establishing a penalty period.) There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of the second penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for the period.

(b) Extension of second penalty period. If you have good cause for not making a report on time (see § 416.732), we will extend the second penalty period to the day when we learn that you should have made another required report, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of the extended second penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for the extended period.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 50 FR 48573, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.730 Penalty period: Three or more failures to report.

(a) Third (or a following) penalty period. A third (or a following) penalty period begins the day after the last penalty period ends. This penalty period ends on the day we first learn that you should have made a required report during the penalty period, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. (The event may have happened during an earlier penalty period, with the reporting due date in the third (or a following) penalty period. The due date and the failure to report on time are the important factors in establishing a penalty period.) There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of a penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for any one penalty period.

(b) Extension of third (or a following) penalty period. Just as with the first and second penalty periods, if you have good cause for not making a report on time during the third (or a following) penalty period (see § 416.732), we will extend the penalty period to the day when we learn that you should have made another required report, but did not do so within 10 days after the close of the month in which the event happened. There may be more than one required report overdue at the end of an extended penalty period, but we will impose no more than one penalty deduction for any one extended penalty period.

[46 FR 5873, Jan. 21, 1981, as amended at 50 FR 48573, Nov. 26, 1985]

§ 416.732 No penalty deduction if you have good cause for failure to report timely.

(a) We will find that you have good cause for failure to report timely and we will not impose a penalty deduction, if -

(1) You are “without fault” as defined in § 416.552; or

(2) Your failure or delay in reporting is not willful. “Not willful” means that -

(i) You did not have full knowledge of the existence of your obligation to make a required report; or

(ii) You did not intentionally, knowingly, and purposely fail to make a required report.

However, in either case we may require that you refund an overpayment caused by your failure to report. See subpart E of this part for waiver of recovery of overpayments.

(b) In determining whether you have good cause for failure to report timely, we will take into account any physical, mental, educational, or linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language) you may have.

[59 FR 1636, Jan. 12, 1994]

Subpart H - Determination of Age
Authority:

Secs. 702(a)(5), 1601, 1614(a)(1) and 1631 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5), 1381, 1382c(a)(1), and 1383).

Source:

39 FR 12731, Apr. 8, 1974, unless otherwise noted.

§ 416.801 Evidence as to age - when required.

An applicant for benefits under title XVI of the Act shall file supporting evidence showing the date of his birth if his age is a condition of eligibility for benefits or is otherwise relevant to the payment of benefits pursuant to such title XVI. Such evidence may also be required by the Administration as to the age of any other individual when such other individual's age is relevant to the determination of the applicant's eligibility or benefit amount. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, if the applicant alleges that he is at least 68 years of age and submits any documentary evidence at least 3 years old which supports his allegation, no further evidence of his age is required. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, if a State required reasonably acceptable evidence of age and provides a statement as to an applicant's age, no further evidence of his age is required unless a statistically valid quality control sample has shown that a State's determination of age procedures do not yield an acceptable low rate of error.

§ 416.802 Type of evidence to be submitted.

Where an individual is required to submit evidence of date of birth as indicated in § 416.801, he shall submit a public record of birth or a religious record of birth or baptism established or recorded before his fifth birthday, if available. Where no such document recorded or established before age 5 is available the individual shall submit as evidence of age another document or documents which may serve as the basis for a determination of the individual's date of birth provided such evidence is corroborated by other evidence or by information in the records of the Administration.

§ 416.803 Evaluation of evidence.

Generally, the highest probative value will be accorded to a public record of birth or a religious record of birth or baptism established or recorded before age 5. Where such record is not available, and other documents are submitted as evidence of age, in determining their probative value, consideration will be given to when such other documents were established or recorded, and the circumstances attending their establishment or recordation. Among the documents which may be submitted for such purpose are: school record, census record, Bible or other family record, church record of baptism or confirmation in youth or early adult life, insurance policy, marriage record, employment record, labor union record, fraternal organization record, military record, voting record, vaccination record, delayed birth certificate, birth certificate of child of applicant, physician's or midwife's record of birth, immigration record, naturalization record, or passport.

§ 416.804 Certified copy in lieu of original.

In lieu of the original of any record, except a Bible or other family record, there may be submitted as evidence of age a copy of such record or a statement as to the date of birth shown by such record, which has been duly certified (see § 404.701(g) of this chapter).

§ 416.805 When additional evidence may be required.

If the evidence submitted is not convincing, additional evidence may be required.

§ 416.806 Expedited adjudication based on documentary evidence of age.

Where documentary evidence of age recorded at least 3 years before the application is filed, which reasonably supports an aged applicant's allegation as to his age, is submitted, payment of benefits may be initiated even though additional evidence of age may be required by §§ 416.801 through 416.805. The applicant will be advised that additional evidence is required and that, if it is subsequently established that the prior finding of age is incorrect, the applicant will be liable for refund of any overpayment he has received. If any of the evidence initially submitted tends to show that the age of the applicant or such other person does not correspond with the alleged age, no benefits will be paid until the evidence required by §§ 416.801 through 416.805 is submitted.

Subpart I - Determining Disability and Blindness
Authority:

Secs. 221(m), 702(a)(5), 1611, 1614, 1619, 1631(a), (c), (d)(1), and (p), and 1633 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 421(m), 902(a)(5), 1382, 1382c, 1382h, 1383(a), (c), (d)(1), and (p), and 1383b); secs. 4(c) and 5, 6(c)-(e), 14(a), and 15, Pub. L. 98-460, 98 Stat. 1794, 1801, 1802, and 1808 (42 U.S.C. 421 note, 423 note, and 1382h note).

Source:

45 FR 55621, Aug. 20, 1980, unless otherwise noted.

General
§ 416.901 Scope of subpart.

In order for you to become entitled to any benefits based upon disability or blindness you must be disabled or blind as defined in title XVI of the Social Security Act. This subpart explains how we determine whether you are disabled or blind. We have organized the rules in the following way.

(a) We define general terms, then discuss who makes our disability or blindness determinations and state that disability and blindness determinations made under other programs are not binding on our determinations.

(b) We explain the term disability and note some of the major factors that are considered in determining whether you are disabled in §§ 416.905 through 416.910.

(c) Sections 416.912 through 416.918 contain our rules on evidence. We explain your responsibilities for submitting evidence of your impairment, state what we consider to be acceptable sources of medical evidence, and describe what information should be included in medical reports.

(d) Our general rules on evaluating disability for adults filing new applications are stated in §§ 416.920 through 416.923. We describe the steps that we go through and the order in which they are considered.

(e) Our general rules on evaluating disability for children filing new applications are stated in § 416.924.

(f) Our rules on medical considerations are found in §§ 416.925 through 416.930. We explain in these rules -

(1) The purpose and use of the Listing of Impairments found in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter;

(2) What we mean by the terms medical equivalence and functional equivalence and how we make those findings;

(3) The effect of a conclusion by your physician that you are disabled;

(4) What we mean by symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings;

(5) How we evaluate pain and other symptoms; and

(6) The effect on your benefits if you fail to follow treatment that is expected to restore your ability to work or, if you are a child, to reduce your functional limitations to the point that they are no longer marked and severe, and how we apply the rule in § 416.930.

(g) In §§ 416.931 through 416.934 we explain that we may make payments on the basis of presumptive disability or presumptive blindness.

(h) In §§ 416.935 through 416.939 we explain the rules which apply in cases of drug addiction and alcoholism.

(i) In §§ 416.945 through 416.946 we explain what we mean by the term residual functional capacity, state when an assessment of residual functional capacity is required, and who may make it.

(j) Our rules on vocational considerations are in §§ 416.960 through 416.969a. We explain in these rules -

(1) When we must consider vocational factors along with the medical evidence;

(2) How we use our residual functional capacity assessment to determine if you can still do your past relevant work or other work;

(3) How we consider the vocational factors of age, education, and work experience;

(4) What we mean by “work which exists in the national economy”;

(5) How we consider the exertional, nonexertional, and skill requirements of work, and when we will consider the limitations or restrictions that result from your impairment(s) and related symptoms to be exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both; and

(6) How we use the Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

(k) Our rules on substantial gainful activity are found in §§ 416.971 through 416.974. These explain what we mean by substantial gainful activity and how we evaluate your work activity.

(l) In §§ 416.981 through 416.985 we discuss blindness.

(m) Our rules on when disability or blindness continues and stops are contained in §§ 416.986 and 416.988 through 416.998. We explain what your responsibilities are in telling us of any events that may cause a change in your disability or blindness status and when we will review to see if you are still disabled. We also explain how we consider the issue of medical improvement (and the exceptions to medical improvement) in determining whether you are still disabled.

[45 FR 55621, Aug. 20, 1980, as amended at 50 FR 50136, Dec. 6, 1985; 56 FR 5553, Feb. 11, 1991; 56 FR 57944, Nov. 14, 1991; 62 FR 6420, Feb. 11, 1997; 65 FR 42788, July 11, 2000; 65 FR 54777, Sept. 11, 2000; 68 FR 51164, Aug. 26, 2003]

§ 416.902 Definitions for this subpart.

As used in the subpart -

(a) Acceptable medical source means a medical source who is a:

(1) Licensed physician (medical or osteopathic doctor);

(2) Licensed psychologist, which includes:

(i) A licensed or certified psychologist at the independent practice level; or

(ii) A licensed or certified school psychologist, or other licensed or certified individual with another title who performs the same function as a school psychologist in a school setting, for impairments of intellectual disability, learning disabilities, and borderline intellectual functioning only;

(3) Licensed optometrist for impairments of visual disorders, or measurement of visual acuity and visual fields only, depending on the scope of practice in the State in which the optometrist practices;

(4) Licensed podiatrist for impairments of the foot, or foot and ankle only, depending on whether the State in which the podiatrist practices permits the practice of podiatry on the foot only, or the foot and ankle;

(5) Qualified speech-language pathologist for speech or language impairments only. For this source, qualified means that the speech-language pathologist must be licensed by the State professional licensing agency, or be fully certified by the State education agency in the State in which he or she practices, or hold a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association;

(6) Licensed audiologist for impairments of hearing loss, auditory processing disorders, and balance disorders within the licensed scope of practice only (with respect to claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017);

(7) Licensed Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, or other licensed advanced practice nurse with another title, for impairments within his or her licensed scope of practice (only with respect to claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017); or

(8) Licensed Physician Assistant for impairments within his or her licensed scope of practice (only with respect to claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017).

(b) Adult means a person who is age 18 or older.

(c) Child means a person who has not attained age 18.

(d) Commissioner means the Commissioner of Social Security or his or her authorized designee.

(e) Disability redetermination means a redetermination of your eligibility based on disability using the rules for new applicants appropriate to your age, except the rules pertaining to performance of substantial gainful activity. For individuals who are working and for whom a disability redetermination is required, we will apply the rules in §§ 416.260 through 416.269. In conducting a disability redetermination, we will not use the rules for determining whether disability continues set forth in § 416.994 or § 416.994a. (See § 416.987.)

(f) Impairment(s) means a medically determinable physical or mental impairment or a combination of medically determinable physical or mental impairments.

(g) Laboratory findings means one or more anatomical, physiological, or psychological phenomena that can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic techniques. Diagnostic techniques include chemical tests (such as blood tests), electrophysiological studies (such as electrocardiograms and electroencephalograms), medical imaging (such as X-rays), and psychological tests.

(h) Marked and severe functional limitations, when used as a phrase, means the standard of disability in the Social Security Act for children claiming SSI benefits based on disability. It is a level of severity that meets, medically equals, or functionally equals the listings. (See §§ 416.906, 416.924, and 416.926a.) The words “marked” and “severe” are also separate terms used throughout this subpart to describe measures of functional limitations; the term “marked” is also used in the listings. (See §§ 416.924 and 416.926a.) The meaning of the words “marked” and “severe” when used as part of the phrase marked and severe functional limitations is not the same as the meaning of the separate terms “marked” and “severe” used elsewhere in 404 and 416. (See §§ 416.924(c) and 416.926a(e).)

(i) Medical source means an individual who is licensed as a healthcare worker by a State and working within the scope of practice permitted under State or Federal law, or an individual who is certified by a State as a speech-language pathologist or a school psychologist and acting within the scope of practice permitted under State or Federal law.

(j) Nonmedical source means a source of evidence who is not a medical source. This includes, but is not limited to:

(1) You;

(2) Educational personnel (for example, school teachers, counselors, early intervention team members, developmental center workers, and daycare center workers);

(3) Public and private social welfare agency personnel; and

(4) Family members, caregivers, friends, neighbors, employers, and clergy.

(k) Objective medical evidence means signs, laboratory findings, or both.

(l) Signs means one or more anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities that can be observed, apart from your statements (symptoms). Signs must be shown by medically acceptable clinical diagnostic techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific psychological abnormalities, e.g., abnormalities of behavior, mood, thought, memory, orientation, development, or perception and must also be shown by observable facts that can be medically described and evaluated.

(m) State agency means an agency of a State designated by that State to carry out the disability or blindness determination function.

(n) Symptoms means your own description of your physical or mental impairment.

(o) The listings means the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. When we refer to an impairment(s) that “meets, medically equals, or functionally equals the listings,” we mean that the impairment(s) meets or medically equals the severity of any listing in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter, as explained in §§ 416.925 and 416.926, or that it functionally equals the severity of the listings, as explained in § 416.926a.

(p) We or us means, as appropriate, either the Social Security Administration or the State agency making the disability or blindness determination.

(q) You, your, me, my and I mean, as appropriate, the person who applies for benefits, the person for whom an application is filed, or the person who is receiving benefits based on disability or blindness.

[82 FR 5873, Jan. 18, 2017, as amended at 83 FR 51836, Oct. 15, 2018]

Determinations
§ 416.903 Who makes disability and blindness determinations.

(a) State agencies. State agencies make disability and blindness determinations for the Commissioner for most persons living in the State. State agencies make these disability and blindness determinations under regulations containing performance standards and other administrative requirements relating to the disability and blindness determination function. States have the option of turning the function over to the Federal Government if they no longer want to make disability determinations. Also, the Commissioner may take the function away from any State which has substantially failed to make disability and blindness determinations in accordance with these regulations. Subpart J of this part contains the rules the States must follow in making disability and blindness determinations.

(b) Social Security Administration. The Social Security Administration will make disability and blindness determinations for -

(1) Any person living in a State which is not making for the Commissioner any disability and blindness determinations or which is not making those determinations for the class of claimants to which that person belongs; and

(2) Any person living outside the United States.

(c) What determinations are authorized. The Commissioner has authorized the State agencies and the Social Security Administration to make determinations about -

(1) Whether you are disabled or blind;

(2) The date your disability or blindness began; and

(3) The date your disability or blindness stopped.

(d) Review of State agency determinations. On review of a State agency determination or redetermination of disability or blindness we may find that -

(1) You are, or are not, disabled or blind, regardless of what the State agency found;

(2) Your disability or blindness began earlier or later than the date found by the State agency; and

(3) Your disability or blindness stopped earlier or later than the date found by the State agency.

(e) Determinations for childhood impairments. In making a determination under title XVI with respect to the disability of a child, we will make reasonable efforts to ensure that a qualified pediatrician or other individual who specializes in a field of medicine appropriate to the child's impairment(s) evaluates the case of the child.

[46 FR 29211, May 29, 1981, as amended at 52 FR 33927, Sept. 9, 1987; 58 FR 47577, Sept. 9, 1993; 62 FR 38454, July 18, 1997; 65 FR 34958, June 1, 2000; 71 FR 16458, Mar. 31, 2006; 72 FR 51178, Sept. 6, 2007; 82 FR 5874, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.903a Program integrity.

We will not use in our program any individual or entity, except to provide existing medical evidence, who is currently excluded, suspended, or otherwise barred from participation in the Medicare or Medicaid programs, or any other Federal or Federally-assisted program; whose license to provide health care services is currently revoked or suspended by any State licensing authority pursuant to adequate due process procedures for reasons bearing on professional competence, professional conduct, or financial integrity; or who until a final determination is made has surrendered such a license while formal disciplinary proceedings involving professional conduct are pending. By individual or entity we mean a medical or psychological consultant, consultative examination provider, or diagnostic test facility. Also see §§ 416.919 and 416.919g(b).

[56 FR 36963, Aug. 1, 1991]

§ 416.903b Evidence from excluded medical sources of evidence.

(a) General. We will not consider evidence from the following medical sources excluded under section 223(d)(5)(C)(i) of the Social Security Act (Act), as amended, unless we find good cause under paragraph (b) of this section:

(1) Any medical source that has been convicted of a felony under section 208 or under section 1632 of the Act;

(2) Any medical source that has been excluded from participation in any Federal health care program under section 1128 of the Act; or

(3) Any medical source that has received a final decision imposing a civil monetary penalty or assessment, or both, for submitting false evidence under section 1129 of the Act.

(b) Good cause. We may find good cause to consider evidence from an excluded medical source of evidence under section 223(d)(5)(C)(i) of the Act, as amended, if:

(1) The evidence from the medical source consists of evidence of treatment that occurred before the date the source was convicted of a felony under section 208 or under section 1632 of the Act;

(2) The evidence from the medical source consists of evidence of treatment that occurred during a period in which the source was not excluded from participation in any Federal health care program under section 1128 of the Act;

(3) The evidence from the medical source consists of evidence of treatment that occurred before the date the source received a final decision imposing a civil monetary penalty or assessment, or both, for submitting false evidence under section 1129 of the Act;

(4) The sole basis for the medical source's exclusion under section 223(d)(5)(C)(i) of the Act, as amended, is that the source cannot participate in any Federal health care program under section 1128 of the Act, but the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services granted a waiver of the section 1128 exclusion; or

(5) The evidence is a laboratory finding about a physical impairment and there is no indication that the finding is unreliable.

(c) Reporting requirements for excluded medical sources of evidence. Excluded medical sources of evidence (as described in paragraph (a) of this section) must inform us in writing that they are excluded under section 223(d)(5)(C)(i) of the Act, as amended, each time they submit evidence related to a claim for initial or continuing benefits under titles II or XVI of the Act. This reporting requirement applies to evidence that excluded medical sources of evidence submit to us either directly or through a representative, claimant, or other individual or entity.

(1) Excluded medical sources of evidence must provide a written statement, which contains the following information:

(i) A heading stating: “WRITTEN STATEMENT REGARDING SECTION 223(d)(5)(C) OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT - DO NOT REMOVE”

(ii) The name and title of the medical source;

(iii) The applicable excluding event(s) stated in paragraph (a)(1)-(a)(3) of this section;

(iv) The date of the medical source's felony conviction under sections 208 or 1632 of the Act, if applicable;

(v) The date of the imposition of a civil monetary penalty or assessment, or both, for the submission of false evidence, under section 1129 of the Act, if applicable; and

(vi) The basis, effective date, anticipated length of the exclusion, and whether the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services waived the exclusion, if the excluding event was the medical source's exclusion from participation in any Federal health care program under section 1128 of the Act.

(2) The written statement provided by an excluded medical source of evidence may not be removed by any individual or entity prior to submitting evidence to us.

(3) We may request that the excluded medical source of evidence provide us with additional information or clarify any information submitted that bears on the medical source's exclusion(s) under section 223(d)(5)(C)(i) of the Act, as amended.

[81 FR 65540, Sept. 23, 2016]

§ 416.904 Decisions by other governmental agencies and nongovernmental entities.

Other governmental agencies and nongovernmental entities - such as the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, the Department of Labor, the Office of Personnel Management, State agencies, and private insurers - make disability, blindness, employability, Medicaid, workers' compensation, and other benefits decisions for their own programs using their own rules. Because a decision by any other governmental agency or a nongovernmental entity about whether you are disabled, blind, employable, or entitled to any benefits is based on its rules, it is not binding on us and is not our decision about whether you are disabled or blind under our rules. Therefore, in claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017, we will not provide any analysis in our determination or decision about a decision made by any other governmental agency or a nongovernmental entity about whether you are disabled, blind, employable, or entitled to any benefits. However, we will consider all of the supporting evidence underlying the other governmental agency or nongovernmental entity's decision that we receive as evidence in your claim in accordance with § 416.913(a)(1) through (4).

[82 FR 5874, Jan. 18, 2017, as amended at 82 FR 15132, Mar. 27, 2017]

Definition of Disability
§ 416.905 Basic definition of disability for adults.

(a) The law defines disability as the inability to do any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. To meet this definition, you must have a severe impairment(s) that makes you unable to do your past relevant work (see § 416.960(b)) or any other substantial gainful work that exists in the national economy. If your severe impairment(s) does not meet or medically equal a listing in appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of this chapter, we will assess your residual functional capacity as provided in §§ 416.920(e) and 416.945. (See § 416.920(g)(2) and 416.962 for an exception to this rule.) We will use this residual functional capacity assessment to determine if you can do your past relevant work. If we find that you cannot do your past relevant work, we will use the same residual functional capacity assessment and your vocational factors of age, education, and work experience to determine if you can do other work. (See § 416.920(h) for an exception to this rule.)

(b) There are different rules for determining disability for individuals who are statutorily blind. We discuss these in §§ 416.981 through 416.985.

[45 FR 55621, Aug. 20, 1980, as amended at 56 FR 5553, Feb. 11, 1991; 68 FR 51164, Aug. 26, 2003; 77 FR 43495, July 25, 2012]

§ 416.906 Basic definition of disability for children.

If you are under age 18, we will consider you disabled if you have a medically determinable physical or mental impairment or combination of impairments that causes marked and severe functional limitations, and that can be expected to cause death or that has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, if you file a new application for benefits and you are engaging in substantial gainful activity, we will not consider you disabled. We discuss our rules for determining disability in children who file new applications in §§ 416.924 through 416.924b and §§ 416.925 through 416.926a.

[62 FR 6421, Feb. 11, 1997, as amended at 65 FR 54777, Sept. 11, 2000]

§ 416.907 Disability under a State plan.

You will also be considered disabled for payment of supplemental security income benefits if -

(a) You were found to be permanently and totally disabled as defined under a State plan approved under title XIV or XVI of the Social Security Act, as in effect for October 1972;

(b) You received aid under the State plan because of your disability for the month of December 1973 and for at least one month before July 1973; and

(c) You continue to be disabled as defined under the State plan.

§ 416.908 [Reserved]
§ 416.909 How long the impairment must last.

Unless your impairment is expected to result in death, it must have lasted or must be expected to last for a continuous period of at least 12 months. We call this the duration requirement.

§ 416.910 Meaning of substantial gainful activity.

Substantial gainful activity means work that -

(a) Involves doing significant and productive physical or mental duties; and

(b) Is done (or intended) for pay or profit.

(See § 416.972 for further details about what we mean by substantial gainful activity.)

§ 416.911 Definition of disabling impairment.

(a) If you are an adult:

(1) A disabling impairment is an impairment (or combination of impairments) which, of itself, is so severe that it meets or equals a set of criteria in the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter or which, when considered with your age, education and work experience, would result in a finding that you are disabled under § 416.994, unless the disability redetermination rules in § 416.987(b) apply to you.

(2) If the disability redetermination rules in § 416.987 apply to you, a disabling impairment is an impairment or combination of impairments that meets the requirements in §§ 416.920 (c) through (f).

(b) If you are a child, a disabling impairment is an impairment (or combination of impairments) that causes marked and severe functional limitations. This means that the impairment or combination of impairments:

(1) Must meet, medically equal, or functionally equal the listings, or

(2) Would result in a finding that you are disabled under § 416.994a.

(c) In determining whether you have a disabling impairment, earnings are not considered.

[62 FR 6421, Feb. 11, 1997, as amended at 65 FR 54777, Sept. 11, 2000]

Evidence
§ 416.912 Responsibility for evidence.

(a) Your responsibility -

(1) General. In general, you have to prove to us that you are blind or disabled. You must inform us about or submit all evidence known to you that relates to whether or not you are blind or disabled (see § 416.913). This duty is ongoing and requires you to disclose any additional related evidence about which you become aware. This duty applies at each level of the administrative review process, including the Appeals Council level if the evidence relates to the period on or before the date of the administrative law judge hearing decision. We will consider only impairment(s) you say you have or about which we receive evidence. When you submit evidence received from another source, you must submit that evidence in its entirety, unless you previously submitted the same evidence to us or we instruct you otherwise. If we ask you, you must inform us about:

(i) Your medical source(s);

(ii) Your age;

(iii) Your education and training;

(iv) Your work experience;

(v) Your daily activities both before and after the date you say that you became disabled;

(vi) Your efforts to work; and

(vii) Any other factors showing how your impairment(s) affects your ability to work, or, if you are a child, your functioning. In §§ 416.960 through 416.969, we discuss in more detail the evidence we need when we consider vocational factors.

(2) Completeness. The evidence in your case record must be complete and detailed enough to allow us to make a determination or decision about whether you are disabled or blind. It must allow us to determine -

(i) The nature and severity of your impairment(s) for any period in question;

(ii) Whether the duration requirement described in § 416.909 is met; and

(iii) Your residual functional capacity to do work-related physical and mental activities, when the evaluation steps described in §§ 416.920(e) or (f)(1) apply, or, if you are a child, how you typically function compared to children your age who do not have impairments.

(3) Statutory blindness. If you are applying for benefits on the basis of statutory blindness, we will require an examination by a physician skilled in diseases of the eye or by an optometrist, whichever you may select.

(b) Our responsibility -

(1) Development. Before we make a determination that you are not disabled, we will develop your complete medical history for at least the 12 months preceding the month in which you file your application unless there is a reason to believe that development of an earlier period is necessary or unless you say that your disability began less than 12 months before you filed your application. We will make every reasonable effort to help you get medical evidence from your own medical sources and entities that maintain your medical sources' evidence when you give us permission to request the reports.

(i) Every reasonable effort means that we will make an initial request for evidence from your medical source or entity that maintains your medical source's evidence, and, at any time between 10 and 20 calendar days after the initial request, if the evidence has not been received, we will make one follow-up request to obtain the medical evidence necessary to make a determination. The medical source or entity that maintains your medical source's evidence will have a minimum of 10 calendar days from the date of our follow-up request to reply, unless our experience with that source indicates that a longer period is advisable in a particular case.

(ii) Complete medical history means the records of your medical source(s) covering at least the 12 months preceding the month in which you file your application. If you say that your disability began less than 12 months before you filed your application, we will develop your complete medical history beginning with the month you say your disability began unless we have reason to believe your disability began earlier.

(2) Obtaining a consultative examination. We may ask you to attend one or more consultative examinations at our expense. See §§ 416.917 through 416.919t for the rules governing the consultative examination process. Generally, we will not request a consultative examination until we have made every reasonable effort to obtain evidence from your own medical sources. We may order a consultative examination while awaiting receipt of medical source evidence in some instances, such as when we know a source is not productive, is uncooperative, or is unable to provide certain tests or procedures. We will not evaluate this evidence until we have made every reasonable effort to obtain evidence from your medical sources.

(3) Other work. In order to determine under § 416.920(g) that you are able to adjust to other work, we must provide evidence about the existence of work in the national economy that you can do (see §§ 416.960 through 416.969a), given your residual functional capacity (which we have already assessed, as described in § 416.920(e)), age, education, and work experience.

[82 FR 5874, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.913 Categories of evidence.

(a) What we mean by evidence. Subject to the provisions of paragraph (b), evidence is anything you or anyone else submits to us or that we obtain that relates to your claim. We consider evidence under §§ 416.920b, 416.920c (or under § 416.927 for claims filed (see § 416.325) before March 27, 2017). We evaluate evidence we receive according to the rules pertaining to the relevant category of evidence. The categories of evidence are:

(1) Objective medical evidence. Objective medical evidence is medical signs, laboratory findings, or both, as defined in § 416.902(k).

(2) Medical opinion. A medical opinion is a statement from a medical source about what you can still do despite your impairment(s) and whether you have one or more impairment-related limitations or restrictions in the abilities listed in paragraphs (a)(2)(i)(A) through (D) and (a)(2)(ii)(A) through (F) of this section. (For claims filed (see § 416.325) before March 27, 2017, see § 416.927(a) for the definition of medical opinion.)

(i) Medical opinions in adult claims are about impairment-related limitations and restrictions in:

(A) Your ability to perform physical demands of work activities, such as sitting, standing, walking, lifting, carrying, pushing, pulling, or other physical functions (including manipulative or postural functions, such as reaching, handling, stooping, or crouching);

(B) Your ability to perform mental demands of work activities, such as understanding; remembering; maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace; carrying out instructions; or responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers, or work pressures in a work setting;

(C) Your ability to perform other demands of work, such as seeing, hearing, or using other senses; and

(D) Your ability to adapt to environmental conditions, such as temperature extremes or fumes.

(ii) Medical opinions in child claims are about impairment-related limitations and restrictions in your abilities in the six domains of functioning:

(A) Acquiring and using information (see § 416.926a(g));

(B) Attending and completing tasks (see § 416.926a(h));

(C) Interacting and relating with others (see § 416.926a(i));

(D) Moving about and manipulating objects (see § 416.926a(j));

(E) Caring for yourself (see § 416.926a(k)); and

(F) Health and physical well-being (see § 416.926a(l)).

(3) Other medical evidence. Other medical evidence is evidence from a medical source that is not objective medical evidence or a medical opinion, including judgments about the nature and severity of your impairments, your medical history, clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment prescribed with response, or prognosis. (For claims filed (see § 416.325) before March 27, 2017, other medical evidence does not include a diagnosis, prognosis, or a statement that reflects a judgment(s) about the nature and severity of your impairment(s)).

(4) Evidence from nonmedical sources. Evidence from nonmedical sources is any information or statement(s) from a nonmedical source (including you) about any issue in your claim. We may receive evidence from nonmedical sources either directly from the nonmedical source or indirectly, such as from forms we receive and our administrative records.

(5) Prior administrative medical finding. A prior administrative medical finding is a finding, other than the ultimate determination about whether you are disabled, about a medical issue made by our Federal and State agency medical and psychological consultants at a prior level of review (see § 416.1400) in your current claim based on their review of the evidence in your case record, such as:

(i) The existence and severity of your impairment(s);

(ii) The existence and severity of your symptoms;

(iii) Statements about whether your impairment(s) meets or medically equals any listing in the Listing of Impairments in Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 1;

(iv) If you are a child, statements about whether your impairment(s) functionally equals the listings in Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 1;

(v) If you are an adult, your residual functional capacity;

(vi) Whether your impairment(s) meets the duration requirement; and

(vii) How failure to follow prescribed treatment (see § 416.930) and drug addiction and alcoholism (see § 416.935) relate to your claim.

(b) Exceptions for privileged communications.

(1) The privileged communications listed in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) and (b)(1)(ii) of this section are not evidence, and we will neither consider nor provide any analysis about them in your determination or decision. This exception for privileged communications applies equally whether your representative is an attorney or a non-attorney.

(i) Oral or written communications between you and your representative that are subject to the attorney-client privilege, unless you voluntarily disclose the communication to us.

(ii) Your representative's analysis of your claim, unless he or she voluntarily discloses it to us. This analysis means information that is subject to the attorney work product doctrine, but it does not include medical evidence, medical opinions, or any other factual matter that we may consider in determining whether or not you are entitled to benefits (see paragraph (b)(2) of this section).

(2) The attorney-client privilege generally protects confidential communications between an attorney and his or her client that are related to providing or obtaining legal advice. The attorney work product doctrine generally protects an attorney's analyses, theories, mental impressions, and notes. In the context of your disability claim, neither the attorney-client privilege nor the attorney work product doctrine allow you to withhold factual information, medical opinions, or other medical evidence that we may consider in determining whether or not you are entitled to benefits. For example, if you tell your representative about the medical sources you have seen, your representative cannot refuse to disclose the identity of those medical sources to us based on the attorney-client privilege. As another example, if your representative asks a medical source to complete an opinion form related to your impairment(s), symptoms, or limitations, your representative cannot withhold the completed opinion form from us based on the attorney work product doctrine. The attorney work product doctrine would not protect the source's opinions on the completed form, regardless of whether or not your representative used the form in his or her analysis of your claim or made handwritten notes on the face of the report.

[82 FR 5875, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.913a Evidence from our Federal or State agency medical or psychological consultants.

The following rules apply to our Federal or State agency medical or psychological consultants that we consult in connection with administrative law judge hearings and Appeals Council reviews:

(a) In claims adjudicated by the State agency, a State agency medical or psychological consultant may make the determination of disability together with a State agency disability examiner or provide medical evidence to a State agency disability examiner when the disability examiner makes the initial or reconsideration determination alone (see § 416.1015(c) of this part). The following rules apply:

(1) When a State agency medical or psychological consultant makes the determination together with a State agency disability examiner at the initial or reconsideration level of the administrative review process as provided in § 416.1015(c)(1), he or she will consider the evidence in your case record and make administrative findings about the medical issues, including, but not limited to, the existence and severity of your impairment(s), the existence and severity of your symptoms, whether your impairment(s) meets or medically equals the requirements for any impairment listed in appendix 1 to this subpart, and your residual functional capacity. These administrative medical findings are based on the evidence in your case but are not in themselves evidence at the level of the administrative review process at which they are made. See § 416.913(a)(5).

(2) When a State agency disability examiner makes the initial determination alone as provided in § 416.1015(c)(3), he or she may obtain medical evidence from a State agency medical or psychological consultant about one or more of the medical issues listed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. In these cases, the State agency disability examiner will consider the medical evidence of the State agency medical or psychological consultant under §§ 416.920b, 416.920c, and 416.927.

(3) When a State agency disability examiner makes a reconsideration determination alone as provided in § 416.1015(c)(3), he or she will consider prior administrative medical findings made by a State agency medical or psychological consultant at the initial level of the administrative review process, and any medical evidence provided by such consultants at the initial and reconsideration levels, about one or more of the medical issues listed in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section under §§ 416.920b, 416.920c, and 416.927.

(b) Administrative law judges are responsible for reviewing the evidence and making administrative findings of fact and conclusions of law. They will consider prior administrative medical findings and medical evidence from our Federal or State agency medical or psychological consultants as follows:

(1) Administrative law judges are not required to adopt any prior administrative medical findings, but they must consider this evidence according to §§ 416.920b, 416.920c, and 416.927, as appropriate, because our Federal or State agency medical or psychological consultants are highly qualified and experts in Social Security disability evaluation.

(2) Administrative law judges may also ask for medical evidence from expert medical sources. Administrative law judges will consider this evidence under §§ 416.920b, 416.920c, and 416.927, as appropriate.

(c) When the Appeals Council makes a decision, it will consider prior administrative medical findings according to the same rules for considering prior administrative medical findings as administrative law judges follow under paragraph (b) of this section.

[82 FR 5876, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.914 When we will purchase existing evidence.

We need specific medical evidence to determine whether you are disabled or blind. We will pay for the medical evidence we request, if there is a charge. We will also be responsible for the cost of medical evidence we ask you to get.

§ 416.915 Where and how to submit evidence.

You may give us evidence about your impairment at any of our offices or at the office of any State agency authorized to make disability or blindness determinations. You may also give evidence to one of our employees authorized to accept evidence at another place. For more information about this, see subpart C of this part.

§ 416.916 If you fail to submit medical and other evidence.

You (and if you are a child, your parent, guardian, relative, or other person acting on your behalf) must co-operate in furnishing us with, or in helping us to obtain or identify, available medical or other evidence about your impairment(s). When you fail to cooperate with us in obtaining evidence, we will have to make a decision based on information available in your case. We will not excuse you from giving us evidence because you have religious or personal reasons against medical examinations, tests, or treatment.

[58 FR 47577, Sept. 9, 1993]

§ 416.917 Consultative examination at our expense.

If your medical sources cannot or will not give us sufficient medical evidence about your impairment for us to determine whether you are disabled or blind, we may ask you to have one or more physical or mental examinations or tests. We will pay for these examinations. However, we will not pay for any medical examination arranged by you or your representative without our advance approval. If we arrange for the examination or test, we will give you reasonable notice of the date, time, and place the examination or test will be given, and the name of the person or facility who will do it. We will also give the examiner any necessary background information about your condition.

[56 FR 36964, Aug. 1, 1991]

§ 416.918 If you do not appear at a consultative examination.

(a) General. If you are applying for benefits and do not have a good reason for failing or refusing to take part in a consultative examination or test which we arrange for you to get information we need to determine your disability or blindness, we may find that you are not disabled or blind. If you are already receiving benefits and do not have a good reason for failing or refusing to take part in a consultative examination or test which we arranged for you, we may determine that your disability or blindness has stopped because of your failure or refusal. Therefore, if you have any reason why you cannot go for the scheduled appointment, you should tell us about this as soon as possible before the examination date. If you have a good reason, we will schedule another examination. We will consider your physical, mental, educational, and linguistic limitations (including any lack of facility with the English language) when determining if you have a good reason for failing to attend a consultative examination.

(b) Examples of good reasons for failure to appear. Some examples of what we consider good reasons for not going to a scheduled examination include -

(1) Illness on the date of the scheduled examination or test;

(2) Not receiving timely notice of the scheduled examination or test, or receiving no notice at all;

(3) Being furnished incorrect or incomplete information, or being given incorrect information about the physician involved or the time or place of the examination or test, or;

(4) Having had death or serious illness occur in your immediate family.

(c) Objections by your medical source(s). If any of your medical sources tell you that you should not take the examination or test, you should tell us at once. In many cases, we may be able to get the information we need in another way. Your medical source(s) may agree to another type of examination for the same purpose.

[45 FR 55621, Aug. 20, 1980, as amended at 59 FR 1636, Jan. 12, 1994; 82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

Standards To Be Used in Determining When a Consultative Examination Will Be Obtained in Connection With Disability Determinations
§ 416.919 The consultative examination.

A consultative examination is a physical or mental examination or test purchased for you at our request and expense from a treating source or another medical source, including a pediatrician when appropriate. The decision to purchase a consultative examination will be made on an individual case basis in accordance with the provisions of § 416.919a through § 416.919f. Selection of the source for the examination will be consistent with the provisions of § 416.903a and §§ 416.919g through 416.919j. The rules and procedures for requesting consultative examinations set forth in §§ 416.919a and 416.919b are applicable at the reconsideration and hearing levels of review, as well as the initial level of determination.

[56 FR 36964, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000]

§ 416.919a When we will purchase a consultative examination and how we will use it.

(a) General. If we cannot get the information we need from your medical sources, we may decide to purchase a consultative examination. See § 416.912 for the procedures we will follow to obtain evidence from your medical sources and § 416.920b for how we consider evidence. Before purchasing a consultative examination, we will consider not only existing medical reports, but also the disability interview form containing your allegations as well as other pertinent evidence in your file.

(b) Situations that may require a consultative examination. We may purchase a consultative examination to try to resolve an inconsistency in the evidence or when the evidence as a whole is insufficient to support a determination or decision on your claim. Some examples of when we might purchase a consultative examination to secure needed medical evidence, such as clinical findings, laboratory tests, a diagnosis, or prognosis, include but are not limited to:

(1) The additional evidence needed is not contained in the records of your medical sources;

(2) The evidence that may have been available from your treating or other medical sources cannot be obtained for reasons beyond your control, such as death or noncooperation of a medical source;

(3) Highly technical or specialized medical evidence that we need is not available from your treating or other medical sources; or

(4) There is an indication of a change in your condition that is likely to affect your ability to work, or, if you are a child, your functioning, but the current severity of your impairment is not established.

[56 FR 36964, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 62 FR 6421, Feb. 11, 1997; 77 FR 10656, Feb. 23, 2012]

§ 416.919b When we will not purchase a consultative examination.

We will not purchase a consultative examination in situations including, but not limited to, the following situations:

(a) When any issues about your actual performance of substantial gainful activity have not been resolved;

(b) When you do not meet all of the nondisability requirements.

[56 FR 36965, Aug. 1, 1991]

Standards for the Type of Referral and for Report Content
§ 416.919f Type of purchased examinations.

We will purchase only the specific examinations and tests we need to make a determination in your claim. For example, we will not authorize a comprehensive medical examination when the only evidence we need is a special test, such as an X-ray, blood studies, or an electrocardiogram.

[56 FR 36965, Aug. 1, 1991]

§ 416.919g Who we will select to perform a consultative examination.

(a) We will purchase a consultative examination only from a qualified medical source. The medical source may be your own medical source or another medical source. If you are a child, the medical source we choose may be a pediatrician.

(b) By “qualified,” we mean that the medical source must be currently licensed in the State and have the training and experience to perform the type of examination or test we will request; the medical source must not be barred from participation in our programs under the provisions of § 416.903a. The medical source must also have the equipment required to provide an adequate assessment and record of the existence and level of severity of your alleged impairments.

(c) The medical source we choose may use support staff to help perform the consultative examination. Any such support staff (e.g., X-ray technician, nurse) must meet appropriate licensing or certification requirements of the State. See § 416.903a.

[56 FR 36965, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000; 82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.919h Your medical source.

When, in our judgment, your medical source is qualified, equipped, and willing to perform the additional examination or test(s) for the fee schedule payment, and generally furnishes complete and timely reports, your medical source will be the preferred source for the purchased examination or test(s).

[82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.919i Other sources for consultative examinations.

We will use a different medical source than your medical source for a purchased examination or test in situations including, but not limited to, the following:

(a) Your medical source prefers not to perform such an examination or does not have the equipment to provide the specific data needed;

(b) There are conflicts or inconsistencies in your file that cannot be resolved by going back to your medical source;

(c) You prefer a source other than your medical source and have a good reason for your preference;

(d) We know from prior experience that your medical source may not be a productive source, such as when he or she has consistently failed to provide complete or timely reports; or

(e) Your medical source is not a qualified medical source as defined in § 416.919g.

[82 FR 5877, Jan, 18, 2017]

§ 416.919j Objections to the medical source designated to perform the consultative examination.

You or your representative may object to your being examined by a medical source we have designated to perform a consultative examination. If there is a good reason for the objection, we will schedule the examination with another medical source. A good reason may be that the medical source we designated had previously represented an interest adverse to you. For example, the medical source may have represented your employer in a workers' compensation case or may have been involved in an insurance claim or legal action adverse to you. Other things we will consider include: The presence of a language barrier, the medical source's office location (e.g., 2nd floor, no elevator), travel restrictions, and whether the medical source had examined you in connection with a previous disability determination or decision that was unfavorable to you. If your objection is that a medical source allegedly “lacks objectivity” in general, but not in relation to you personally, we will review the allegations. See § 416.919s. To avoid a delay in processing your claim, the consultative examination in your case will be changed to another medical source while a review is being conducted. We will handle any objection to use of the substitute medical source in the same manner. However, if we had previously conducted such a review and found that the reports of the medical source in question conformed to our guidelines, we will not change your examination.

[65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000]

§ 416.919k Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.

We may purchase medical examinations, including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function studies, electrocardiograms, and stress tests) from a medical source.

(a) The rate of payment for purchasing medical or other services necessary to make determinations of disability may not exceed the highest rate paid by Federal or public agencies in the State for the same or similar types of service. See §§ 416.1024 and 416.1026 of this part.

(b) If a physician's bill, or a request for payment for a physician's services, includes a charge for a laboratory test for which payment may be made under this part, the amount payable with respect to the test shall be determined as follows:

(1) If the bill or request for payment indicates that the test was personally performed or supervised by the physician who submitted the bill (or for whose services the request for payment was made) or by another physician with whom that physician shares his or her practice, the payment will be based on the physician's usual and customary charge for the test or the rates of payment which the State uses for purchasing such services, whichever is the lesser amount.

(2) If the bill or request for payment indicates that the test was performed by an independent laboratory, the amount of reimbursement will not exceed the billed cost of the independent laboratory or the rate of payment which the State uses for purchasing such services, whichever is the lesser amount. A nominal payment may be made to the physician for collecting, handling and shipping a specimen to the laboratory if the physician bills for such a service. The total reimbursement may not exceed the rate of payment which the State uses for purchasing such services.

(c) The State will assure that it can support the rate of payment it uses. The State shall also be responsible for monitoring and overseeing the rate of payment it uses to ensure compliance with paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

[56 FR 36965, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000; 71 FR 16459, Mar. 31, 2006; 76 FR 24810, May 3, 2011]

§ 416.919m Diagnostic tests or procedures.

We will request the results of any diagnostic tests or procedures that have been performed as part of a workup by your treating source or other medical source and will use the results to help us evaluate impairment severity or prognosis. However, we will not order diagnostic tests or procedures that involve significant risk to you, such as myelograms, arteriograms, or cardiac catheterizations for the evaluation of disability under the Supplemental Security Income program. A State agency medical consultant must approve the ordering of any diagnostic test or procedure when there is a chance it may involve significant risk. The responsibility for deciding whether to perform the examination rests with the medical source designated to perform the consultative examination.

[56 FR 36966, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000; 71 FR 16459, Mar. 31, 2006; 76 FR 24810, May 3, 2011]

§ 416.919n Informing the medical source of examination scheduling, report content, and signature requirements.

The medical sources who perform consultative examinations will have a good understanding of our disability programs and their evidentiary requirements. They will be made fully aware of their responsibilities and obligations regarding confidentiality as described in § 401.105(e). We will fully inform medical sources who perform consultative examinations at the time we first contact them, and at subsequent appropriate intervals, of the following obligations:

(a) Scheduling. In scheduling full consultative examinations, sufficient time should be allowed to permit the medical source to take a case history and perform the examination, including any needed tests. The following minimum scheduling intervals (i.e., time set aside for the individual, not the actual duration of the consultative examination) should be used.

(1) Comprehensive general medical examination - at least 30 minutes;

(2) Comprehensive musculoskeletal or neurological examination - at least 20 minutes;

(3) Comprehensive psychiatric examination - at least 40 minutes;

(4) Psychological examination - at least 60 minutes (Additional time may be required depending on types of psychological tests administered); and

(5) All others - at least 30 minutes, or in accordance with accepted medical practices.

We recognize that actual practice will dictate that some examinations may require longer scheduling intervals depending on the circumstances in a particular situation. We also recognize that these minimum intervals may have to be adjusted to allow for those claimants that do not attend their scheduled examination. The purpose of these minimum scheduling timeframes is to ensure that such examinations are complete and that sufficient time is made available to obtain the information needed to make an accurate determination in your case. State agencies will monitor the scheduling of examinations (through their normal consultative examination oversight activities) to ensure that any overscheduling is avoided, as overscheduling may lead to examinations that are not thorough.

(b) Report content. The reported results of your medical history, examination, requested laboratory findings, discussions and conclusions must conform to accepted professional standards and practices in the medical field for a complete and competent examination. The facts in a particular case and the information and findings already reported in the medical and other evidence of record will dictate the extent of detail needed in the consultative examination report for that case. Thus, the detail and format for reporting the results of a purchased examination will vary depending upon the type of examination or testing requested. The reporting of information will differ from one type of examination to another when the requested examination relates to the performance of tests such as ventilatory function tests, treadmill exercise tests, or audiological tests. The medical report must be complete enough to help us determine the nature, severity, and duration of the impairment, and your residual functional capacity (if you are an adult) or your functioning (if you are a child). The report should reflect your statement of your symptoms, not simply the medical source's statements or conclusions. The medical source's report of the consultative examination should include the objective medical facts as well as observations and opinions.

(c) Elements of a complete consultative examination. A complete consultative examination is one which involves all the elements of a standard examination in the applicable medical specialty. When the report of a complete consultative examination is involved, the report should include the following elements:

(1) Your major or chief complaint(s);

(2) A detailed description, within the area of specialty of the examination, of the history of your major complaint(s);

(3) A description, and disposition, of pertinent “positive” and “negative” detailed findings based on the history, examination and laboratory tests related to the major complaint(s), and any other abnormalities or lack thereof reported or found during examination or laboratory testing;

(4) The results of laboratory and other tests (e.g., X-rays) performed according to the requirements stated in the Listing of Impairments (see appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter);

(5) The diagnosis and prognosis for your impairment(s);

(6) A medical opinion. Although we will ordinarily request a medical opinion as part of the consultative examination process, the absence of a medical opinion in a consultative examination report will not make the report incomplete. See § 416.913(a)(3); and

(7) In addition, the medical source will consider, and provide some explanation or comment on, your major complaint(s) and any other abnormalities found during the history and examination or reported from the laboratory tests. The history, examination, evaluation of laboratory test results, and the conclusions will represent the information provided by the medical source who signs the report.

(d) When a complete consultative examination is not required. When the evidence we need does not require a complete consultative examination (for example, we need only a specific laboratory test result to complete the record), we may not require a report containing all of the elements in paragraph (c).

(e) Signature requirements. All consultative examination reports will be personally reviewed and signed by the medical source who actually performed the examination. This attests to the fact that the medical source doing the examination or testing is solely responsible for the report contents and for the conclusions, explanations or comments provided with respect to the history, examination and evaluation of laboratory test results. The signature of the medical source on a report annotated “not proofed” or “dictated but not read” is not acceptable. A rubber stamp signature of a medical source or the medical source's signature entered by any other person is not acceptable.

[56 FR 36966, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 62 FR 6421, Feb. 11, 1997; 62 FR 13733, Mar. 21, 1997; 65 FR 11879, Mar. 7, 2000; 65 FR 54778, Sept. 11, 2000; 82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.919o When a properly signed consultative examination report has not been received.

If a consultative examination report is received unsigned or improperly signed we will take the following action.

(a) When we will make determinations and decisions without a properly signed report. We will make a determination or decision in the circumstances specified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section without waiting for a properly signed consultative examination report. After we have made the determination or decision, we will obtain a properly signed report and include it in the file unless the medical source who performed the original consultative examination has died:

(1) Continuous period of disability allowance with an onset date as alleged or earlier than alleged; or

(2) Continuance of disability.

(b) When we will not make determinations and decisions without a properly signed report. We will not use an unsigned or improperly signed consultative examination report to make the determinations or decisions specified in paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2), (b)(3), and (b)(4) of this section. When we need a properly signed consultative examination report to make these determinations or decisions, we must obtain such a report. If the signature of the medical source who performed the original examination cannot be obtained because the medical source is out of the country for an extended period of time, or on an extended vacation, seriously ill, deceased, or for any other reason, the consultative examination will be rescheduled with another medical source:

(1) Denial; or

(2) Cessation; or

(3) Allowance of disability which has ended; or

(4) Allowance with an onset date later than the filing date.

[56 FR 36967, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11880, Mar. 7, 2000]

§ 416.919p Reviewing reports of consultative examinations.

(a) We will review the report of the consultative examination to determine whether the specific information requested has been furnished. We will consider the following factors in reviewing the report:

(1) Whether the report provides evidence which serves as an adequate basis for decisionmaking in terms of the impairment it assesses;

(2) Whether the report is internally consistent; Whether all the diseases, impairments and complaints described in the history are adequately assessed and reported in the clinical findings; Whether the conclusions correlate the findings from your medical history, clinical examination and laboratory tests and explain all abnormalities;

(3) Whether the report is consistent with the other information available to us within the specialty of the examination requested; Whether the report fails to mention an important or relevant complaint within that specialty that is noted in other evidence in the file (e.g., your blindness in one eye, amputations, pain, alcoholism, depression);

(4) Whether this is an adequate report of examination as compared to standards set out in the course of a medical education; and

(5) Whether the report is properly signed.

(b) If the report is inadequate or incomplete, we will contact the medical source who performed the consultative examination, give an explanation of our evidentiary needs, and ask that the medical source furnish the missing information or prepare a revised report.

(c) With your permission, or when the examination discloses new diagnostic information or test results that reveal a potentially life-threatening situation, we will refer the consultative examination report to your treating source. When we refer the consultative examination report to your treating source without your permission, we will notify you that we have done so.

(d) We will perform ongoing special management studies on the quality of consultative examinations purchased from major medical sources and the appropriateness of the examinations authorized.

(e) We will take steps to ensure that consultative examinations are scheduled only with medical sources who have access to the equipment required to provide an adequate assessment and record of the existence and level of severity of your alleged impairments.

[56 FR 36967, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11880, Mar. 7, 2000]

§ 416.919q Conflict of interest.

All implications of possible conflict of interest between medical or psychological consultants and their medical or psychological practices will be avoided. Such consultants are not only those physicians and psychologists who work for us directly but are also those who do review and adjudication work in the State agencies. Physicians and psychologists who work for us directly as employees or under contract will not work concurrently for a State agency. Physicians and psychologists who do review work for us will not perform consultative examinations for us without our prior approval. In such situations, the physician or psychologist will disassociate himself or herself from further involvement in the case and will not participate in the evaluation, decision, or appeal actions. In addition, neither they, nor any member of their families, will acquire or maintain, either directly or indirectly, any financial interest in a medical partnership, corporation, or similar relationship in which consultative examinations are provided. Sometimes physicians and psychologists who do review work for us will have prior knowledge of a case; for example, when the claimant was a patient. Where this is so, the physician or psychologist will not participate in the review or determination of the case. This does not preclude the physician or psychologist from submitting medical evidence based on treatment or examination of the claimant.

[56 FR 36967, Aug. 1, 1991]

Authorizing and Monitoring the Referral Process
§ 416.919s Authorizing and monitoring the consultative examination.

(a) Day-to-day responsibility for the consultative examination process rests with the State agencies that make disability determinations for us.

(b) The State agency will maintain a good working relationship with the medical community in order to recruit sufficient numbers of physicians and other providers of medical services to ensure ready availability of consultative examination providers.

(c) Consistent with Federal and State laws, the State agency administrator will work to achieve appropriate rates of payment for purchased medical services.

(d) Each State agency will be responsible for comprehensive oversight management of its consultative examination program, with special emphasis on key providers.

(e) A key consultative examination provider is a provider that meets at least one of the following conditions:

(1) Any consultative examination provider with an estimated annual billing to the disability programs we administer of at least $150,000; or

(2) Any consultative examination provider with a practice directed primarily towards evaluation examinations rather than the treatment of patients; or

(3) Any consultative examination provider that does not meet the above criteria, but is one of the top five consultative examination providers in the State by dollar volume, as evidenced by prior year data.

(f) State agencies have flexibility in managing their consultative examination programs, but at a minimum will provide:

(1) An ongoing active recruitment program for consultative examination providers;

(2) A process for orientation, training, and review of new consultative examination providers, with respect to SSA's program requirements involving consultative examination report content and not with respect to medical techniques;

(3) Procedures for control of scheduling consultative examinations;

(4) Procedures to ensure that close attention is given to specific evaluation issues involved in each case;

(5) Procedures to ensure that only required examinations and tests are authorized in accordance with the standards set forth in this subpart;

(6) Procedures for providing medical or supervisory approval for the authorization or purchase of consultative examinations and for additional tests or studies requested by consulting medical sources. This includes physician approval for the ordering of any diagnostic test or procedure where the question of significant risk to the claimant/beneficiary might be raised. See § 416.919m.

(7) procedures for the ongoing review of consultative examination results to ensure compliance with written guidelines;

(8) Procedures to encourage active participation by physicians and psychologists in the consultative examination oversight program;

(9) Procedures for handling complaints;

(10) Procedures for evaluating claimant reactions to key providers; and

(11) A program of systematic, onsite reviews of key providers that will include annual onsite reviews of such providers when claimants are present for examinations. This provision does not contemplate that such reviews will involve participation in the actual examinations but, rather, offer an opportunity to talk with claimants at the provider's site before and after the examination and to review the provider's overall operation.

(g) The State agencies will cooperate with us when we conduct monitoring activities in connection with their oversight management of their consultative examination programs.

[56 FR 36967, Aug. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 11880, Mar. 7, 2000; 71 FR 16459, Mar. 31, 2006; 75 FR 32846, June 10, 2010; 76 FR 24810, May 3, 2011]

Procedures To Monitor the Consultative Examination
§ 416.919t Consultative examination oversight.

(a) We will ensure that referrals for consultative examinations and purchases of consultative examinations are made in accordance with our policies. We will also monitor both the referral processes and the product of the consultative examinations obtained. This monitoring may include reviews by independent medical specialists under direct contract with SSA.

(b) Through our regional offices, we will undertake periodic comprehensive reviews of each State agency to evaluate each State's management of the consultative examination process. The review will involve visits to key providers, with State staff participating, including a program physician when the visit will deal with medical techniques or judgment, or factors that go to the core of medical professionalism.

(c) We will also perform ongoing special management studies of the quality of consultative examinations purchased from key providers and other sources and the appropriateness of the examinations authorized.

[56 FR 36968, Aug. 1, 1991]

Evaluation of Disability
§ 416.920 Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

(a) General -

(1) Purpose of this section. This section explains the five-step sequential evaluation process we use to decide whether you are disabled, as defined in § 416.905.

(2) Applicability of these rules. These rules apply to you if you are age 18 or older and you file an application for Supplemental Security Income disability benefits.

(3) Evidence considered. We will consider all evidence in your case record when we make a determination or decision whether you are disabled. See § 416.920b.

(4) The five-step sequential evaluation process. The sequential evaluation process is a series of five “steps” that we follow in a set order. See paragraph (h) of this section for an exception to this rule. If we can find that you are disabled or not disabled at a step, we make our determination or decision and we do not go on to the next step. If we cannot find that you are disabled or not disabled at a step, we go on to the next step. Before we go from step three to step four, we assess your residual functional capacity. (See paragraph (e) of this section.) We use this residual functional capacity assessment at both step four and at step five when we evaluate your claim at these steps. These are the five steps we follow:

(i) At the first step, we consider your work activity, if any. If you are doing substantial gainful activity, we will find that you are not disabled. (See paragraph (b) of this section.)

(ii) At the second step, we consider the medical severity of your impairment(s). If you do not have a severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment that meets the duration requirement in § 416.909, or a combination of impairments that is severe and meets the duration requirement, we will find that you are not disabled. (See paragraph (c) of this section.)

(iii) At the third step, we also consider the medical severity of your impairment(s). If you have an impairment(s) that meets or equals one of our listings in appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of this chapter and meets the duration requirement, we will find that you are disabled. (See paragraph (d) of this section.)

(iv) At the fourth step, we consider our assessment of your residual functional capacity and your past relevant work. If you can still do your past relevant work, we will find that you are not disabled. See paragraphs (f) and (h) of this section and § 416.960(b).

(v) At the fifth and last step, we consider our assessment of your residual functional capacity and your age, education, and work experience to see if you can make an adjustment to other work. If you can make an adjustment to other work, we will find that you are not disabled. If you cannot make an adjustment to other work, we will find that you are disabled. See paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section and § 416.960(c).

(5) When you are already receiving disability benefits. If you are already receiving disability benefits, we will use a different sequential evaluation process to decide whether you continue to be disabled. We explain this process in § 416.994(b)(5).

(b) If you are working. If you are working and the work you are doing is substantial gainful activity, we will find that you are not disabled regardless of your medical condition or your age, education, and work experience.

(c) You must have a severe impairment. If you do not have any impairment or combination of impairments which significantly limits your physical or mental ability to do basic work activities, we will find that you do not have a severe impairment and are, therefore, not disabled. We will not consider your age, education, and work experience.

(d) When your impairment(s) meets or equals a listed impairment in appendix 1. If you have an impairment(s) which meets the duration requirement and is listed in appendix 1 or is equal to a listed impairment(s), we will find you disabled without considering your age, education, and work experience.

(e) When your impairment(s) does not meet or equal a listed impairment. If your impairment(s) does not meet or equal a listed impairment, we will assess and make a finding about your residual functional capacity based on all the relevant medical and other evidence in your case record, as explained in § 416.945. (See paragraph (g)(2) of this section and § 416.962 for an exception to this rule.) We use our residual functional capacity assessment at the fourth step of the sequential evaluation process to determine if you can do your past relevant work (paragraph (f) of this section) and at the fifth step of the sequential evaluation process (if the evaluation proceeds to this step) to determine if you can adjust to other work (paragraph (g) of this section).

(f) Your impairment(s) must prevent you from doing your past relevant work. If we cannot make a determination or decision at the first three steps of the sequential evaluation process, we will compare our residual functional capacity assessment, which we made under paragraph (e) of this section, with the physical and mental demands of your past relevant work. See paragraph (h) of this section and § 416.960(b). If you can still do this kind of work, we will find that you are not disabled.

(g) Your impairment(s) must prevent you from making an adjustment to any other work.

(1) If we find that you cannot do your past relevant work because you have a severe impairment(s) (or you do not have any past relevant work), we will consider the same residual functional capacity assessment we made under paragraph (e) of this section, together with your vocational factors (your age, education, and work experience) to determine if you can make an adjustment to other work. (See § 416.960(c).) If you can make an adjustment to other work, we will find you not disabled. If you cannot, we will find you disabled.

(2) We use different rules if you meet one of the two special medical-vocational profiles described in § 416.962. If you meet one of those profiles, we will find that you cannot make an adjustment to other work, and that you are disabled.

(h) Expedited process. If we do not find you disabled at the third step, and we do not have sufficient evidence about your past relevant work to make a finding at the fourth step, we may proceed to the fifth step of the sequential evaluation process. If we find that you can adjust to other work based solely on your age, education, and the same residual functional capacity assessment we made under paragraph (e) of this section, we will find that you are not disabled and will not make a finding about whether you can do your past relevant work at the fourth step. If we find that you may be unable to adjust to other work or if § 416.962 may apply, we will assess your claim at the fourth step and make a finding about whether you can perform your past relevant work. See paragraph (g) of this section and § 416.960(c).

[50 FR 8728, Mar. 5, 1985; 50 FR 19164, May 7, 1985, as amended at 56 FR 5554, Feb. 11, 1991; 56 FR 36968, Aug. 1, 1991; 65 FR 80308, Dec. 21, 2000; 68 FR 51164, Aug. 26, 2003; 77 FR 10656, Feb. 23, 2012; 77 FR 43495, July 25, 2012]

§ 416.920a Evaluation of mental impairments.

(a) General. The steps outlined in §§ 416.920 and 416.924 apply to the evaluation of physical and mental impairments. In addition, when we evaluate the severity of mental impairments for adults (persons age 18 and over) and in persons under age 18 when Part A of the Listing of Impairments is used, we must follow a special technique at each level in the administrative review process. We describe this special technique in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section. Using this technique helps us:

(1) Identify the need for additional evidence to determine impairment severity;

(2) Consider and evaluate functional consequences of the mental disorder(s) relevant to your ability to work; and

(3) Organize and present our findings in a clear, concise, and consistent manner.

(b) Use of the technique.

(1) Under the special technique, we must first evaluate your pertinent symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings to determine whether you have a medically determinable mental impairment(s). See § 416.921 for more information about what is needed to show a medically determinable impairment. If we determine that you have a medically determinable mental impairment(s), we must specify the symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings that substantiate the presence of the impairment(s) and document our findings in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section.

(2) We must then rate the degree of functional limitation resulting from the impairment(s) in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section and record our findings as set out in paragraph (e) of this section.

(c) Rating the degree of functional limitation.

(1) Assessment of functional limitations is a complex and highly individualized process that requires us to consider multiple issues and all relevant evidence to obtain a longitudinal picture of your overall degree of functional limitation. We will consider all relevant and available clinical signs and laboratory findings, the effects of your symptoms, and how your functioning may be affected by factors including, but not limited to, chronic mental disorders, structured settings, medication, and other treatment.

(2) We will rate the degree of your functional limitation based on the extent to which your impairment(s) interferes with your ability to function independently, appropriately, effectively, and on a sustained basis. Thus, we will consider such factors as the quality and level of your overall functional performance, any episodic limitations, the amount of supervision or assistance you require, and the settings in which you are able to function. See 12.00C through 12.00H of the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of this chapter for more information about the factors we consider when we rate the degree of your functional limitation.

(3) We have identified four broad functional areas in which we will rate the degree of your functional limitation: Understand, remember, or apply information; interact with others; concentrate, persist, or maintain pace; and adapt or manage oneself. See 12.00E of the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

(4) When we rate your degree of limitation in these areas (understand, remember, or apply information; interact with others; concentrate, persist, or maintain pace; and adapt or manage oneself), we will use the following five-point scale: None, mild, moderate, marked, and extreme. The last point on the scale represents a degree of limitation that is incompatible with the ability to do any gainful activity.

(d) Use of the technique to evaluate mental impairments. After we rate the degree of functional limitation resulting from your impairment(s), we will determine the severity of your mental impairment(s).

(1) If we rate the degrees of your limitation as “none” or “mild,” we will generally conclude that your impairment(s) is not severe, unless the evidence otherwise indicates that there is more than a minimal limitation in your ability to do basic work activities (see § 416.922).

(2) If your mental impairment(s) is severe, we must then determine if it meets or is equivalent in severity to a listed mental disorder. We do this by comparing the medical findings about your impairment(s) and the rating of the degree of functional limitation to the criteria of the appropriate listed mental disorder. We will record the presence or absence of the criteria and the rating of the degree of functional limitation on a standard document at the initial and reconsideration levels of the administrative review process, or in the decision at the administrative law judge hearing and Appeals Council levels (in cases in which the Appeals Council issues a decision). See paragraph (e) of this section.

(3) If we find that you have a severe mental impairment(s) that neither meets nor is equivalent in severity to any listing, we will then assess your residual functional capacity.

(e) Documenting application of the technique. At the initial and reconsideration levels of the administrative review process, we will complete a standard document to record how we applied the technique. At the administrative law judge hearing and Appeals Council levels (in cases in which the Appeals Council issues a decision), we will document application of the technique in the decision. The following rules apply:

(1) When a State agency medical or psychological consultant makes the determination together with a State agency disability examiner at the initial or reconsideration level of the administrative review process as provided in § 416.1015(c)(1) of this part, the State agency medical or psychological consultant has overall responsibility for assessing medical severity. A State agency disability examiner may assist in preparing the standard document. However, our medical or psychological consultant must review and sign the document to attest that it is complete and that he or she is responsible for its content, including the findings of fact and any discussion of supporting evidence.

(2) When a State agency disability examiner makes the determination alone as provided in § 416.1015(c)(3), the State agency disability examiner has overall responsibility for assessing medical severity and for completing and signing the standard document.

(3) When a disability hearing officer makes a reconsideration determination as provided in § 416.1015(c)(4), the determination must document application of the technique, incorporating the disability hearing officer's pertinent findings and conclusions based on this technique.

(4) At the administrative law judge hearing and Appeals Council levels, the written decision must incorporate the pertinent findings and conclusions based on the technique. The decision must show the significant history, including examination and laboratory findings, and the functional limitations that were considered in reaching a conclusion about the severity of the mental impairment(s). The decision must include a specific finding as to the degree of limitation in each of the functional areas described in paragraph (c) of this section.

(5) If the administrative law judge requires the services of a medical expert to assist in applying the technique but such services are unavailable, the administrative law judge may return the case to the State agency or the appropriate Federal component, using the rules in § 416.1441 of this part, for completion of the standard document. If, after reviewing the case file and completing the standard document, the State agency or Federal component concludes that a determination favorable to you is warranted, it will process the case using the rules found in § 416.1441(d) or (e) of this part. If, after reviewing the case file and completing the standard document, the State agency or Federal component concludes that a determination favorable to you is not warranted, it will send the completed standard document and the case to the administrative law judge for further proceedings and a decision.

[65 FR 50782, Aug. 21, 2000; 65 FR 60584, Oct. 12, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 16459, Mar. 31, 2006; 75 FR 62682, Oct. 13, 2010; 76 FR 24810, May 3, 2011; 81 FR 66178, Sept. 26, 2016; 82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.920b How we consider evidence.

After we review all of the evidence relevant to your claim, we make findings about what the evidence shows.

(a) Complete and consistent evidence. If all of the evidence we receive, including all medical opinion(s), is consistent and there is sufficient evidence for us to determine whether you are disabled, we will make our determination or decision based on that evidence.

(b) Incomplete or inconsistent evidence. In some situations, we may not be able to make our determination or decision because the evidence in your case record is insufficient or inconsistent. We consider evidence to be insufficient when it does not contain all the information we need to make our determination or decision. We consider evidence to be inconsistent when it conflicts with other evidence, contains an internal conflict, is ambiguous, or when the medical evidence does not appear to be based on medically acceptable clinical or laboratory diagnostic techniques. If the evidence in your case record is insufficient or inconsistent, we may need to take the additional actions in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) If any of the evidence in your case record, including any medical opinion(s) and prior administrative medical findings, is inconsistent, we will consider the relevant evidence and see if we can determine whether you are disabled based on the evidence we have.

(2) If the evidence is consistent but we have insufficient evidence to determine whether you are disabled, or if after considering the evidence we determine we cannot reach a conclusion about whether you are disabled, we will determine the best way to resolve the inconsistency or insufficiency. The action(s) we take will depend on the nature of the inconsistency or insufficiency. We will try to resolve the inconsistency or insufficiency by taking any one or more of the actions listed in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (b)(2)(iv) of this section. We might not take all of the actions listed below. We will consider any additional evidence we receive together with the evidence we already have.

(i) We may recontact your medical source. We may choose not to seek additional evidence or clarification from a medical source if we know from experience that the source either cannot or will not provide the necessary evidence. If we obtain medical evidence over the telephone, we will send the telephone report to the source for review, signature, and return;

(ii) We may request additional existing evidence;

(iii) We may ask you to undergo a consultative examination at our expense (see §§ 416.917 through 416.919t); or

(iv) We may ask you or others for more information.

(3) When there are inconsistencies in the evidence that we cannot resolve or when, despite efforts to obtain additional evidence, the evidence is insufficient to determine whether you are disabled, we will make a determination or decision based on the evidence we have.

(c) Evidence that is inherently neither valuable nor persuasive. Paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(3) apply in claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017. Because the evidence listed in paragraphs ((c)(1)-(c)(3) of this section is inherently neither valuable nor persuasive to the issue of whether you are disabled or blind under the Act, we will not provide any analysis about how we considered such evidence in our determination or decision, even under § 416.920c:

(1) Decisions by other governmental agencies and nongovernmental entities. See § 416.904.

(2) Disability examiner findings. Findings made by a State agency disability examiner made at a previous level of adjudication about a medical issue, vocational issue, or the ultimate determination about whether you are disabled.

(3) Statements on issues reserved to the Commissioner. The statements listed in paragraphs (c)(3)(i) through (c)(3)(ix) of this section would direct our determination or decision that you are or are not disabled or blind within the meaning of the Act, but we are responsible for making the determination or decision about whether you are disabled or blind:

(i) Statements that you are or are not disabled, blind, able to work, or able to perform regular or continuing work;

(ii) Statements about whether or not you have a severe impairment(s);

(iii) Statements about whether or not your impairment(s) meets the duration requirement (see § 416.909);

(iv) Statements about whether or not your impairment(s) meets or medically equals any listing in the Listing of Impairments in Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 1;

(v) If you are a child, statements about whether or not your impairment(s) functionally equals the listings in Part 404 Subpart P Appendix 1 (see § 416.926a);

(vi) If you are an adult, statements about what your residual functional capacity is using our programmatic terms about the functional exertional levels in Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 2, Rule 200.00 instead of descriptions about your functional abilities and limitations (see § 416.945);

(vii) If you are an adult, statements about whether or not your residual functional capacity prevents you from doing past relevant work (see § 416.960);

(viii) If you are an adult, statements that you do or do not meet the requirements of a medical-vocational rule in Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 2; and

(ix) Statements about whether or not your disability continues or ends when we conduct a continuing disability review (see § 416.994).

[82 FR 5877, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.920c How we consider and articulate medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings for claims filed on or after March 27, 2017.

For claims filed (see § 416.325) on or after March 27, 2017, the rules in this section apply. For claims filed before March 27, 2017, the rules in § 416.927 apply.

(a) How we consider medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings. We will not defer or give any specific evidentiary weight, including controlling weight, to any medical opinion(s) or prior administrative medical finding(s), including those from your medical sources. When a medical source provides one or more medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings, we will consider those medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings from that medical source together using the factors listed in paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(5) of this section, as appropriate. The most important factors we consider when we evaluate the persuasiveness of medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings are supportability (paragraph (c)(1) of this section) and consistency (paragraph (c)(2) of this section). We will articulate how we considered the medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings in your claim according to paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) How we articulate our consideration of medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings. We will articulate in our determination or decision how persuasive we find all of the medical opinions and all of the prior administrative medical findings in your case record. Our articulation requirements are as follows:

(1) Source-level articulation. Because many claims have voluminous case records containing many types of evidence from different sources, it is not administratively feasible for us to articulate in each determination or decision how we considered all of the factors for all of the medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings in your case record. Instead, when a medical source provides multiple medical opinion(s) or prior administrative medical finding(s), we will articulate how we considered the medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings from that medical source together in a single analysis using the factors listed in paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(5) of this section, as appropriate. We are not required to articulate how we considered each medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding from one medical source individually.

(2) Most important factors. The factors of supportability (paragraph (c)(1) of this section) and consistency (paragraph (c)(2) of this section) are the most important factors we consider when we determine how persuasive we find a medical source's medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings to be. Therefore, we will explain how we considered the supportability and consistency factors for a medical source's medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings in your determination or decision. We may, but are not required to, explain how we considered the factors in paragraphs (c)(3) through (c)(5) of this section, as appropriate, when we articulate how we consider medical opinions and prior administrative medical findings in your case record.

(3) Equally persuasive medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings about the same issue. When we find that two or more medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings about the same issue are both equally well-supported (paragraph (c)(1) of this section) and consistent with the record (paragraph (c)(2) of this section) but are not exactly the same, we will articulate how we considered the other most persuasive factors in paragraphs (c)(3) through (c)(5) of this section for those medical opinions or prior administrative medical findings in your determination or decision.

(c) Factors. We will consider the following factors when we consider the medical opinion(s) and prior administrative medical finding(s) in your case:

(1) Supportability. The more relevant the objective medical evidence and supporting explanations presented by a medical source are to support his or her medical opinion(s) or prior administrative medical finding(s), the more persuasive the medical opinions or prior administrative medical finding(s) will be.

(2) Consistency. The more consistent a medical opinion(s) or prior administrative medical finding(s) is with the evidence from other medical sources and nonmedical sources in the claim, the more persuasive the medical opinion(s) or prior administrative medical finding(s) will be.

(3) Relationship with the claimant. This factor combines consideration of the issues in paragraphs (c)(3)(i)-(v) of this section.

(i) Length of the treatment relationship. The length of time a medical source has treated you may help demonstrate whether the medical source has a longitudinal understanding of your impairment(s).

(ii) Frequency of examinations. The frequency of your visits with the medical source may help demonstrate whether the medical source has a longitudinal understanding of your impairment(s).

(iii) Purpose of the treatment relationship. The purpose for treatment you received from the medical source may help demonstrate the level of knowledge the medical source has of your impairment(s).

(iv) Extent of the treatment relationship. The kinds and extent of examinations and testing the medical source has performed or ordered from specialists or independent laboratories may help demonstrate the level of knowledge the medical source has of your impairment(s).

(v) Examining relationship. A medical source may have a better understanding of your impairment(s) if he or she examines you than if the medical source only reviews evidence in your folder.

(4) Specialization. The medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding of a medical source who has received advanced education and training to become a specialist may be more persuasive about medical issues related to his or her area of specialty than the medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding of a medical source who is not a specialist in the relevant area of specialty.

(5) Other factors. We will consider other factors that tend to support or contradict a medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding. This includes, but is not limited to, evidence showing a medical source has familiarity with the other evidence in the claim or an understanding of our disability program's policies and evidentiary requirements. When we consider a medical source's familiarity with the other evidence in a claim, we will also consider whether new evidence we receive after the medical source made his or her medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding makes the medical opinion or prior administrative medical finding more or less persuasive.

(d) Evidence from nonmedical sources. We are not required to articulate how we considered evidence from nonmedical sources using the requirements in paragraphs (a) through (c) in this section.

[82 FR 5878, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.921 Establishing that you have a medically determinable impairment(s).

If you are not doing substantial gainful activity, we will then determine whether you have a medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) (see § 416.920(a)(4)(ii)). Your impairment(s) must result from anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities that can be shown by medically acceptable clinical and laboratory diagnostic techniques. Therefore, a physical or mental impairment must be established by objective medical evidence from an acceptable medical source. We will not use your statement of symptoms, a diagnosis, or a medical opinion to establish the existence of an impairment(s). After we establish that you have a medically determinable impairment(s), then we determine whether your impairment(s) is severe.

[82 FR 5879, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.922 What we mean by an impairment(s) that is not severe in an adult.

(a) Non-severe impairment(s). An impairment or combination of impairments is not severe if it does not significantly limit your physical or mental ability to do basic work activities.

(b) Basic work activities. When we talk about basic work activities, we mean the abilities and aptitudes necessary to do most jobs. Examples of these include -

(1) Physical functions such as walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying, or handling;

(2) Capacities for seeing, hearing, and speaking;

(3) Understanding, carrying out, and remembering simple instructions;

(4) Use of judgment;

(5) Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations; and

(6) Dealing with changes in a routine work setting.

[82 FR 5879, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.923 Multiple impairments.

(a) Unrelated severe impairments. We cannot combine two or more unrelated severe impairments to meet the 12-month duration test. If you have a severe impairment(s) and then develop another unrelated severe impairment(s) but neither one is expected to last for 12 months, we cannot find you disabled, even though the two impairments in combination last for 12 months.

(b) Concurrent impairments. If you have two or more concurrent impairments that, when considered in combination, are severe, we must determine whether the combined effect of your impairments can be expected to continue to be severe for 12 months. If one or more of your impairments improves or is expected to improve within 12 months, so that the combined effect of your remaining impairments is no longer severe, we will find that you do not meet the 12-month duration test.

(c) Combined effect. In determining whether your physical or mental impairment or impairments are of a sufficient medical severity that such impairment or impairments could be the basis of eligibility under the law, we will consider the combined effect of all of your impairments without regard to whether any such impairment, if considered separately, would be of sufficient severity. If we do find a medically severe combination of impairments, we will consider the combined impact of the impairments throughout the disability determination process. If we do not find that you have a medically severe combination of impairments, we will determine that you are not disabled (see §§ 416.920 and 416.924).

[82 FR 5879, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.924 How we determine disability for children.

(a) Steps in evaluating disability. We consider all relevant evidence in your case record when we make a determination or decision whether you are disabled. If you allege more than one impairment, we will evaluate all the impairments for which we have evidence. Thus, we will consider the combined effects of all your impairments upon your overall health and functioning. We will also evaluate any limitations in your functioning that result from your symptoms, including pain (see § 416.929). We will also consider all of the relevant factors in §§ 416.924a and 416.924b whenever we assess your functioning at any step of this process. We follow a set order to determine whether you are disabled. If you are doing substantial gainful activity, we will determine that you are not disabled and not review your claim further. If you are not doing substantial gainful activity, we will consider your physical or mental impairment(s) first to see if you have an impairment or combination of impairments that is severe. If your impairment(s) is not severe, we will determine that you are not disabled and not review your claim further. If your impairment(s) is severe, we will review your claim further to see if you have an impairment(s) that meets, medically equals, or functionally equals the listings. If you have such an impairment(s), and it meets the duration requirement, we will find that you are disabled. If you do not have such an impairment(s), or if it does not meet the duration requirement, we will find that you are not disabled.

(b) If you are working. If you are working and the work you are doing is substantial gainful activity, we will find that you are not disabled regardless of your medical condition or age, education, or work experience. (For our rules on how we decide whether you are engaging in substantial gainful activity, see §§ 416.971 through 416.976.)

(c) You must have a medically determinable impairment(s) that is severe. If you do not have a medically determinable impairment, or your impairment(s) is a slight abnormality or a combination of slight abnormalities that causes no more than minimal functional limitations, we will find that you do not have a severe impairment(s) and are, therefore, not disabled.

(d) Your impairment(s) must meet, medically equal, or functionally equal the listings. An impairment(s) causes marked and severe functional limitations if it meets or medically equals the severity of a set of criteria for an impairment in the listings, or if it functionally equals the listings.

(1) Therefore, if you have an impairment(s) that meets or medically equals the requirements of a listing or that functionally equals the listings, and that meets the duration requirement, we will find you disabled.

(2) If your impairment(s) does not meet the duration requirement, or does not meet, medically equal, or functionally equal the listings, we will find that you are not disabled.

(e) Other rules. We explain other rules for evaluating impairments at all steps of this process in §§ 416.924a, 416.924b, and 416.929. We explain our rules for deciding whether an impairment(s) meets a listing in § 416.925. Our rules for how we decide whether an impairment(s) medically equals a listing are in § 416.926. Our rules for deciding whether an impairment(s) functionally equals the listings are in § 416.926a.

(f) If you attain age 18 after you file your disability application but before we make a determination or decision. For the period during which you are under age 18, we will use the rules in this section. For the period starting with the day you attain age 18, we will use the disability rules we use for adults who file new claims, in § 416.920.

(g) How we will explain our findings. When we make a determination or decision whether you are disabled under this section or whether your disability continues under § 416.994a, we will indicate our findings at each step of the sequential evaluation process as we explain in this paragraph. At the initial and reconsideration levels of the administrative review process, State agency medical and psychological consultants will indicate their findings in writing in a manner that we prescribe. The State agency medical or psychological consultant (see § 416.1016) or other designee of the Commissioner has overall responsibility for completing the prescribed writing and must sign the prescribed writing to attest that it is complete, including the findings of fact and any discussion of supporting evidence. Disability hearing officers, administrative law judges and the administrative appeals judges on the Appeals Council (when the Appeals Council makes a decision) will indicate their findings at each step of the sequential evaluation process in their determinations or decisions. In claims adjudicated under the procedures in part 405 of this chapter, administrative law judges will also indicate their findings at each step of the sequential evaluation process in their decisions.

[58 FR 47577, Sept. 9, 1993, as amended at 62 FR 6421, Feb. 11, 1997; 65 FR 54778, Sept. 11, 2000; 71 FR 16460, Mar. 31, 2006; 76 FR 24811, May 3, 2011; 76 FR 41687, July 15, 2011]

§ 416.924a Considerations in determining disability for children.

(a) Basic considerations. We consider all evidence in your case record (see § 416.913). The evidence in your case record may include information from medical sources (such as your pediatrician or other physician; psychologist; qualified speech-language pathologist; and physical, occupational, and rehabilitation therapists) and nonmedical sources (such as your parents, teachers, and other people who know you).

(1) Medical evidence -

(i) General. Medical evidence of your impairment(s) must describe symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. The medical evidence may include, but is not limited to, formal testing that provides information about your development or functioning in terms of standard deviations, percentiles, percentages of delay, or age or grade equivalents. It may also include opinions from medical sources about the nature and severity of your impairments. (See § 416.920c.)

(ii) Test scores. We consider all of the relevant information in your case record and will not consider any single piece of evidence in isolation. Therefore, we will not rely on test scores alone when we decide whether you are disabled. (See § 416.926a(e) for more information about how we consider test scores.)

(iii) Medical sources. Medical sources will report their findings and observations on clinical examination and the results of any formal testing. A medical source's report should note and resolve any material inconsistencies between formal test results, other medical findings, and your usual functioning. Whenever possible and appropriate, the interpretation of findings by the medical source should reflect consideration of information from your parents or other people who know you, including your teachers and therapists. When a medical source has accepted and relied on such information to reach a diagnosis, we may consider this information to be a sign, as defined in § 416.902(l).

(2) Statements from nonmedical sources. Every child is unique, so the effects of your impairment(s) on your functioning may be very different from the effects the same impairment(s) might have on another child. Therefore, whenever possible and appropriate, we will try to get information from people who can tell us about the effects of your impairment(s) on your activities and how you function on a day-to-day basis. These other people may include, but are not limited to:

(i) Your parents and other caregivers. Your parents and other caregivers can be important sources of information because they usually see you every day. In addition to your parents, other caregivers may include a childcare provider who takes care of you while your parent(s) works or an adult who looks after you in a before-or after-school program.

(ii) Early intervention and preschool programs. If you have been identified for early intervention services (in your home or elsewhere) because of your impairment(s), or if you attend a preschool program (e.g., Headstart or a public school kindergarten for children with special needs), these programs are also important sources of information about your functioning. We will ask for reports from the agency and individuals who provide you with services or from your teachers about how you typically function compared to other children your age who do not have impairments.

(iii) School. If you go to school, we will ask for information from your teachers and other school personnel about how you are functioning there on a day-to-day basis compared to other children your age who do not have impairments. We will ask for any reports that the school may have that show the results of formal testing or that describe any special education instruction or services, including home-based instruction, or any accommodations provided in a regular classroom.

(b) Factors we consider when we evaluate the effects of your impairment(s) on your functioning -

(1) General. We must consider your functioning when we decide whether your impairment(s) is “severe” and when we decide whether your impairment(s) functionally equals the listings. We will also consider your functioning when we decide whether your impairment(s) meets or medically equals a listing if the listing we are considering includes functioning among its criteria.

(2) Factors we consider when we evaluate your functioning. Your limitations in functioning must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). The information we get from your medical and nonmedical sources can help us understand how your impairment(s) affects your functioning. We will also consider any factors that are relevant to how you function when we evaluate your impairment or combination of impairments. For example, your symptoms (such as pain, fatigue, decreased energy, or anxiety) may limit your functioning. (See § 416.929.) We explain some other factors we may consider when we evaluate your functioning in paragraphs (b)(3)-(b)(9) of this section.

(3) How your functioning compares to the functioning of children your age who do not have impairments -

(i) General. When we evaluate your functioning, we will look at whether you do the things that other children your age typically do or whether you have limitations and restrictions because of your medically determinable impairment(s). We will also look at how well you do the activities and how much help you need from your family, teachers, or others. Information about what you can and cannot do, and how you function on a day-to-day basis at home, school, and in the community, allows us to compare your activities to the activities of children your age who do not have impairments.

(ii) How we will consider reports of your functioning. When we consider the evidence in your case record about the quality of your activities, we will consider the standards used by the person who gave us the information. We will also consider the characteristics of the group to whom you are being compared. For example, if the way you do your classwork is compared to other children in a special education class, we will consider that you are being compared to children who do have impairments.

(4) Combined effects of multiple impairments. If you have more than one impairment, we will sometimes be able to decide that you have a “severe” impairment or an impairment that meets, medically equals, or functionally equals the listings by looking at each of your impairments separately. When we cannot, we will look comprehensively at the combined effects of your impairments on your day-to-day functioning instead of considering the limitations resulting from each impairment separately. (See §§ 416.923 and 416.926a(c) for more information about how we will consider the interactive and cumulative effects of your impairments on your functioning.)

(5) How well you can initiate, sustain, and complete your activities, including the amount of help or adaptations you need, and the effects of structured or supportive settings -

(i) Initiating, sustaining, and completing activities. We will consider how effectively you function by examining how independently you are able to initiate, sustain, and complete your activities despite your impairment(s), compared to other children your age who do not have impairments. We will consider:

(A) The range of activities you do;

(B) Your ability to do them independently, including any prompting you may need to begin, carry through, and complete your activities;

(C) The pace at which you do your activities;

(D) How much effort you need to make to do your activities; and

(E) How long you are able to sustain your activities.

(ii) Extra help. We will consider how independently you are able to function compared to other children your age who do not have impairments. We will consider whether you need help from other people, or whether you need special equipment, devices, or medications to perform your day-to-day activities. For example, we may consider how much supervision you need to keep from hurting yourself, how much help you need every day to get dressed or, if you are an infant, how long it takes for your parents or other caregivers to feed you. We recognize that children are often able to do things and complete tasks when given help, but may not be able to do these same things by themselves. Therefore, we will consider how much extra help you need, what special equipment or devices you use, and the medications you take that enable you to participate in activities like other children your age who do not have impairments.

(iii) Adaptations. We will consider the nature and extent of any adaptations that you use to enable you to function. Such adaptations may include assistive devices or appliances. Some adaptations may enable you to function normally or almost normally (e.g., eyeglasses). Others may increase your functioning, even though you may still have functional limitations (e.g., ankle-foot orthoses, hand or foot splints, and specially adapted or custom-made tools, utensils, or devices for self-care activities such as bathing, feeding, toileting, and dressing). When we evaluate your functioning with an adaptation, we will consider the degree to which the adaptation enables you to function compared to other children your age who do not have impairments, your ability to use the adaptation effectively on a sustained basis, and any functional limitations that nevertheless persist.

(iv) Structured or supportive settings.

(A) If you have a serious impairment(s), you may spend some or all of your time in a structured or supportive setting, beyond what a child who does not have an impairment typically needs.

(B) A structured or supportive setting may be your own home in which family members or other people (e.g., visiting nurses or home health workers) make adjustments to accommodate your impairment(s). A structured or supportive setting may also be your classroom at school, whether it is a regular classroom in which you are accommodated or a special classroom. It may also be a residential facility or school where you live for a period of time.

(C) A structured or supportive setting may minimize signs and symptoms of your impairment(s) and help to improve your functioning while you are in it, but your signs, symptoms, and functional limitations may worsen outside this type of setting. Therefore, we will consider your need for a structured setting and the degree of limitation in functioning you have or would have outside the structured setting. Even if you are able to function adequately in the structured or supportive setting, we must consider how you function in other settings and whether you would continue to function at an adequate level without the structured or supportive setting.

(D) If you have a chronic impairment(s), you may have your activities structured in such a way as to minimize stress and reduce the symptoms or signs of your impairment(s). You may continue to have persistent pain, fatigue, decreased energy, or other symptoms or signs, although at a lesser level of severity. We will consider whether you are more limited in your functioning than your symptoms and signs would indicate.

(E) Therefore, if your symptoms or signs are controlled or reduced in a structured setting, we will consider how well you are functioning in the setting and the nature of the setting in which you are functioning (e.g., home or a special class); the amount of help you need from your parents, teachers, or others to function as well as you do; adjustments you make to structure your environment; and how you would function without the structured or supportive setting.

(6) Unusual settings. Children may function differently in unfamiliar or one-to-one settings than they do in their usual settings at home, at school, in childcare or in the community. You may appear more or less impaired on a single examination (such as a consultative examination) than indicated by the information covering a longer period. Therefore, we will apply the guidance in paragraph (b)(5) of this section when we consider how you function in an unusual or one-to-one situation. We will look at your performance in a special situation and at your typical day-to-day functioning in routine situations. We will not draw inferences about your functioning in other situations based only on how you function in a one-to-one, new, or unusual situation.

(7) Early intervention and school programs -

(i) General. If you are a very young child who has been identified for early intervention services, or if you attend school (including preschool), the records of people who know you or who have examined you are important sources of information about your impairment(s) and its effects on your functioning. Records from physicians, teachers and school psychologists, or physical, occupational, or speech-language therapists are examples of what we will consider. If you receive early intervention services or go to school or preschool, we will consider this information when it is relevant and available to us.

(ii) School evidence. If you go to school or preschool, we will ask your teacher(s) about your performance in your activities throughout your school day. We will consider all the evidence we receive from your school, including teacher questionnaires, teacher checklists, group achievement testing, and report cards.

(iii) Early intervention and special education programs. If you have received a comprehensive assessment for early intervention services or special education services, we will consider information used by the assessment team to make its recommendations. We will consider the information in your Individualized Family Service Plan, your Individualized Education Program, or your plan for transition services to help us understand your functioning. We will examine the goals and objectives of your plan or program as further indicators of your functioning, as well as statements regarding related services, supplementary aids, program modifications, and other accommodations recommended to help you function, together with the other relevant information in your case record.

(iv) Special education or accommodations. We will consider the fact that you attend school, that you may be placed in a special education setting, or that you receive accommodations because of your impairments along with the other information in your case record. The fact that you attend school does not mean that you are not disabled. The fact that you do or do not receive special education services does not, in itself, establish your actual limitations or abilities. Children are placed in special education settings, or are included in regular classrooms (with or without accommodation), for many reasons that may or may not be related to the level of their impairments. For example, you may receive one-to-one assistance from an aide throughout the day in a regular classroom, or be placed in a special classroom. We will consider the circumstances of your school attendance, such as your ability to function in a regular classroom or preschool setting with children your age who do not have impairments. Similarly, we will consider that good performance in a special education setting does not mean that you are functioning at the same level as other children your age who do not have impairments.

(v) Attendance and participation. We will also consider factors affecting your ability to participate in your education program. You may be unable to participate on a regular basis because of the chronic or episodic nature of your impairment(s) or your need for therapy or treatment. If you have more than one impairment, we will look at whether the effects of your impairments taken together make you unable to participate on a regular basis. We will consider how your temporary removal or absence from the program affects your ability to function compared to other children your age who do not have impairments.

(8) The impact of chronic illness and limitations that interfere with your activities over time. If you have a chronic impairment(s) that is characterized by episodes of exacerbation (worsening) and remission (improvement), we will consider the frequency and severity of your episodes of exacerbation as factors that may be limiting your functioning. Your level of functioning may vary considerably over time. Proper evaluation of your ability to function in any domain requires us to take into account any variations in your level of functioning to determine the impact of your chronic illness on your ability to function over time. If you require frequent treatment, we will consider it as explained in paragraph (b)(9)(ii) of this section.

(9) The effects of treatment (including medications and other treatment). We will evaluate the effects of your treatment to determine its effect on your functioning in your particular case.

(i) Effects of medications. We will consider the effects of medication on your symptoms, signs, laboratory findings, and functioning. Although medications may control the most obvious manifestations of your impairment(s), they may or may not affect the functional limitations imposed by your impairment(s). If your symptoms or signs are reduced by medications, we will consider:

(A) Any of your functional limitations that may nevertheless persist, even if there is improvement from the medications;

(B) Whether your medications create any side effects that cause or contribute to your functional limitations;

(C) The frequency of your need for medication;

(D) Changes in your medication or the way your medication is prescribed; and

(E) Any evidence over time of how medication helps or does not help you to function compared to other children your age who do not have impairments.

(ii) Other treatment. We will also consider the level and frequency of treatment other than medications that you get for your impairment(s). You may need frequent and ongoing therapy from one or more medical sources to maintain or improve your functional status. (Examples of therapy include occupational, physical, or speech and language therapy, nursing or home health services, psychotherapy, or psychosocial counseling.) Frequent therapy, although intended to improve your functioning in some ways, may also interfere with your functioning in other ways. Therefore, we will consider the frequency of any therapy you must have, and how long you have received or will need it. We will also consider whether the therapy interferes with your participation in activities typical of other children your age who do not have impairments, such as attending school or classes and socializing with your peers. If you must frequently interrupt your activities at school or at home for therapy, we will consider whether these interruptions interfere with your functioning. We will also consider the length and frequency of your hospitalizations.

(iii) Treatment and intervention, in general. With treatment or intervention, you may not only have your symptoms or signs reduced, but may also maintain, return to, or achieve a level of functioning that is not disabling. Treatment or intervention may prevent, eliminate, or reduce functional limitations.

[65 FR 54779, Sept. 11, 2000, as amended at 82 FR 5879, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.924b Age as a factor of evaluation in the sequential evaluation process for children.

(a) General. In this section, we explain how we consider age when we decide whether you are disabled. Your age may or may not be a factor in our determination whether your impairment(s) meets or medically equals a listing, depending on the listing we use for comparison. However, your age is an important factor when we decide whether your impairment(s) is severe (see § 416.924(c)) and whether it functionally equals the listings (see § 416.926a). Except in the case of certain premature infants, as described in paragraph (b) of this section, age means chronological age.

(1) When we determine whether you have an impairment or combination of impairments that is severe, we will compare your functioning to that of children your age who do not have impairments.

(2) When we determine whether your impairment(s) meets a listing, we may or may not need to consider your age. The listings describe impairments that we consider of such significance that they are presumed to cause marked and severe functional limitations.

(i) If the listing appropriate for evaluating your impairment is divided into specific age categories, we will evaluate your impairment according to your age when we decide whether your impairment meets that listing.

(ii) If the listing appropriate for evaluating your impairment does not include specific age categories, we will decide whether your impairment meets the listing without giving consideration to your age.

(3) When we compare an unlisted impairment or a combination of impairments with the listings to determine whether it medically equals the severity of a listing, the way we consider your age will depend on the listing we use for comparison. We will use the same principles for considering your age as in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (a)(2)(ii) of this section; that is, we will consider your age only if we are comparing your impairment(s) to a listing that includes specific age categories.

(4) We will also consider your age and whether it affects your ability to be tested. If your impairment(s) is not amenable to formal testing because of your age, we will consider all information in your case record that helps us decide whether you are disabled. We will consider other generally acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice that will help us evaluate the existence and severity of your impairment(s).

(b) Correcting chronological age of premature infants. We generally use chronological age (a child's age based on birth date) when we decide whether, or the extent to which, a physical or mental impairment or combination of impairments causes functional limitations. However, if you were born prematurely, we may consider you younger than your chronological age when we evaluate your development. We may use a “corrected” chronological age (CCA); that is, your chronological age adjusted by a period of gestational prematurity. We consider an infant born at less than 37 weeks' gestation to be born prematurely.

(1) We compute your CCA by subtracting the number of weeks of prematurity (the difference between 40 weeks of full-term gestation and the number of actual weeks of gestation) from your chronological age. For example, if your chronological age is 20 weeks but you were born at 32 weeks gestation (8 weeks premature), then your CCA is 12 weeks.

(2) We evaluate developmental delay in a premature child until the child's prematurity is no longer a relevant factor, generally no later than about chronological age 2.

(i) If you have not attained age 1 and were born prematurely, we will assess your development using your CCA.

(ii) If you are over age 1 and have a developmental delay, and prematurity is still a relevant factor, we will decide whether to correct your chronological age. We will base our decision on our judgment and all the facts in your case. If we decide to correct your chronological age, we may correct it by subtracting the full number of weeks of prematurity or a lesser number of weeks. If your developmental delay is the result of your medically determinable impairment(s) and is not attributable to your prematurity, we will decide not to correct your chronological age.

(3) Notwithstanding the provisions in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, we will not compute a corrected chronological age if the medical evidence shows that your medical source has already considered your prematurity in his or her assessment of your development. We will not compute a CCA when we find you disabled under listing 100.04 of the Listing of Impairments.

[65 FR 54778, Sept. 11, 2000, as amended at 72 FR 59431, Oct. 19, 2007; 80 FR 19529, Apr. 13, 2015; 82 FR 5880, Jan. 18, 2017]

Medical Considerations
§ 416.925 Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

(a) What is the purpose of the Listing of Impairments? The Listing of Impairments (the listings) is in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. For adults, it describes for each of the major body systems impairments that we consider to be severe enough to prevent an individual from doing any gainful activity, regardless of his or her age, education, or work experience. For children, it describes impairments that cause marked and severe functional limitations.

(b) How is appendix 1 organized? There are two parts in appendix 1:

(1) Part A contains criteria that apply to individuals age 18 and over. We may also use part A for individuals who are under age 18 if the disease processes have a similar effect on adults and children.

(2)

(i) Part B contains criteria that apply only to individuals who are under age 18; we never use the listings in part B to evaluate individuals who are age 18 or older. In evaluating disability for a person under age 18, we use part B first. If the criteria in part B do not apply, we may use the criteria in part A when those criteria give appropriate consideration to the effects of the impairment(s) in children. To the extent possible, we number the provisions in part B to maintain a relationship with their counterparts in part A.

(ii) Although the severity criteria in part B of the listings are expressed in different ways for different impairments, “listing-level severity” generally means the level of severity described in § 416.926a(a); that is, “marked” limitations in two domains of functioning or an “extreme” limitation in one domain. (See § 416.926a(e) for the definitions of the terms marked and extreme as they apply to children.) Therefore, in general, a child's impairment(s) is of “listing-level severity” if it causes marked limitations in two domains of functioning or an extreme limitation in one. However, when we decide whether your impairment(s) meets the requirements of a listing, we will decide that your impairment is of “listing-level severity” even if it does not result in marked limitations in two domains of functioning, or an extreme limitation in one, if the listing that we apply does not require such limitations to establish that an impairment(s) is disabling.

(c) How do we use the listings?

(1) Most body system sections in parts A and B of appendix 1 are in two parts: an introduction, followed by the specific listings.

(2) The introduction to each body system contains information relevant to the use of the listings in that body system; for example, examples of common impairments in the body system and definitions used in the listings for that body system. We may also include specific criteria for establishing a diagnosis, confirming the existence of an impairment, or establishing that your impairment(s) satisfies the criteria of a particular listing in the body system. Even if we do not include specific criteria for establishing a diagnosis or confirming the existence of your impairment, you must still show that you have a severe medically determinable impairment(s), as defined in §§ 416.921 and 416.924(c).

(3) In most cases, the specific listings follow the introduction in each body system, after the heading, Category of Impairments. Within each listing, we specify the objective medical and other findings needed to satisfy the criteria of that listing. We will find that your impairment(s) meets the requirements of a listing when it satisfies all of the criteria of that listing, including any relevant criteria in the introduction, and meets the duration requirement (see § 416.909).

(4) Most of the listed impairments are permanent or expected to result in death. For some listings, we state a specific period of time for which your impairment(s) will meet the listing. For all others, the evidence must show that your impairment(s) has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of at least 12 months.

(5) If your impairment(s) does not meet the criteria of a listing, it can medically equal the criteria of a listing. We explain our rules for medical equivalence in § 416.926. We use the listings only to find that you are disabled or still disabled. If your impairment(s) does not meet or medically equal the criteria of a listing, we may find that you are disabled or still disabled at a later step in the sequential evaluation process.

(d) Can your impairment(s) meet a listing based only on a diagnosis? No. Your impairment(s) cannot meet the criteria of a listing based only on a diagnosis. To meet the requirements of a listing, you must have a medically determinable impairment(s) that satisfies all of the criteria of the listing.

(e) How do we consider your symptoms when we determine whether your impairment(s) meets a listing? Some listed impairments include symptoms, such as pain, as criteria. Section 416.929(d)(2) explains how we consider your symptoms when your symptoms are included as criteria in a listing.

[71 FR 10430, Mar. 1, 2006, as amended at 76 FR 19698, Apr. 8, 2011; 82 FR 5880, Jan. 18, 2017]

§ 416.926 Medical equivalence for adults and children.

(a) What is medical equivalence? Your impairment(s) is medically equivalent to a listed impairment in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter if it is at least equal in severity and duration to the criteria of any listed impairment.

(b) How do we determine medical equivalence? We can find medical equivalence in three ways.

(1)

(i) If you have an impairment that is described in the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter, but -

(A) You do not exhibit one or more of the findings specified in the particular listing, or

(B) You exhibit all of the findings, but one or more of the findings is not as severe as specified in the particular listing,

(ii) We will find that your impairment is medically equivalent to that listing if you have other findings related to your impairment that are at least of equal medical significance to the required criteria.

(2) If you have an impairment(s) that is not described in the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter, we will compare your findings with those for closely analogous listed impairments. If the findings related to your impairment(s) are at least of equal medical significance to those of a listed impairment, we will find that your impairment(s) is medically equivalent to the analogous listing.

(3) If you have a combination of impairments, no one of which meets a listing described in the Listing of Impairments in appendix 1 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter (see § 416.925(c)(3)), we will compare your findings with those for closely analogous listed impairments. If the findings related to your impairments are at least of equal medical significance to those of a listed impairment, we will find that your combination of impairments is medically equivalent to that listing.

(4) Section 416.929(d)(3) explains how we consider your symptoms, such as pain, when we make findings about medical equivalence.

(c) What evidence do we consider when we determine if your impairment(s) medically equals a listing? When we determine if your impairment medically equals a listing, we consider all evidence in your case record about your impairment(s) and its effects on you that is relevant to this finding. We do not consider your vocational factors of age, education, and work experience (see, for example, § 416.960(c)(1)). We also consider the opinion given by one or more medical or psychological consultants designated by the Commissioner. (See § 416.1016.)

(d) Who is a designated medical or psychological consultant? A medical or psychological consultant designated by the Commissioner includes any medical or psychological consultant employed or engaged to make medical judgments by the Social Security Administration, the Railroad Retirement Board, or a State agency authorized to make disability determinations. See § 416.1016 for the necessary qualifications for medical consultants and psychological consultants.

(e) Who is responsible for determining medical equivalence?

(1) In cases where the State agency or other designee of the Commissioner makes the initial or reconsideration disability determination, a State agency medical or psychological consultant or other designee of the Commissioner (see § 416.1016 of this part) has the overall responsibility for determining medical equivalence.

(2) For cases in the disability hearing process or otherwise decided by a disability hearing officer, the responsibility for determining medical equivalence rests with either the disability hearing officer or, if the disability hearing officer's reconsideration determination is changed under § 416.1418 of this part, with the Associate Commissioner for Disability Policy or his or her delegate.

(3) For cases at the administrative law judge or Appeals Council level, the responsibility for deciding medical equivalence rests with the administrative law judge or Appeals Council.

[45 FR 55621, Aug. 20, 1980, as amended at 52 FR 33928, Sept. 9, 1987; 56 FR 5561, Feb. 11, 1991; 62 FR 6424, Feb. 11, 1997; 62 FR 13538, Mar. 21, 1997; 65 FR 34959, June 1, 2000; 71 FR 10431, Mar. 1, 2006; 71 FR 16460, Mar. 31, 2006; 76 FR 24811, May 3, 2011; 82 FR 5880, Jan. 18, 2017; 82 FR 15132, Mar. 27, 2017]

§ 416.926a Functional equivalence for children.

(a) General. If you have a severe impairment or combination of impairments that does not meet or medically equal any listing, we will decide whether it results in limitations that functionally equal the listings. By “functionally equal the listings,” we mean that your impairment(s) must be of listing-level severity; i.e., it must result in “marked” limitations in two domains of functioning or an “extreme” limitation in one domain, as explained in this section. We will assess the functional limitations caused by your impairment(s); i.e., what you cannot do, have difficulty doing, need help doing, or are restricted from doing because of your impairment(s). When we make a finding regarding functional equivalence, we will assess the interactive and cumulative effects of all of the impairments for which we have evidence, including any impairments you have that are not “severe.” (See § 416.924(c).) When we assess your functional limitations, we will consider all the relevant factors in §§ 416.924a, 416.924b, and 416.929 including, but not limited to:

(1) How well you can initiate and sustain activities, how much extra help you need, and the effects of structured or supportive settings (see § 416.924a(b)(5));

(2) How you function in school (see § 416.924a(b)(7)); and

(3) The effects of your medications or other treatment (see § 416.924a(b)(9)).

(b) How we will consider your functioning. We will look at the information we have in your case record about how your functioning is affected during all of your activities when we decide whether your impairment or combination of impairments functionally equals the listings. Your activities are everything you do at home, at school, and in your community. We will look at how appropriately, effectively, and independently you perform your activities compared to the performance of other children your age who do not have impairments.

(1) We will consider how you function in your activities in terms of six domains. These domains are broad areas of functioning intended to capture all of what a child can or cannot do. In paragraphs (g) through (l), we describe each domain in general terms. For most of the domains, we also provide examples of activities that illustrate the typical functioning of children in different age groups. For all of the domains, we also provide examples of limitations within the domains. However, we recognize that there is a range of development and functioning, and that not all children within an age category are expected to be able to do all of the activities in the examples of typical functioning. We also recognize that limitations of any of the activities in the examples do not necessarily mean that a child has a “marked” or “extreme” limitation, as defined in paragraph (e) of this section. The domains we use are:

(i) Acquiring and using information;

(ii) Attending and completing tasks;

(iii) Interacting and relating with others;

(iv) Moving about and manipulating objects;

(v) Caring for yourself; and,

(vi) Health and physical well-being.

(2) When we evaluate your ability to function in each domain, we will ask for and consider information that will help us answer the following questions about whether your impairment(s) affects your functioning and whether your activities are typical of other children your age who do not have impairments.

(i) What activities are you able to perform?

(ii) What activities are you not able to perform?

(iii) Which of your activities are limited or restricted compared to other children your age who do not have impairments?

(iv) Where do you have difficulty with your activities-at home, in childcare, at school, or in the community?

(v) Do you have difficulty independently initiating, sustaining, or completing activities?

(vi) What kind of help do you need to do your activities, how much help do you need, and how often do you need it?

(3) We will try to get information from sources who can tell us about the effects of your impairment(s) and how you function. We will ask for information from your medical sources who can give us medical evidence, including medical opinions, about your limitations and restrictions. We will also ask for information from your parents and teachers, and may ask for information from others who see you often and can describe your functioning at home, in childcare, at school, and in your community. We may also ask you to go to a consultative examination(s) at our expense. (See §§ 416.912-416.919a regarding medical evidence and when we will purchase a consultative examination.)

(c) The interactive and cumulative effects of an impairment or multiple impairments. When we evaluate your functioning and decide which domains may be affected by your impairment(s), we will look first at your activities and your limitations and restrictions. Any given activity may involve the integrated use of many abilities and skills; therefore, any single limitation may be the result of the interactive and cumulative effects of one or more impairments. And any given impairment may have effects in more than one domain; therefore, we will evaluate the limitations from your impairment(s) in any affected domain(s).

(d) How we will decide that your impairment(s) functionally equals the listings. We will decide that your impairment(s) functionally equals the listings if it is of listing-level severity. Your impairment(s) is of listing-level severity if you have “marked” limitations in two of the domains in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, or an “extreme” limitation in one domain. We will not compare your functioning to the requirements of any specific listing. We explain what the terms “marked” and “extreme” mean in paragraph (e) of this section. We explain how we use the domains in paragraph (f) of this section, and describe each domain in paragraphs (g)-(l). You must also meet the duration requirement. (See § 416.909.)

(e) How we define “marked” and “extreme” limitations -

(1) General.

(i) When we decide whether you have a “marked” or an “extreme” limitation, we will consider your functional limitations resulting from all of your impairments, including their interactive and cumulative effects. We will consider all the relevant information in your case record that helps us determine your functioning, including your signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings, the descriptions we have about your functioning from your parents, teachers, and other people who know you, and the relevant factors explained in §§ 416.924a, 416.924b, and 416.929.

(ii) The medical evidence may include formal testing that provides information about your development or functioning in terms of percentiles, percentages of delay, or age or grade equivalents. Standard scores (e.g., percentiles) can be converted to standard deviations. When you have such scores, we will consider them together with the information we have about your functioning to determine whether you have a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in a domain.

(2) Marked limitation.

(i) We will find that you have a “marked” limitation in a domain when your impairment(s) interferes seriously with your ability to independently initiate, sustain, or complete activities. Your day-to-day functioning may be seriously limited when your impairment(s) limits only one activity or when the interactive and cumulative effects of your impairment(s) limit several activities. “Marked” limitation also means a limitation that is “more than moderate” but “less than extreme.” It is the equivalent of the functioning we would expect to find on standardized testing with scores that are at least two, but less than three, standard deviations below the mean.

(ii) If you have not attained age 3, we will generally find that you have a “marked” limitation if you are functioning at a level that is more than one-half but not more than two-thirds of your chronological age when there are no standard scores from standardized tests in your case record.

(iii) If you are a child of any age (birth to the attainment of age 18), we will find that you have a “marked” limitation when you have a valid score that is two standard deviations or more below the mean, but less than three standard deviations, on a comprehensive standardized test designed to measure ability or functioning in that domain, and your day-to-day functioning in domain-related activities is consistent with that score. (See paragraph (e)(4) of this section.)

(iv) For the sixth domain of functioning, “Health and physical well-being,” we may also consider you to have a “marked” limitation if you are frequently ill because of your impairment(s) or have frequent exacerbations of your impairment(s) that result in significant, documented symptoms or signs. For purposes of this domain, “frequent means that you have episodes of illness or exacerbations that occur on an average of 3 times a year, or once every 4 months, each lasting 2 weeks or more. We may also find that you have a “marked” limitation if you have episodes that occur more often than 3 times in a year or once every 4 months but do not last for 2 weeks, or occur less often than an average of 3 times a year or once every 4 months but last longer than 2 weeks, if the overall effect (based on the length of the episode(s) or its frequency) is equivalent in severity.

(3) Extreme limitation.

(i) We will find that you have an “extreme” limitation in a domain when your impairment(s) interferes very seriously with your ability to independently initiate, sustain, or complete activities. Your day-to-day functioning may be very seriously limited when your impairment(s) limits only one activity or when the interactive and cumulative effects of your impairment(s) limit several activities. “Extreme” limitation also means a limitation that is “more than marked.” “Extreme” limitation is the rating we give to the worst limitations. However, “extreme limitation” does not necessarily mean a total lack or loss of ability to function. It is the equivalent of the functioning we would expect to find on standardized testing with scores that are at least three standard deviations below the mean.

(ii) If you have not attained age 3, we will generally find that you have an “extreme” limitation if you are functioning at a level that is one-half of your chronological age or less when there are no standard scores from standardized tests in your case record.

(iii) If you are a child of any age (birth to the attainment of age 18), we will find that you have an “extreme” limitation when you have a valid score that is three standard deviations or more below the mean on a comprehensive standardized test designed to measure ability or functioning in that domain, and your day-to-day functioning in domain-related activities is consistent with that score. (See paragraph (e)(4) of this section.)

(iv) For the sixth domain of functioning, “Health and physical well-being,” we may also consider you to have an “extreme” limitation if you are frequently ill because of your impairment(s) or have frequent exacerbations of your impairment(s) that result in significant, documented symptoms or signs substantially in excess of the requirements for showing a “marked” limitation in paragraph (e)(2)(iv) of this section. However, if you have episodes of illness or exacerbations of your impairment(s) that we would rate as “extreme” under this definition, your impairment(s) should meet or medically equal the requirements of a listing in most cases. See §§ 416.925 and 416.926.

(4) How we will consider your test scores.

(i) As indicated in § 416.924a(a)(1)(ii), we will not rely on any test score alone. No single piece of information taken in isolation can establish whether you have a “marked” or an “extreme” limitation in a domain.

(ii) We will consider your test scores together with the other information we have about your functioning, including reports of classroom performance and the observations of school personnel and others.

(A) We may find that you have a “marked” or “extreme” limitation when you have a test score that is slightly higher than the level provided in paragraph (e)(2) or (e)(3) of this section, if other information in your case record shows that your functioning in day-to-day activities is seriously or very seriously limited because of your impairment(s). For example, you may have IQ scores above the level in paragraph (e)(2), but other evidence shows that your impairment(s) causes you to function in school, home, and the community far below your expected level of functioning based on this score.

(B) On the other hand, we may find that you do not have a “marked” or “extreme” limitation, even if your test scores are at the level provided in paragraph (e)(2) or (e)(3) of this section, if other information in your case record shows that your functioning in day-to-day activities is not seriously or very seriously limited by your impairment(s). For example, you may have a valid IQ score below the level in paragraph (e)(2), but other evidence shows that you have learned to drive a car, shop independently, and read books near your expected grade level.

(iii) If there is a material inconsistency between your test scores and other information in your case record, we will try to resolve it. The interpretation of the test is primarily the responsibility of the psychologist or other professional who administered the test. But it is also our responsibility to ensure that the evidence in your case is complete and consistent or that any material inconsistencies have been resolved. Therefore, we will use the following guidelines when we resolve concerns about your test scores:

(A) We may be able to resolve the inconsistency with the information we have. We may need to obtain additional information; e.g., by recontact with your medical source(s), by purchase of a consultative examination to provide further medical information, by recontact with a medical source who provided a consultative examination, or by questioning individuals familiar with your day-to-day functioning.

(B) Generally, we will not rely on a test score as a measurement of your functioning within a domain when the information we have about your functioning is the kind of information typically used by medical professionals to determine that the test results are not the best measure of your day-to-day functioning. When we do not rely on test scores, we will explain our reasons for doing so in your case record or in our decision.

(f) How we will use the domains to help us evaluate your functioning.

(1) When we consider whether you have “marked” or “extreme” limitations in any domain, we examine all the information we have in your case record about how your functioning is limited because of your impairment(s), and we compare your functioning to the typical functioning of children your age who do not have impairments.

(2) The general descriptions of each domain in paragraphs (g)-(l) help us decide whether you have limitations in any given domain and whether these limitations are “marked” or “extreme.”

(3) The domain descriptions also include examples of some activities typical of children in each age group and some functional limitations that we may consider. These examples also help us decide whether you have limitations in a domain because of your impairment(s). The examples are not all-inclusive, and we will not require our adjudicators to develop evidence about each specific example. When you have limitations in a given activity or activities in the examples, we may or may not decide that you have a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in the domain. We will consider the activities in which you are limited because of your impairment(s) and the extent of your limitations under the rules in paragraph (e) of this section. We will also consider all of the relevant provisions of §§ 416.924a, 416.924b, and 416.929.

(g) Acquiring and using information. In this domain, we consider how well you acquire or learn information, and how well you use the information you have learned.

(1) General.

(i) Learning and thinking begin at birth. You learn as you explore the world through sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. As you play, you acquire concepts and learn that people, things, and activities have names. This lets you understand symbols, which prepares you to use language for learning. Using the concepts and symbols you have acquired through play and learning experiences, you should be able to learn to read, write, do arithmetic, and understand and use new information.

(ii) Thinking is the application or use of information you have learned. It involves being able to perceive relationships, reason, and make logical choices. People think in different ways. When you think in pictures, you may solve a problem by watching and imitating what another person does. When you think in words, you may solve a problem by using language to talk your way through it. You must also be able to use language to think about the world and to understand others and express yourself; e.g., to follow directions, ask for information, or explain something.

(2) Age group descriptors -

(i) Newborns and young infants (birth to attainment of age 1). At this age, you should show interest in, and explore, your environment. At first, your actions are random; for example, when you accidentally touch the mobile over your crib. Eventually, your actions should become deliberate and purposeful, as when you shake noisemaking toys like a bell or rattle. You should begin to recognize, and then anticipate, routine situations and events, as when you grin with expectation at the sight of your stroller. You should also recognize and gradually attach meaning to everyday sounds, as when you hear the telephone or your name. Eventually, you should recognize and respond to familiar words, including family names and what your favorite toys and activities are called.

(ii) Older infants and toddlers (age 1 to attainment of age 3). At this age, you are learning about the world around you. When you play, you should learn how objects go together in different ways. You should learn that by pretending, your actions can represent real things. This helps you understand that words represent things, and that words are simply symbols or names for toys, people, places, and activities. You should refer to yourself and things around you by pointing and eventually by naming. You should form concepts and solve simple problems through purposeful experimentation (e.g., taking toys apart), imitation, constructive play (e.g., building with blocks), and pretend play activities. You should begin to respond to increasingly complex instructions and questions, and to produce an increasing number of words and grammatically correct simple sentences and questions.

(iii) Preschool children (age 3 to attainment of age 6). When you are old enough to go to preschool or kindergarten, you should begin to learn and use the skills that will help you to read and write and do arithmetic when you are older. For example, listening to stories, rhyming words, and matching letters are skills needed for learning to read. Counting, sorting shapes, and building with blocks are skills needed to learn math. Painting, coloring, copying shapes, and using scissors are some of the skills needed in learning to write. Using words to ask questions, give answers, follow directions, describe things, explain what you mean, and tell stories allows you to acquire and share knowledge and experience of the world around you. All of these are called “readiness skills,” and you should have them by the time you begin first grade.

(iv) School-age children (age 6 to attainment of age 12). When you are old enough to go to elementary and middle school, you should be able to learn to read, write, and do math, and discuss history and science. You will need to use these skills in academic situations to demonstrate what you have learned; e.g., by reading about various subjects and producing oral and written projects, solving mathematical problems, taking achievement tests, doing group work, and entering into class discussions. You will also need to use these skills in daily living situations at home and in the community (e.g., reading street signs, telling time, and making change). You should be able to use increasingly complex language (vocabulary and grammar) to share information and ideas with individuals or groups, by asking questions and expressing your own ideas, and by understanding and responding to the opinions of others.

(v) Adolescents (age 12 to attainment of age 18). In middle and high school, you should continue to demonstrate what you have learned in academic assignments (e.g., composition, classroom discussion, and laboratory experiments). You should also be able to use what you have learned in daily living situations without assistance (e.g., going to the store, using the library, and using public transportation). You should be able to comprehend and express both simple and complex ideas, using increasingly complex language (vocabulary and grammar) in learning and daily living situations (e.g., to obtain and convey information and ideas). You should also learn to apply these skills in practical ways that will help you enter the workplace after you finish school (e.g., carrying out instructions, preparing a job application, or being interviewed by a potential employer).

(3) Examples of limited functioning in acquiring and using information. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You do not demonstrate understanding of words about space, size, or time; e.g., in/under, big/little, morning/night.

(ii) You cannot rhyme words or the sounds in words.

(iii) You have difficulty recalling important things you learnedin school yesterday.

(iv) You have difficulty solving mathematics questions or computing arithmetic answers.

(v) You talk only in short, simple sentences and have difficulty explaining what you mean.

(h) Attending and completing tasks. In this domain, we consider how well you are able to focus and maintain your attention, and how well you begin, carry through, and finish your activities, including the pace at which you perform activities and the ease with which you change them.

(1) General.

(i) Attention involves regulating your levels of alertness and initiating and maintaining concentration. It involves the ability to filter out distractions and to remain focused on an activity or task at a consistent level of performance. This means focusing long enough to initiate and complete an activity or task, and changing focus once it is completed. It also means that if you lose or change your focus in the middle of a task, you are able to return to the task without other people having to remind you frequently to finish it.

(ii) Adequate attention is needed to maintain physical and mental effort and concentration on an activity or task. Adequate attention permits you to think and reflect before starting or deciding to stop an activity. In other words, you are able to look ahead and predict the possible outcomes of your actions before you act. Focusing your attention allows you to attempt tasks at an appropriate pace. It also helps you determine the time needed to finish a task within an appropriate timeframe.

(2) Age group descriptors -

(i) Newborns and young infants (birth to attainment of age 1). You should begin at birth to show sensitivity to your environment by responding to various stimuli (e.g., light, touch, temperature, movement). Very soon, you should be able to fix your gaze on a human face. You should stop your activity when you hear voices or sounds around you. Next, you should begin to attend to and follow various moving objects with your gaze, including people or toys. You should be listening to your family's conversations for longer and longer periods of time. Eventually, as you are able to move around and explore your environment, you should begin to play with people and toys for longer periods of time. You will still want to change activities frequently, but your interest in continuing interaction or a game should gradually expand.

(ii) Older infants and toddlers (age 1 to attainment of age 3). At this age, you should be able to attend to things that interest you and have adequate attention to complete some tasks by yourself. As a toddler, you should demonstrate sustained attention, such as when looking at picture books, listening to stories, or building with blocks, and when helping to put on your clothes.

(iii) Preschool children (age 3 to attainment of age 6). As a preschooler, you should be able to pay attention when you are spoken to directly, sustain attention to your play and learning activities, and concentrate on activities like putting puzzles together or completing art projects. You should also be able to focus long enough to do many more things by yourself, such as getting your clothes together and dressing yourself, feeding yourself, or putting away your toys. You should usually be able to wait your turn and to change your activity when a caregiver or teacher says it is time to do something else.

(iv) School-age children (age 6 to attainment of age 12). When you are of school age, you should be able to focus your attention in a variety of situations in order to follow directions, remember and organize your school materials, and complete classroom and homework assignments. You should be able to concentrate on details and not make careless mistakes in your work (beyond what would be expected in other children your age who do not have impairments). You should be able to change your activities or routines without distracting yourself or others, and stay on task and in place when appropriate. You should be able to sustain your attention well enough to participate in group sports, read by yourself, and complete family chores. You should also be able to complete a transition task (e.g., be ready for the school bus, change clothes after gym, change classrooms) without extra reminders and accommodation.

(v) Adolescents (age 12 to attainment of age 18). In your later years of school, you should be able to pay attention to increasingly longer presentations and discussions, maintain your concentration while reading textbooks, and independently plan and complete long-range academic projects. You should also be able to organize your materials and to plan your time in order to complete school tasks and assignments. In anticipation of entering the workplace, you should be able to maintain your attention on a task for extended periods of time, and not be unduly distracted by your peers or unduly distracting to them in a school or work setting.

(3) Examples of limited functioning in attending and completing tasks. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You are easily startled, distracted, or overreactive to sounds, sights, movements, or touch.

(ii) You are slow to focus on, or fail to complete activities of interest to you, e.g., games or art projects.

(iii) You repeatedly become sidetracked from your activities or you frequently interrupt others.

(iv) You are easily frustrated and give up on tasks, including ones you are capable of completing.

(v) You require extra supervision to keep you engaged in an activity.

(i) Interacting and relating with others. In this domain, we consider how well you initiate and sustain emotional connections with others, develop and use the language of your community, cooperate with others, comply with rules, respond to criticism, and respect and take care of the possessions of others.

(1) General.

(i) Interacting means initiating and responding to exchanges with other people, for practical or social purposes. You interact with others by using facial expressions, gestures, actions, or words. You may interact with another person only once, as when asking a stranger for directions, or many times, as when describing your day at school to your parents. You may interact with people one-at-a-time, as when you are listening to another student in the hallway at school, or in groups, as when you are playing with others.

(ii) Relating to other people means forming intimate relationships with family members and with friends who are your age, and sustaining them over time. You may relate to individuals, such as your siblings, parents or best friend, or to groups, such as other children in childcare, your friends in school, teammates in sports activities, or people in your neighborhood.

(iii) Interacting and relating require you to respond appropriately to a variety of emotional and behavioral cues. You must be able to speak intelligibly and fluently so that others can understand you; participate in verbal turntaking and nonverbal exchanges; consider others' feelings and points of view; follow social rules for interaction and conversation; and respond to others appropriately and meaningfully.

(iv) Your activities at home or school or in your community may involve playing, learning, and working cooperatively with other children, one-at-a-time or in groups; joining voluntarily in activities with the other children in your school or community; and responding to persons in authority (e.g., your parent, teacher, bus driver, coach, or employer).

(2) Age group descriptors -

(i) Newborns and young infants (birth to attainment of age 1). You should begin to form intimate relationships at birth by gradually responding visually and vocally to your caregiver(s), through mutual gaze and vocal exchanges, and by physically molding your body to the caregiver's while being held. You should eventually initiate give-and-take games (such as pat-a-cake, peek-a-boo) with your caregivers, and begin to affect others through your own purposeful behavior (e.g., gestures and vocalizations). You should be able to respond to a variety of emotions (e.g., facial expressions and vocal tone changes). You should begin to develop speech by using vowel sounds and later consonants, first alone, and then in babbling.

(ii) Older infants and toddlers (age 1 to attainment of age 3). At this age, you are dependent upon your caregivers, but should begin to separate from them. You should be able to express emotions and respond to the feelings of others. You should begin initiating and maintaining interactions with adults, but also show interest in, then play alongside, and eventually interact with other children your age. You should be able to spontaneously communicate your wishes or needs, first by using gestures, and eventually by speaking words clearly enough that people who know you can understand what you say most of the time.

(iii) Preschool children (age 3 to attainment of age 6). At this age, you should be able to socialize with children as well as adults. You should begin to prefer playmates your own age and start to develop friendships with children who are your age. You should be able to use words instead of actions to express yourself, and also be better able to share, show affection, and offer to help. You should be able to relate to caregivers with increasing independence, choose your own friends, and play cooperatively with other children, one-at-a-time or in a group, without continual adult supervision. You should be able to initiate and participate in conversations, using increasingly complex vocabulary and grammar, and speaking clearly enough that both familiar and unfamiliar listeners can understand what you say most of the time.

(iv) School-age children (age 6 to attainment of age 12). When you enter school, you should be able to develop more lasting friendships with children who are your age. You should begin to understand how to work in groups to create projects and solve problems. You should have an increasing ability to understand another's point of view and to tolerate differences. You should be well able to talk to people of all ages, to share ideas, tell stories, and to speak in a manner that both familiar and unfamiliar listeners readily understand.

(v) Adolescents (age 12 to attainment of age 18). By the time you reach adolescence, you should be able to initiate and develop friendships with children who are your age and to relate appropriately to other children and adults, both individually and in groups. You should begin to be able to solve conflicts between yourself and peers or family members or adults outside your family. You should recognize that there are different social rules for you and your friends and for acquaintances or adults. You should be able to intelligibly express your feelings, ask for assistance in getting your needs met, seek information, describe events, and tell stories, in all kinds of environments (e.g., home, classroom, sports, extra-curricular activities, or part-time job), and with all types of people (e.g., parents, siblings, friends, classmates, teachers, employers, and strangers).

(3) Examples of limited functioning in interacting and relating with others. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You do not reach out to be picked up and held by your caregiver.

(ii) You have no close friends, or your friends are all older or younger than you.

(iii) You avoid or withdraw from people you know, or you are overly anxious or fearful of meeting new people or trying new experiences.

(iv) You have difficulty playing games or sports with rules.

(v) You have difficulty communicating with others; e.g., in using verbal and nonverbal skills to express yourself, carrying on a conversation, or in asking others for assistance.

(vi) You have difficulty speaking intelligibly or with adequate fluency.

(j) Moving about and manipulating objects. In this domain, we consider how you move your body from one place to another and how you move and manipulate things. These are called gross and fine motor skills.

(1) General.

(i) Moving your body involves several different kinds of actions: Rolling your body; rising or pulling yourself from a sitting to a standing position; pushing yourself up; raising your head, arms, and legs, and twisting your hands and feet; balancing your weight on your legs and feet; shifting your weight while sitting or standing; transferring yourself from one surface to another; lowering yourself to or toward the floor as when bending, kneeling, stooping, or crouching; moving yourself forward and backward in space as when crawling, walking, or running, and negotiating different terrains (e.g., curbs, steps, and hills).

(ii) Moving and manipulating things involves several different kinds of actions: Engaging your upper and lower body to push, pull, lift, or carry objects from one place to another; controlling your shoulders, arms, and hands to hold or transfer objects; coordinating your eyes and hands to manipulate small objects or parts of objects.

(iii) These actions require varying degrees of strength, coordination, dexterity, pace, and physical ability to persist at the task. They also require a sense of where your body is and how it moves in space; the integration of sensory input with motor output; and the capacity to plan, remember, and execute controlled motor movements.

(2) Age group descriptors -

(i) Newborns and infants (birth to attainment of age 1). At birth, you should begin to explore your world by moving your body and by using your limbs. You should learn to hold your head up, sit, crawl, and stand, and sometimes hold onto a stable object and stand actively for brief periods. You should begin to practice your developing eye-hand control by reaching for objects or picking up small objects and dropping them into containers.

(ii) Older infants and toddlers (age 1 to attainment of age 3). At this age, you should begin to explore actively a wide area of your physical environment, using your body with steadily increasing control and independence from others. You should begin to walk and run without assistance, and climb with increasing skill. You should frequently try to manipulate small objects and to use your hands to do or get something that you want or need. Your improved motor skills should enable you to play with small blocks, scribble with crayons, and feed yourself.

(iii) Preschool children (age 3 to attainment of age 6). As a preschooler, you should be able to walk and run with ease. Your gross motor skills should let you climb stairs and playground equipment with little supervision, and let you play more independently; e.g., you should be able to swing by yourself and may start learning to ride a tricycle. Your fine motor skills should also be developing. You should be able to complete puzzles easily, string beads, and build with an assortment of blocks. You should be showing increasing control of crayons, markers, and small pieces in board games, and should be able to cut with scissors independently and manipulate buttons and other fasteners.

(iv) School-age children (age 6 to attainment of age 12). As a school-age child, your developing gross motor skills should let you move at an efficient pace about your school, home, and neighborhood. Your increasing strength and coordination should expand your ability to enjoy a variety of physical activities, such as running and jumping, and throwing, kicking, catching and hitting balls in informal play or organized sports. Your developing fine motor skills should enable you to do things like use many kitchen and household tools independently, use scissors, and write.

(v) Adolescents (age 12 to attainment of age 18). As an adolescent, you should be able to use your motor skills freely and easily to get about your school, the neighborhood, and the community. You should be able to participate in a full range of individual and group physical fitness activities. You should show mature skills in activities requiring eye-hand coordination, and should have the fine motor skills needed to write efficiently or type on a keyboard.

(3) Examples of limited functioning in moving about and manipulating objects. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You experience muscle weakness, joint stiffness, or sensory loss (e.g., spasticity, hypotonia, neuropathy, or paresthesia) that interferes with your motor activities (e.g., you unintentionally drop things).

(ii) You have trouble climbing up and down stairs, or have jerky or disorganized locomotion or difficulty with your balance.

(iii) You have difficulty coordinating gross motor movements (e.g., bending, kneeling, crawling, running, jumping rope, or riding a bike).

(iv) You have difficulty with sequencing hand or finger movements.

(v) You have difficulty with fine motor movement (e.g., gripping or grasping objects).

(vi) You have poor eye-hand coordination when using a pencil or scissors.

(k) Caring for yourself. In this domain, we consider how well you maintain a healthy emotional and physical state, including how well you get your physical and emotional wants and needs met in appropriate ways; how you cope with stress and changes in your environment; and whether you take care of your own health, possessions, and living area.

(1) General.

(i) Caring for yourself effectively, which includes regulating yourself, depends upon your ability to respond to changes in your emotions and the daily demands of your environment to help yourself and cooperate with others in taking care of your personal needs, health and safety. It is characterized by a sense of independence and competence. The effort to become independent and competent should be observable throughout your childhood.

(ii) Caring for yourself effectively means becoming increasingly independent in making and following your own decisions. This entails relying on your own abilities and skills, and displaying consistent judgment about the consequences of caring for yourself. As you mature, using and testing your own judgment helps you develop confidence in your independence and competence. Caring for yourself includes using your independence and competence to meet your physical needs, such as feeding, dressing, toileting, and bathing, appropriately for your age.

(iii) Caring for yourself effectively requires you to have a basic understanding of your body, including its normal functioning, and of your physical and emotional needs. To meet these needs successfully, you must employ effective coping strategies, appropriate to your age, to identify and regulate your feelings, thoughts, urges, and intentions. Such strategies are based on taking responsibility for getting your needs met in an appropriate and satisfactory manner.

(iv) Caring for yourself means recognizing when you are ill, following recommended treatment, taking medication as prescribed, following safety rules, responding to your circumstances in safe and appropriate ways, making decisions that do not endanger yourself, and knowing when to ask for help from others.

(2) Age group descriptors -

(i) Newborns and infants (birth to attainment of age 1. Your sense of independence and competence begins in being able to recognize your body's signals (e.g., hunger, pain, discomfort), to alert your caregiver to your needs (e.g., by crying), and to console yourself (e.g., by sucking on your hand) until help comes. As you mature, your capacity for self-consolation should expand to include rhythmic behaviors (e.g., rocking). Your need for a sense of competence also emerges in things you try to do for yourself, perhaps before you are ready to do them, as when insisting on putting food in your mouth and refusing your caregiver's help.

(ii) Older infants and toddlers (age 1 to attainment of age 3). As you grow, you should be trying to do more things for yourself that increase your sense of independence and competence in your environment. You might console yourself by carrying a favorite blanket with you everywhere. You should be learning to cooperate with your caregivers when they take care of your physical needs, but you should also want to show what you can do; e.g., pointing to the bathroom, pulling off your coat. You should be experimenting with your independence by showing some degree of contrariness (e.g., “No! No!”) and identity (e.g., hoarding your toys).

(iii) Preschool children (age 3 to attainment of age 6). You should want to take care of many of your physical needs by yourself (e.g., putting on your shoes, getting a snack), and also want to try doing some things that you cannot do fully (e.g., tying your shoes, climbing on a chair to reach something up high, taking a bath). Early in this age range, it may be easy for you to agree to do what your caregiver asks. Later, that may be difficult for you because you want to do things your way or not at all. These changes usually mean that you are more confident about your ideas and what you are able to do. You should also begin to understand how to control behaviors that are not good for you (e.g., crossing the street without an adult).

(iv) School-age children (age 6 to attainment of age 12). You should be independent in most day-to-day activities (e.g., dressing yourself, bathing yourself), although you may still need to be reminded sometimes to do these routinely. You should begin to recognize that you are competent in doing some activities and that you have difficulty with others. You should be able to identify those circumstances when you feel good about yourself and when you feel bad. You should begin to develop understanding of what is right and wrong, and what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. You should begin to demonstrate consistent control over your behavior, and you should be able to avoid behaviors that are unsafe or otherwise not good for you. You should begin to imitate more of the behavior of adults you know.

(v) Adolescents (age 12 to attainment of age 18). You should feel more independent from others and should be increasingly independent in all of your day-to-day activities. You may sometimes experience confusion in the way you feel about yourself. You should begin to notice significant changes in your body's development, and this can result in anxiety or worrying about yourself and your body. Sometimes these worries can make you feel angry or frustrated. You should begin to discover appropriate ways to express your feelings, both good and bad (e.g., keeping a diary to sort out angry feelings or listening to music to calm yourself down). You should begin to think seriously about your future plans, and what you will do when you finish school.

(3) Examples of limited functioning in caring for yourself. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You continue to place non-nutritive or inedible objects in your mouth.

(ii) You often use self-soothing activities showing developmental regression (e.g., thumbsucking, re-chewing food), or you have restrictive or stereotyped mannerisms (e.g., body rocking, headbanging).

(iii) You do not dress or bathe yourself appropriately for your age because you have an impairment(s) that affects this domain.

(iv) You engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., suicidal thoughts or actions, self-inflicted injury, or refusal to take your medication), or you ignore safety rules.

(v) You do not spontaneously pursue enjoyable activities or interests.

(vi) You have disturbance in eating or sleeping patterns.

(l) Health and physical well-being. In this domain, we consider the cumulative physical effects of physical or mental impairments and their associated treatments or therapies on your functioning that we did not consider in paragraph (j) of this section. When your physical impairment(s), your mental impairment(s), or your combination of physical and mental impairments has physical effects that cause “extreme” limitation in your functioning, you will generally have an impairment(s) that “meets” or “medically equals” a listing.

(1) A physical or mental disorder may have physical effects that vary in kind and intensity, and may make it difficult for you to perform your activities independently or effectively. You may experience problems such as generalized weakness, dizziness, shortness of breath, reduced stamina, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, allergic reactions, recurrent infection, poor growth, bladder or bowel incontinence, or local or generalized pain.

(2) In addition, the medications you take (e.g., for asthma or depression) or the treatments you receive (e.g., chemotherapy or multiple surgeries) may have physical effects that also limit your performance of activities.

(3) Your illness may be chronic with stable symptoms, or episodic with periods of worsening and improvement. We will consider how you function during periods of worsening and how often and for how long these periods occur. You may be medically fragile and need intensive medical care to maintain your level of health and physical well-being. In any case, as a result of the illness itself, the medications or treatment you receive, or both, you may experience physical effects that interfere with your functioning in any or all of your activities.

(4) Examples of limitations in health and physical well-being. The following examples describe some limitations we may consider in this domain. Your limitations may be different from the ones listed here. Also, the examples do not necessarily describe a “marked” or “extreme” limitation. Whether an example applies in your case may depend on your age and developmental stage; e.g., an example below may describe a limitation in an older child, but not a limitation in a younger one. As in any case, your limitations must result from your medically determinable impairment(s). However, we will consider all of the relevant information in your case record when we decide whether your medically determinable impairment(s) results in a “marked” or “extreme” limitation in this domain.

(i) You have generalized symptoms, such as weakness, dizziness, agitation (e.g., excitability), lethargy (e.g., fatigue or loss of energy or stamina), or psychomotor retardation because of your impairment(s).

(ii) You have somatic complaints related to your impairments (e.g., seizure or convulsive activity, headaches, incontinence, recurrent infections, allergies, changes in weight or eating habits, stomach discomfort, nausea, headaches, or insomnia).

(iii) You have limitations in your physical functioning because of your treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, multiple surgeries, chelation, pulmonary cleansing, or nebulizer treatments).

(iv) You have exacerbations from one impairment or a combination of impairments that interfere with your physical functioning.

(v) You are medically fragile and need intensive medical care to maintain your level of health and physical well-being.

(m) Examples of impairments that functionally equal the listings. The following are some examples of impairments and limitations that functionally equal the listings. Findings of equivalence based on the disabling functional limitations of a child's impairment(s) are not limited to the examples in this paragraph, because these examples do not describe all possible effects of impairments that might be found to functionally equal the listings. As with any disabling impairment, the duration requirement must also be met (see §§ 416.909 and 416.924(a)).

(1) Any physical impairment(s) or combination of physical and mental impairments causing complete inability to function independently outside the area of one's home within age-appropriate norms.

(2) Requirement for 24-hour-a-day supervision for medical (including psychological) reasons.

(3) Major congenital organ dysfunction which could be expected to result in death within the first year of life without surgical correction, and the impairment is expected to be disabling (because of residual impairment following surgery, or the recovery time required, or both) until attainment of 1 year of age.

(n) Responsibility for determining functional equivalence. In cases where the State agency or other designee of the Commissioner makes the initial or reconsideration disability determination, a State agency medical or psychological consultant or other designee of the Commissioner (see § 416.1016 of this part) has the overall responsibility for determining functional equivalence. For cases in the disability hearing process or otherwise decided by a disability hearing officer, the responsibility for determining functional equivalence rests with either the disability hearing officer or, if the disability hearing officer's reconsideration determination is changed under § 416.1418 of this part, with the Associate Commissioner for Disability Programs or his or her delegate. For cases at the administrative law judge or Appeals Council level, the responsibility for deciding functional equivalence rests with the administrative law judge or Appeals Council.

[62 FR 6424, Feb. 11, 1997; 62 FR 13538, 13733, Mar. 21, 1997, as amended at 65 FR 54782, Sept. 11, 2000; 65 FR 80308, Dec. 21, 2000; 66 FR 58045, Nov. 19, 2001;